follow us in feedly
Cherry Vanilla: Bad Girl

image
 
Bold and brassy, cult figure Cherry Vanilla first came to the public’s attention playing a necrophilliac nurse in Andy Warhol’s freaky London stage play, Pork. Back in her hometown of New York City, she became David Bowie’s publicist during his Ziggy Stardust-era, working beside fellow Pork cast-member Leee Black Childers (who was the VP of Mainman, as Bowie’s then management company was called).

Later she moved to London, where RCA Records marketed her as “The First Lady of Punk.” Sting and Miles Copeland played in her backing band. Later, she went to work for composer Vangelis, running his US office, which she still does to this day. Cherry Vanilla’s memoir, Lick Me: How I Became Cherry Vanilla will be published in November by the Chicago Review Press. Lindsay Lohan would be a good choice to play Cherry in the film version!
 
Below Cherry Vanilla performs “The Punk” on Germany’s Music Laden television program in 1977:
 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Crazy video of man’s leg nearly eaten by anaconda
09.15.2010
11:03 am

Topics:
Environment

Tags:
Oh noes
anaconda

 
How in the hell does something this happen?! By the way, the anaconda loses and the man survives with all his limbs still intact.

Update: A Facebook pal points out, “Not to be technical, but this is not an anaconda… video seems to be in Africa and that would appear to be most likely an African rock python (Python sebae)”

(via Unique Daily)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
One-third of America’s video rental stores have a really bizarre survival strategy
09.15.2010
10:21 am

Topics:
Economy
Unorthodox

Tags:
video rental business

image
 
Dangerous Minds pal Steven Daly sent this Hollywood Reporter article my way this morning about a novel new way the beleaguered video rental store industry is fighting the severe downtown in their fortunes. With Hollywood Video and Blockbuster getting crowed out of the marketplace by bit torrent, VOD, Netflix and Red Box, how will the “mom-n-pop” indies survive? Well, that’s an interesting question and no, it’s not April Fools Day, either:

“Please enjoy the movie. Would you like a tan with that?”

At the rate big video-rental chains are closing up their shops, the 10,000 or so independently owned stores are getting creative to ensure they don’t suffer a similar fate. Combining movie rentals with tanning beds is one popular move.

More than 3,500 independently owned video-rental stores have added a tanning salon to their stores, estimated Ted Engen, president of the Video Buyers Group, an industry trade association.

A good tanning bed—one that consumers won’t mind paying about 50 cents a minute to use—can cost up to $15,000. Despite the hefty upfront cost and fattened energy bills, rental time combined with ancillary product sales like suntan lotion translate into a profitable business.

Engen said peak hours, days and seasons for tanning coincide nicely with the slow times in the movie-rental business, so traffic is drawn to the combo stores fairly consistently. A store with a half-dozen beds typically will garner 40% of its revenue from tanning and 60% from DVDs.

Video Rental Stores’ Bizarre Survival Strategy (THR)

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Holy moly! If you’re afraid of heights, do not watch this!
09.15.2010
09:32 am

Topics:
Current Events

Tags:

 
Warning: You may actually crap yourself while watching this video.

As a YouTube commenter so eloquently puts it, “Dear mother of god! Watching that made me shit myself.. Balls - they have huge ones!”

(via langweiledich.net)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Andy Warhol shills for VIdal Sassoon
09.15.2010
08:35 am

Topics:
Heroes
Pop Culture

Tags:
Andy Warhol

image
 
During the 1980s, Andy Warhol occasionally walked the fashion runways and did product endorsements, represented by the Ford Modeling Agency. This print ad for his friend Vidal Sassoon hair products was a frequent sight in trendy magazines circa 1985.

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
‘Dark Side Of The Lens’: the mystical art of surfing
09.15.2010
01:00 am

Topics:
Art
Sports

Tags:
Mickey Smith
Dark Side Of The Lens

image
 
Surfer and filmmaker Mickey Smith made this breathtaking video that summons up the most sublime sense of being alive and in touch with the world we inhabit.

Smith worked with Allan Wilson from the Astray Collective, who acted as Director of Photography on the project. Together they logged hours of footage across the Atlantic coastline, traveling around Ireland, Cornwall and Manchester. Shot in Super 16mm film, as well as groundbreaking work with Canon 5D mk11 Digital SLR, Smith also projected images of the huge walls of water within which he works, on to monster urban landscapes such as sky rises and castles in Manchester, as well as the cliff lines at his home of Ireland.

Dark Side Of The Lens
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Non-Stop Dancing: deeply off-kilter Chinese 70’s psych jams
09.14.2010
09:37 pm

Topics:
Music

Tags:
Chinese psych

image
 
There’s more right about this record than I could ever elucidate in a couple of pithy sentences. Best to simply bathe in its glory. You’ll be non-stop dancing in no time.

