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Michael Jackson’s Neverland menagerie: What became of Bubbles and Thriller the tiger?
06.22.2010
03:17 pm

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Michael Jackson

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Ever found yourself wondering what became of all of Michael Jackson’s exotic pets? Of course you have! From the Telegraph:

Few will need reminding that Jackson’s highest-profile pet was a chimpanzee named Bubbles. After rescuing him from a research centre in the early Eighties he took him on his Bad world tour.

Bubbles wowed fans by mimicking his moonwalk on stage and the two became inseparable. At Neverland, the ape slept in a cot in the singer’s bedroom and used his lavatory.
However, after the birth of Jackson’s son Prince Michael Jnr, Bubbles – who was growing into moody adolescence – was deemed potentially dangerous and moved to a sanctuary for Hollywood animals.

For the past six years he has resided in Florida at the Center For Great Apes. Half of the money needed for his care – which costs £12,000 per year – is still provided by Jackson’s estate.

‘Michael owned Bubbles all these years,’ says Patti Ragan, who runs the centre. ‘He would visit him, but he couldn’t handle him any more.‘Chimps that appear on television are almost always very young. When they grow up they get very big and have huge canine teeth. They become very dangerous so can’t work around actors and entertainers.’

The reporter, Ewan Flectcher, apparently couldn’t resist adding:

The chimp, like his owner, is also very fond of children.

‘There are some youngsters in his group, little kids, and he loves to play games with them,’ she says. ‘He likes to be groomed by the others in his group and sometimes he’ll groom them.’

For more about Jackson’s other pets, including Thriller the tiger, read: Michael Jackson’s menagerie (Telegraph)

Plus video: THE REUNION OF THE CENTURY: La Toya & Bubbles! (dlisted)

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Fantastic Textural Percussionist Tatsuya Nakatani
06.22.2010
01:27 pm

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Music

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Tatsuya Nakatani

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Since I’m on the subject of bowed gongs and such, Here are a couple of stellar performance clips of Kobe,Japan born now Pennsylvania based percussionist Tatsuya Nakatani. Contrast his furious free-jazz stylings in the duet with flautist Kaoru Watanabe with the gorgeous drone workout in the solo clip. It’s very enjoyable to see the vocabulary of percussion expanded and stretched into ever lengthening washes of rich sound. Dude’s a complete bad-ass.

 

 
Thanks Dave Madden !

 

Posted by Brad Laner | Leave a comment
Man in ass-cot slams homosexuality
06.22.2010
09:00 am

Topics:
Belief
Current Events

Tags:
Homosexuality

 
Coming from this dude? Really???
 
(via The Daily What)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Total War: The Impact of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

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Mike Nichols’s film adaptation of Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? opened 44 years ago today during a summer of tumult. Not only were massive protests against the Vietnam War hitting Washington DC, but the last trouble-free marriage sitcom, The Dick van Dyke Show, had just aired its last episode. It was on.

Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor took on the roles of inadequate associate history prof George and his drunk university-president’s-daughter wife Martha two years into their actual marriage, which itself was one of the most scrutinized in pop culture history. The then-thrice-divorced Taylor won the Best Actress Oscar, and Haskell Wexler’s stark cinematography scored him a statuette as well. Controversy over how much of the play’s profanity to include in the film would compel the MPAA’s Jack Valenti to convert the industry’s old Production Code into the rating system we know today.

Screenwriter Ernest Lehman ingeniously situates George and Martha’s relentless turning-point fight in a well-lit parking lot, giving Taylor the pacing space to sprawl out the argument across the psyche of tortured married couples across America. The pair’s agreement on “total war” seems almost chilling in its self-indulgence in the context of President Johnson’s escalating the horrific bombing of North Vietnam at the time.
 

 

Posted by Ron Nachmann | Leave a comment
La Cage a Freddy: Homo Nightmare on Elm Street 2
06.21.2010
09:15 pm

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Amusing
Movies

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Nightmare on Elm Street
Freddy Krueger

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Examining the (apparently?) inadvertent lavender subtext of Nightmare on Elm Street 2. From the documentary Never Sleep Again: The Elm Street Legacy.

Who knew?
 
Via Popnography. Thank you Rupert Russell!
 

 

 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Whatever happened to Seals & Crofts?
06.21.2010
04:06 pm

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Music

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Seals & Crofts

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It must suck to have your music played on “soft rock” radio stations. Well, that’s not exactly what I mean, because getting radio play would, of course, always be a good thing for musicians, so let me rephrase that: It must suck to have your music played on the same soft rock stations that also play Sting and Phil Collins all day long. At least that would bum me out.

