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Plexus: The late-60s French psychedelic Playboy
04.28.2011
01:14 pm

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Art
Literature
Sex

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Will Schofield over at 50 Watts currently has an awesome collection of scanned images from the late-60s French magazine Plexus. These are bloody brilliant! From 50 Watts:

John Coulthart at feuilleton turned me on to the late 60s–early 70s French magazine Plexus, a sexy offshoot of Planète. (John found it through DRTENGE.) It’s an intriguing mix of surreal-fantastic-psychedelic art, interviews with writers (Jacques Sternberg was the literary editor), Playboy-style comics and the occasional Popeye comic, science fiction stories, Gilles de Rais profiles, philosophy, and—though there are few traditional photo spreads—lots and lots of boobs. Each early issue features a full-color “pin up”: an erotic work by an artist like Leonor Fini.

I strongly encourage you to visit 50 Watts. Wow!

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More after the jump…

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Trump Unable To Produce Certificate Proving He’s Not A Festering Pile Of Shit

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Via The Onion

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Richard Devine’s eerie recording of tornado sirens tonight in Atlanta
04.28.2011
01:27 am

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Fresh from the Particularly Dangerous Situation in Atlanta comes this beautiful and haunting field recording made by mad genius composer/sound designer Richard Devine.  I only wish this went on for at least a half hour more !

Recording of Tornado Sirens in the distance tonight in Atlanta GA. The sounds of the strong winds and rain can be heard moving through the trees creating for a eerie atmosphere. Short recording made with the Neumann RSM-191 A/S and Sound Devices 702 Digital Recorder at 24-bit 96khz. Recorded at Midnight April 27th 2011.

 

  
 
Big thanks to Alessandro Cortini !

Posted by Brad Laner | Leave a comment
Music to zone out to: 25 Boards of Canada tracks in 33 minutes
04.27.2011
07:12 pm

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This seems like a nice way to end a Wednesday. Enjoy.

From DJ Oscar: “Here are 25 tracks in little over 30 minutes, celebrating those wonderful small pieces of sound and music that piece together the much loved Boards of Canada albums and early tapes.”
 

Bits And Bocs by Sofamixes on Mixcloud

 
(via KFMW)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
The Magic Christian: May 1 is Terry Southern Day in Dallas
04.27.2011
06:45 pm

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Books
Heroes
History
Literature
Movies

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I’ve been a huge Terry Southern fan for as far back as I can remember—I’d even go so far as to say that I’m a Terry Southern nut. Posting some of his unpublished work here on Dangerous Minds has been a thrill for me. In my day, I have gone about collecting a fair amount of first editions, magazines, memorabilia and just stuff that relates to Southern’s career. In fact, as I sit here typing this, there is a framed poster of The Magic Christian hanging on the wall in my office (it’s the exact one you see above). Terry Southern is a charter member of my personal pantheon of 20th century heroes.

In case you don’t know who the grand and groovy Terry Southern was, here’s a brief bio, taken from the Open Road Media website, where his books are being made available as e-books beginning May 3rd:

Terry Southern (1924–1995) was an American satirist, author, journalist, screenwriter, and educator and is considered one of the great literary minds of the second half of the twentieth century. His bestselling novels—Candy (1958), a spoof on pornography based on Voltaire’s Candide, and The Magic Christian (1959), a satire of the grossly rich also made into a movie starring Peter Sellers and Ringo Starr—established Southern as a literary and pop culture icon. Literary achievement evolved into a successful film career, with the Academy Award–nominated screenplays for Dr. Strangelove, Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964), which he wrote with Stanley Kubrick and Peter George, and Easy Rider  (1969), which he wrote with Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper.

