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Frame-by-Frame
09.25.2010
01:40 pm

Topics:
Movies

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Photography

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These film stills are taken from ffffilm a website where users can upload and share frames from their favorite films. ffffilm reaffirms the notion that we tend overlook many beautifully composed scenes when watching a film.  Looking at these images, I was reminded of a book from the 1970s, which did something similar by examining the best of Laurel and Hardy frame-by-frame, except here you have hundreds of films to look at. It also brought to mind Douglas Gordon’s 24-Hour Psycho, which presented the incredible skill, artistry and ambiguity in a slowed-down projection of Alfred Hitchcock’s classic 1960 thriller Psycho.
 
More stills from ffffilm after the jump…
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Beyond Abbey Road

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Abbey Road is pop culture’s most iconic location.  It served as the title and backdrop to The Beatles’ eleventh studio album, and is the site of the world’s best known recording studios.

Scots photographer Iain Macmillan was given ten minutes with George, Paul, Ringo and John, to capture one of the most famous and most imitated album covers ever.  Now, a live webcam, allows Beatle fans and road lovers everywhere the chance to watch that legendary zebra-crossing 24/7.
 
More on Beyond Abbey Road after the jump…
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Dangerous Minds at Fantastic Fest: remake of ‘Let The Right One In’ is astonishingly good
09.25.2010
12:42 am

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Movies

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Let Me In

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For fans of certain foreign films there are no more dreaded words than “American remake”. In recent years, Hollywood has chewed up and spat out English language versions of a half dozen or so superb European and Asian genre films, virtually destroying them in an attempt to reach into the wallets of subtitle phopic American audiences. Recent Americanized versions of A Tale Of Two Sisters, Ringu, Shutter and [REC] are, to varying degrees, vastly inferior to the originals. So, when it was announced that beloved Swedish film Let The Right One In was getting the Hollywood treatment, a collective groan emitted from the film’s legions of fans. I regard Tomas Alfredson’s dark and romantic vampire tale a modern classic. Based on a novel by John Ajvide Lindqvist, Alfredson created a movie that critics and audiences adored. The thought that anyone would attempt an American version bordered on sacrilege. Unlike many films that Hollywood recycles, Let The Right One In is not a film that succeeded because of a gimmick. It’s a film that is finely nuanced and artful - two words that are to Hollywood what garlic is to vampires. The fact that Matt Reeves, who helmed the unbearable Cloverfield, was going to direct LTROI, was not reassuring. I expected the worst. It was with a sense of dread that I entered Austin’s Paramount Theater this past weekend to see Fantastic Fest’s screening of Let Me In. Imagine how pleasantly shocked I was that Reeves remake not only honors the original but may have actually surpassed it as a work of art.

Let Me In features remarkable performances by the two young lead actors, Kodi Smit-McPhee and Chloe Moretz (looking like a very young Nastassja Kinski ). Both actors bring a tenderness and subtlety to their roles that give the movie it’s heart and soul. Director Reeves has a deliberate, patient and delicate approach to his characters that is almost non-existent in mainstream American filmmaking. In this regard he recreates with astonishing clarity the tone of the original film. Where he improves upon the original is in his handling of the gender twisting aspect of the story. He’s deepened it, infused it with a bit more eroticism and hints of romantic connections that the original film kept buried. Overall, this a more gratifying emotional experience.

There are scenes in Let Me In that did not occur in Let The Right One In and scenes that have been omitted. There’s a central character in the new film that wasn’t in the original. And there’s an action sequence unique to the new film that will be the subject of discussion in film classes for years to come. It brought to my mind a similar set piece in Alfonso Cuarón’s Children Of Men.

Let Me In
also pays homage to Hitchcock in ways that Let The Right One In did not. Echoes of Rear Window and Psycho resonate throughout the film

It’s late. I’m tired. I want to discuss the religious and socio-political aspects of the film. Why does Reeves so strongly emphasize that the film occurs in the Reagan 80’s thrusting the fact repeatedly, thru 80’s pop hits and television images of Reagan, into the foreground? Were the 80’s the culmination of the final estrangement of kids from their parents, the annihilation of the nuclear family? Why did Reeves choose to locate the story in Los Alamos, New Mexico the home of the atomic bomb? Further nuclear annihilation? Are vampires, like Elvis, everywhere because we are a society of the living dead? It’s late, I’m tired.

I’m rather certain that Let Me In is going to be a box office hit. If it is, it may encourage other American filmmakers working within the system to do what Matt Reeves has done: make a film, whatever it’s its source, that elevates the form, that doesn’t pander to the lowest common denominator, and shows a little faith in the American public’s ability to embrace well-crafted storytelling, with or without subtitles.

The following video was shot on Thursday, Sept. 23, the opening night of Fantastic Fest, before and after the screening of Let Me In. Following a short prologue, director Matt Reeves, the film’s music composer Michael Giacchino and actors Kodi Smit-McPhee and Elias Koteas discuss the film.
 

 
Official trailer for Let Me In after the jump…

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Letter from Philip K. Dick for auction
09.24.2010
07:59 pm

Topics:
Literature

Tags:
Philip K. Dick

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Tessa Dick, Philip K. Dick’s widow, is facing some financial trouble and will be auctioning off this letter from PKD, with a minimum bid of $900 at her blog.