Such is the fate of Jimmy Seals and Dash Crofts, professionally known as Seals & Crofts and one of the most successful singer-songwriter duos of the 1970s.  It seemed like they were constantly on the radio and television when I was a kid, on The Midnight Special, Johnny Cash’s show and on ABC’s In Concert series. Admittedly they weren’t my cup of tea at the time—David Bowie, Alice Cooper, The Kinks and the Sex Pistols were more my style—but I could certainly appreciate their music when I heard it, which was… frequently. If you weren’t around back then, Seals & Crofts were quite a ubiquitous presence on the mainstream American entertainment scene of the early to mind-70s. They were huge, in fact.

These guys were musician’s musicians. Although their primary instruments were guitar and mandolin, they could both play just about anything. Their harmonies were heavenly. Songs like Diamond Girl, Hummingbird, We May Never Pass This Way (Again) and Summer Breeze extolled the virtues of living simply, finding true true love and devotion to God. Despite the fact that they had faces “made for radio” and little traditional showbiz charisma to speak of, it was the musicianship and the message which set their songs apart during their era and what makes their emotionally heartfelt music still so memorable and pleasurable to listen to today. (About 6 years ago, I saw their Greatest Hits CD for $5 bucks used and bought it so I could stick Diamond Girl on a CD I was making for Tara. I confess, it’s either been in the car or in the stack next to the stereo ever since).

In 1980, they basically dropped out of music to follow the Bahá’í Faith full-time (both men have been adherents of the 19th century Persian prophet Bahaullah since 1969). During the height of their success, Seals & Crofts commitment to the faith saw them stay for hours after concerts talking with their fans about their spiritual beliefs and world religious harmony. They’ve recorded and performed very sporadically since retiring. A CD of new recordings was released in 2004 called Traces, made with their children. Crofts lives on a coffee farm in Costa Rica, while Seals lives on a ranch in central Texas.

Strangely, for such a massive -selling “classic rock” act, their albums were not available on CD, save for a greatest hits and one other record, until recently.  Even Rhino dropped the ball when it came to Seals & Crofts for many years, although as of 2007 all of their albums have been released on CD.
 

 

 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
The Lives of Lepers in ‘60s Iran: Forough Farrokhzad’s Powerful Film The House is Black

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There may be a short film that’s quite as vivid, courageous and intense as poet Forough Farrokhzad’s Khaneh Siyah Ast (The House is Black)—her 1962 portrait of a leper colony in the northwest of her native Iran—but I can’t think of it. Farrokhzad was a Tehran-born female poet born in 1935 to a career military officer and married off to the satiric writer Parviz Shapour at age 16. Farrokhzad divorced Shapour two years later and lost custody of her one-year-old child.

As much as it surfaces the sufferings of a rejected population, the 22-minute Khaneh… (excerpted below) clearly but subtly reflects Farrokhzad’s own attitude about autocratic Iranian society’s disapproval of her as a strong woman poet. The twenty-something scribe weaves her verse in voiceover throughout the footage, and her raw editing style moves agilely between long studies and quick cuts. The film would inspire the Iranian New Wave in cinema that flourished starting in the late’60s.

Farrokhzad would eventually adopt the child of two of the patients in the colony. Unfortunately, she died in a car-crash five years after the film was released, at the age of 32.
 

 
Watch: Khaneh Siyah Ast (The House is Black) by Forough Farrokhzad. 1962, 22 minutes B&W 35mm 
 
Get: Khaneh Siyah Ast (The House Is Black) [DVD]

 

Posted by Ron Nachmann | Leave a comment
Lemmy visits Glamor Shots
06.21.2010
02:27 pm

Topics:
Amusing
Fashion
Music

Tags:
Lemmy Kilmister
Hawkwind
Motorhead

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Sometimes a picture IS worth a thousand words. This is one of them.

Via the fuck yeah tanaka Tumblr blog

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Bang a gong with Stockhausen
06.21.2010
01:26 pm

Topics:
Heroes
Music

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Mikrophonie
Stockhausen

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Stockhausen’s Mikrophonie I (1964) is a beautiful meeting of five people, a large gong, a microphone (used as a friction device) and a filter. From that unlikely grouping comes a cosmos of sound, so ripe is the idea of amplfied resonant metal. Need I point out that this is a major root of the later Neubautens and Organums of the world ? The clip below is packed full of interesting info so you can read along whilst having your face melted.

Posted by Brad Laner | Leave a comment
Marianne Faithfull: Summer Nights
06.21.2010
12:31 pm

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Music

Tags:
Marianne Faithfull
Summer Nights
Summer Solstice

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Since we can’t all make it to Stonehenge, here’s Dangerous Minds muse, Marianne Faithfull, to welcome in the longest day of the year!  Summer Nights was released two singles after As Tears Go By, and the below performance dates from Faithfull’s September, ‘65 appearance on Shindig.  Ahh, such a sweet voice back then coming from the great great niece of Venus In Furs scribe, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch!

Posted by Bradley Novicoff | Leave a comment
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