Truly a “writer’s writer,” Southern was lauded by the likes of William Burroughs, Norman Mailer, Stanley Kubrick, Hunter S. Thompson, Tom Wolfe. Joseph Heller and Kurt Vonnegut. He also wrote or co-wrote the screenplays for Barbarella, The Loved One and The Cincinnati Kid and for a while, worked for Saturday Night Live in the 1980s. He was declared “the most profoundly witty writer of our generation,” by novelist Gore Vidal, no slouch in the wit department himself and is one of the “people we like” chosen by the Beatles for the Sgt. Pepper’s collage. Now the city of Dallas, TX has proclaimed May 1st, 2011, “Terry Southern Day” in recognition of one of the Lone Star State’s few genuine literary legends.

On that day Dr. Strangelove will screen at the historic Texas Theatre (where Lee Harvey Oswald was apprehended, btw) and Dallas City Councilwoman Delia Jasso will present Southern’s son, Nile Southern, with the official proclamation for “Terry Southern Day.”  Nile Southern will also be showing a portion of his upcoming documentary Dad Strangelove, about his famous father. A Q&A session will afterwards will be moderated by The Dallas Observer’s Robert Wilonsky, who recently wrote a fascinating article about Nile and the important job he performs of archiving his father’s legacy for cinema historians and literary scholars of the future.
 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Sartre Wars: The Existential Menace
04.27.2011
06:39 pm

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“Hell is Jar Jar Binks!”

 

 
Thank you Matt Cornell!

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
‘Somewhere to Disappear’: Documentary about people who have withdrawn from society
04.27.2011
05:27 pm

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Well this certainly looks like a fascinating documentary. I’m intrigued. Unfortunately there’s no information on the release date. From the film’s website:

Somewhere To Disappear is a film about the desire to run away. For his project, “Broken Manual”, the photographer Alec Soth traveled across America looking for people who’ve retreated from society. Some live in mountain cabins, some in caves, others in the desert. Who are these modern hermits? Why do they want to escape? And what is Alec Soth really looking for?

Alec Soth is a world renowned photographer best known for his portraits using a large format camera. He is represented by Gagosian Gallery, Westein Gallery, and Magnum Photos. Laure Flamarion and Arnaud Uyttenhove are young European filmmakers who followed Soth over the course of two years.

This film is about men, America, Alec Soth and the dream to disappear.

UPDATE: I contacted the film’s website and here’s what they said: “The movie will be screened at Minneapolis International Film Festival on the 2nd of May and at the Hot Docs festival in Toronto on the 5th and 7th of May.

There is no theater release yet but we are working on it and we’ll make sure to let you know as soon as a date is set.”
 

 
(via Booooooom!)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
What if Batman was a figment of Bruce Wayne’s imagination?
04.27.2011
05:25 pm

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The second trailer to The Batman Complex, an imaginary film made from assorted movies is now up on YouTube. Like the first, it plays with the Batman myth of what if Batman was merely a figment of Bruce Wayne’s imagination. The trailer’s creator explains:

Here we have a full length (well, a bit longer than the norm, but hey, what can you do…hahaha) theatrical trailer that delves a little deeper into the story behind The Batman Complex. As explained in the teaser, the gist of the idea revolves around a few fun topics, mainly the whole “what is real?” train of thought, and also every fans desire, deep down or upfront, to be Batman at least once in their lives. LOL. And so, I tried to craft a story where we see what happens when someone takes their dream of being Batman a little bit too far. An idea, after all, is a truly resilient parasite.

While some of it is still left a bit ambiguous (both unintentionally and intentionally - while there’s only so much that can be strung together, I often like to leave a little bit open so as to see what fellow fans are able to imagine/create), I believe it offers a bit more than the teaser. As you might be able to tell, the theatrical trailer takes on less of a “horror” vibe than the teaser. For this extended look, I wanted to focus more on the character aspects (and a bit of the tragedy as well), and attempt to move past the initial shock of the psychological twist. One aspect I tried to hint at was the paralleling descent of both Bruce and Cobb. As Cobb and the team go deeper into Bruce’s mind, they start to encounter the truly dark issues that his subconscious houses. As a result, Cobb himself gets caught up in the obsession of all that lingers in the mind of a Batman. There are a couple fun things in there that are best left to surprise, but all in all, I’m relatively happy with how it turned out. It’s fairly fast paced and doesn’t leave much room to breath, which helps amplify the tension I think.