 

Posted by Brad Laner | Leave a comment
Jack White re-invents the vinyl record and it’s pretty damn cool
09.14.2010
08:29 pm

Topics:
Amusing
Music
Pop Culture

Tags:
Jack White
Vinyl record

 

The Dead Weather’s latest single, “Blue Blood Blues”, will have a limited edition component in the form of an all new Triple Decker Record. Designed by Jack White and assembled by United Record Pressing, the Triple Decker contains a 7” record embedded inside a 12” record. The Triple Decker is limited to 300 copies and are available at Third Man Records in Nashville on Friday Sept. 17, and at finer brick and mortar independent record stores worldwide. 50 copies will also be inserted in random mail order for Blue Blood Blues.

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Price of Weed.com: What is Marijuana really worth?
09.14.2010
07:24 pm

Topics:

Tags:

image
 
A new website called Price of Weed.com asks the question: What is Marijuana really worth?

From their mission statement:

We want to crowdsource the street value of marijuana from the most accurate source possible: you, the consumer. Help by annonymously submitting data on the latest transaction you’ve made.

It’s simple: you, the public, go on the site, select the area you live in and report the amount you paid for your herb and rate its quality.

The site says that it costs roughly $420 an ounce for top shelf herb in Los Angeles. I think that seems about right, although it reports the same for New York City where truly high quality cannabis—the kind more common than not on the west coast I might add—costs closer to $600 an ounce. Our friends in the Pacific Northwest get the best deals. In Portland and Seattle, high quality pot sells for just $250 an ounce.

It may be rainy up there, but at least you can be unemployed and still afford good weed. That’s important these days.
 
image

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Allen Ginsberg: Howl’s Echo

image
 
Noted scholar of Beat Generation authors, Professor John Tytell writes at the Chronicle of Higher Eduction on the flurry of activity revolving around the Beats and Allen Ginsberg this season, including the James Franco-starring Ginsburg biopic Howl (released September 23), the publication of several new books on the Beats and the photography show at the National Gallery of Art, “Beat Memories: The Photographs of Allen Ginsberg.”

From the article:

Ginsberg’s ride on that wave has perhaps ebbed and flowed since his death 13 years ago, but it is cresting once more, with the recent publication of Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg: The Letters (Viking) and The Typewriter Is Holy: The Complete, Uncensored History of the Beat Generation (Free Press), by Ginsberg’s archivist and biographer, Bill Morgan; an exhibition at the National Gallery of Art, “Beat Memories: The Photographs of Allen Ginsberg” (with an accompanying catalog, published by Prestel); and the movie Howl, starring indie heartthrob James Franco, about Ginsberg’s most famous poem and the 1957 obscenity trial challenging its publication in the United States. That trial, along with the simultaneous publication of Kerouac’s On the Road, catapulted the Beats into literary and cultural history.

The intense, candid letters that Ginsberg and Kerouac wrote to each other capture the emergence of that literary and cultural moment when America, and American literature, would change irrevocably. The letters are often elated with aspiration, extravagant—even hyperbolic—with language sometimes soaring for its own sake; at other times, they plunge into despair: “God knows what oblivion we’ll wind up in like unpopular Melvilles,” Ginsberg ponders.

The correspondence begins in 1944, when the two young men met in New York City, where Ginsberg was an undergraduate at Columbia University and Kerouac a dropout living nearby, and continues until 1963, six years before Kerouac’s death, in 1969. Although they were greeted by American media as barbarous buffoons at the cultural gates—“I go rewrite Whitman for the entire universe,” Ginsberg boasted—the letters demonstrate a committed literary perspective. Allusions to Melville, Balzac, and Dostoevsky, Pound and Eliot, Joyce and Henry Miller establish the tradition they were committed to continue.

Some of the letters describe the daring literary ambitions they had for their friends, especially Ginsberg’s for William S. Burroughs, whom he regarded as a genius. Others, written from Mexico in the early 1950s, reveal how their views were deepened by living in a country “beyond Darwin’s chain,” as Kerouac put it. Fortified with tequila and peyote, Kerouac praised pastoral Mexico, and both men saw it as a foil to an American obsession with acquisition and consumption. Occasionally the letters crawl with dense Buddhist philosophy; inevitably they race again with reports of the latest recklessness of friends like Neal Cassady and Gregory Corso. Later letters, more ominously, are full of the hysteria that overwhelmed Kerouac after the notoriety of On the Road. As he reported to Ginsberg, with some of the cascading presumption that galvanized his prose—repeating what he had announced in a television interview—“I am waiting for God to show his face.”

Read more: Howl’s Echo (Chronicle of Higher Eduction)

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Page 1383 of 1724 ‹ First  < 1381 1382 1383 1384 1385 >  Last ›