Via The American Book of the Dead.

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
The way the got Columbian narco-terrorist Mono Jojoy is straight out of James Bond
09.24.2010
07:04 pm

Topics:
Current Events
Drugs

Tags:
Mono Jojo

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Pedro Antonio Marín, alias Manuel Marulanda o Tirofijo, right, and Jorge Enrique Briceño Suárez, alias “Mono Jojoy” in happier times.

Jorge “Mono Jojoy” Briceño, the military chief of the rebel Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) a narco-trafficking Marxist group that has been fighting the government since the 1960s, was killed yesterday during a military raid.

Colombia’s President Juan Manuel Santos told Associated press that Jojoy’s death was “the most crushing blow against the FARC in its entire history” and that for his fellow countrymen, “[...] it is as if they told New Yorkers that Osama bin Laden had fallen.”

The 57-year-old joined the FARC as an illiterate teenager and spent his entire life in the jungle. At one point his 11,000 thousand man force ruled half of Columbia, making him—by some measure—the world’s most powerful narcoterrorist..

Since his death yesterday, something interesting has come out about the way the US-backed Columbian military found the rebel leader, in El Mundo:

He suffered from diabetes which, combined with the rigors of the life in the jungle, had caused painful injuries on his feet. That was the reason why he had to order a new pair of special boots. And that was when Operation Sodoma started and his death begun.

The guerrilla command sent a message asking for these special boots, which was caught by Colombian intelligence. The Colombians were able to intercept the boots and rig one of them with GPS circuitry. When Mono got them, his fate was sealed.

The Colombians made sure that he got the boots and started to track the GPS signal. They knew exactly where he was, and that’s when they decided to launch the attack against the base.

57 aircraft, jetfighter and helicopters, attacked the complex with fifty bombs, preparing the way for the Colombian ground troops, who took over the camp with little opposition. In fact, only one of their explosives-sniffing dog died in the attack.

Soon after arriving to the camp, the Colombian commandos found Mono Jojoy’s body, along with other members of the FARC’s elite.

Via Gizmodo

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Behind the Great Wall: Life in China
09.24.2010
05:57 pm

Topics:
Current Events

Tags:
Photography
China
Life

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Incredible photos of life in China. View more here.

 
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Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Caught on tape: See the Holy Spirit in action!
09.24.2010
05:34 pm

Topics:
Belief
Kooks

Tags:
low IQ buffoonery

 
The Holy Spirit can really… fuck you up.

I love the gum-snapping blonde woman at the end. How much longer do you think their marriage is going to last with this new hobby of his?

Via Christian Nightmares

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Lady Bunny’s ‘West Virginia Gurls’
09.24.2010
05:16 pm

Topics:
Amusing

Tags:
Lady Bunny

 
Before all you “care trolls” come out in force to bitch about this, I was born and raised in West Virginny… Appalachia represent!

Via World of Wonder

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
‘Liquid Sky’: Adventures of an Orgasm-Addict
09.24.2010
04:13 pm

Topics:
Movies

Tags:
Drugs
Sex
Science Fiction

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You are an alien. You have traveled across galaxies. You arrive on earth. New York. Sometime in the futuristic 1980s - you get the picture. Your needs are simple: drugs - and plenty of them. You’re lucky, you have arrived atop the apartment of a drug-addled model, Margaret, and her coke snorting boyfriend. You’ve found drugs. You observe Margaret and her man.  Then you discover something better: sex and drugs. For when humans cum their brains produce the essence of the drug you seek. To obtain it, you have to kill them at their moment of orgasm. And guess what? Margaret can’t climax, so everyone she fucks becomes your ticket to nirvana. She thinks she’s an avenging angel, who can “kill with her cunt”; and you are an inter-planetary orgasm-addict.
 
More on ‘Liquid Sky’ and bonus clips after the jump…
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Jools in Jamaica: Lost early-‘80s BBC reggae documentary hosted by founder of Squeeze

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Fresh out of his tenure with new wave stars Squeeze, 25-year-old musician Jools Holland had launched his career as a TV presenter on the BBC channel 4 show The Tube. Assigned to cover Jamaica’s music scene circa 1984, the confident Holland strode right in to Kingston and made it happen.

Expertly directed by Geoff Wonfor, Jools’s special features footage of rising stars Mutabaruka, Dennis Brown, Black Uhuru and the Wailing Souls, along with spotlights on legendary riddim section Sly & Robbie and maniac producer Lee “Scratch” Perry (who claims he “comes from the trees”).

Not satisfied with the established stars, Wonfor and Holland prove their cred by including a gritty dancehall sequence with star microphone men Yellowman, Billy Boyo, Massive Dread and Lee van Cleef. They all do well until the on-fire Eek a Mouse suddenly hits the stage in pancho and sombrero and turns the place out.

Bookended by his intro while swimming fully dressed through a hotel pool and a beautiful finale shoot in heaviest Trenchtown for his big-band/ska tune “Black Beauty,” Jools in Jamaica is a remarkably bright document of an island in its deepest post-independence economic and political depths.
 

 
After the jump, catch the rest of the doc…
 

Posted by Ron Nachmann | Leave a comment
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