It’s a well constructed trailer and a more than interesting take. Check here for the first trailer.
 

 
Previously on DM

Robin the Boy Wonder as Holden Caulfield in ‘The Catcher in the Rye’


 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Wannabe Rapper Passes Out After One Toke
04.27.2011
04:16 pm

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Amusing
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I’ll have what he’s having, please. BTW, the gentleman regains consciousness at the 1:54 mark.

 
(via Unique Daily)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Man on the Moon: Exclusive footage of John Phillips musical produced by Andy Warhol (1975)
04.27.2011
03:38 pm

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Music

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The following was written by Chris Campion and is taken from the liner notes of the CD release of Andy Warhol Presents Man on the Moon: The John Phillips Space Musical on Varese Sarabande Records.

The off-Broadway musical Man on the Moon was conceived by John Phillips and his third wife, the South African actress, Genevieve Waite, as a potential film or stage production originally entitled Space. John would spend more time trying to realize this project than anything else he worked on in his career; nearly five years all told, beginning in 1969 during the period he was recording his first solo album, John the Wolfking of L.A.

Space was born the day Neil Armstrong first set foot on the moon. Like millions of other people, John watched the 1969 moon landing on TV. He was living, at the time, on the Malibu property rented by British film director Michael Sarne, who was under contract at Fox to direct the adaptation of Gore Vidal’s novel, Myra Breckenridge, with Rex Harrison, Raquel Welch and Mae West. Sarne had commissioned John to write songs for the film.

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The Apollo 11 moon landing became an obsession. John would watch a recording of the TV transmission made on an early video tape machine over and over. The idea of exploring this new frontier - and particularly Neil Armstrong’s scripted aside as he stepped onto the lunar surface that it was, “One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind” - fired John’s imagination, and he began to piece together ideas for a mythical space opera set to music. “He loved myths,” says Genevieve, who was first introduced to John by Sarne that summer. “He liked Homer - The Iliad and The Odyssey.”

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John first began performing a small song cycle he had written about “space exploration” as early as the fall of 1970, as part of the short tour he undertook to promote Wolf King. Over the next two years, he and Genevieve formulated ideas for the story, and created a theatrical treatment (later adapted as a screenplay). Seeking a backer, they pitched it to Michael Butler, producer of the stage musical Hair. He provided seed money to realize a book and a score for Space, and brought a young director called Michael Bennett on board.

For several months, the Italianate mansion at 414 St. Pierre road in Bel Air that John and Genevieve were renting became a hive of Space-related activity. Among their collaborators was British costumier Marsia Trinder, who had designed clothes for Elvis Presley and Raquel Welch. “It was a very creative period for about two or three months,” says Trinder, who moved into another wing of the mansion with her then boyfriend to work on costumes for the production. “John was the key person organizing it all and coming up with ideas. But everybody was feeding into it. John felt that with all the secrets in the world, there wouldn’t be wars if people didn’t have secrets. And then they kind of figured out the plot.”

The initial story for Space gradually took shape: When a humanoid bomb left on the moon by the Apollo space mission threatens to blow itself up and destroy the universe, an astronaut on Earth is tasked with leading a delegation of interplanetary dignitaries to travel there and defuse it. Humanity is forced to curb its destructive impulses for the universal good.

 

The role of the astronaut was originally written for Elvis, whom John and Genevieve had befriended in 1971, while living in Palm Springs shortly after the birth of their son Tamerlane. “John was trying to sell him songs,” says Waite. “They would sit around and John would sing him different songs.”  At one point, Ricky Nelson was also approached for the part.

Read more about the ill-fated musical (with a second exclusive video clip) after the jump…

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
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