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‘Shoegazi’ tribute gives Fugazi the shoegazer treatment
06.23.2016
12:56 pm

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Music

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There’s a label based out of Sao Paolo called (with great self-awareness) The Blog That Celebrates Itself Records, which is (of course) an offshoot of The Blog That Celebrates Itself. This name of the operation derives from a sardonic comment made by Melody Maker’s Steve Sutherland in 1990 to describe the incestuous group of bands that was playing the Thames Valley around that time, including Chapterhouse, Lush, Moose, and Stereolab. The phrase “The Scene That Celebrates Itself” has since been taken to refer to the self-admiring shoegaze movement tout court

TBTCI has a knack for releasing compilations—they’ve recently released tribute comps honoring Sonic Youth, Ride, the Boo Radleys, the Pale Saints, Echo and the Bunnymen, and the Jesus and Mary Chain’s Psychocandy, among many others.

But now the label has released something truly special, a tribute album about a band that isn’t exactly in that early 1990s U.K. wheelhouse and isn’t known for tons of pedal effects on their guitar—the groundbreaking D.C. band Fugazi. Now, Fugazi’s aesthetic and that of, say, My Bloody Valentine are pretty different, but it turns out that there’s a higher quotient of swarming guitars in Fugazi than you probably remember, and that helps make the combination all the more delicious.

The obvious name for such a thing: “Shoegazi,” of course.
 

 
The compilation is called Steady Gaze of Nothing, a reference to Fugazi’s second full-length Steady Diet of Nothing. The compilation ranges widely across Fugazi’s discography with a strong emphasis on the early stuff—you’re likely to hear your favorites represented here.
 

Track listing:
Soft Wounds - Waiting Room
Evvolves - Turnover
Sunshine and the Rain - Merchandise
The One2s - Bad Mouth
Diluvia - Life and Limb
Rei Clone - Smallpox Champion
Cumin - Shut The Door
Harps - Blueprint
Siwomat - Larga División (Long Division)
Coaches - Suggestion
Blacksalt - I´m So Tired
Savage Cut - Brendan #1
Petal Head - Arpeggiator

 
You can listen to the entire compilation below, but by all means go over to the compilation page on Bandcamp and send ‘em some cash for the mp3s.
 

 
via Vanyaland; thanks to Jeff Albers!

Previously on Dangerous Minds:
Fugazi: Red Medicine for the White House, live in Washington, DC, 1991
Newly unearthed video: My Bloody Valentine destroy DC’s 9:30 Club, 1989

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Dave Grohl, Lemmy, The Dude, ‘American Psycho’ and many more garden gnomes
06.23.2016
12:38 pm

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American Psycho gnome here.

If you, like me, are tending a garden and feel it needs something extra… then why not adorn it with with one of these delightful garden gnomes by Ian the Gnome? I mean, there’s something for everyone! If you love The Big Lebowski there’s a gnome for that. If you’re a Doyle from The Misfits fanatic… there’s a gnome for that, too!

The prices for the garden gnomes can range anywhere from $40 to $85. I put a link below each gnome to direct you to its page and where to buy.

Happy gardening.


Dave Grohl gnome here.
 

A Clockwork Orange gnome here.
 

The Dude here.
 
More gnomes after the jump…

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Hikari Shimoda’s strange and beautiful paintings of children on the edge
06.23.2016
10:51 am

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Art

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where181.jpg
 
Kids are cute. Paintings of kids are cute. But Japanese artist Hikari Shimoda’s paintings of kids are cute and kinda scary.

Shimoda paints bright day-glo colored anime-inspired portraits of young children. These are no ordinary portraits. These are no ordinary children. Shimoda has said her paintings are not “human’ children—but are like avatars used to convey the artist’s “emotions and feelings to other people.”

Shimoda describes her paintings:

My motif is children whose ages are around 10 to 15 years old. Their attempt to adjust themselves to the modern environment in our time seems to be a hard battle to me. Also, they are living in an unstable time between being a child and a being an adult.

I pick up their warped attitude or feeling toward the outer world and express it through their unstable presence, I can express deep feelings I have inside, such as grief, alienation, and love.

I believe that adults who were once a child feel compassion with the children I paint.

These children are “magical.” They have no discerning age, gender or identity. They are heroic yet full of human weakness and fragility. Their vulnerability at odds with a dangerous and despairing environment—”a world of isolation and alienation.”

More of Hikari Shimoda’s work can be seen here.
 
07children_of_this_planet_11_2013.jpg
‘Children of this Planet #11’  (2013).
 
04children_of_this_planet_6_2012.jpg
‘Children of this Planet #6’ (2012).
 
More of Hikari Shimoda’s paintings plus video interview with her, after the jump…

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Mabel: 1970s Danish disco glam rockers go all hair metal & take some bad advice from David Lee Roth
06.23.2016
10:33 am

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An early promo shot of Danish band Mabel with a shirtless teenage Michael Trempenau (aka Mike Tramp of hair metal band White Lion) second from the left.
 
Hailing from a part of the world that seems to produce more blonde-haired people than anywhere else, Danish glam band Mabel got their big break sometime in the mid-70s when their vocalist Gert Von Magnus caught the eye of Tam Paton—a man who was overseeing the burgeoning career of the Bay City Rollers and got the band the opening slot for his teenybopper idols at a gig in Copenhagen.
 

Mabel, 1978.

But poor Magnus never got to taste the success Mabel would go on to have as he was quickly replaced by another Dane, fifteen-year-old Michael Trempenau who was going by the name “Mike Tramp.” And if that name has got your heavy metal bells ringing it’s for good reason as Tramp would eventually go on to front early-80s hair band White Lion. With Tramp’s addition to Mabel the band started their slow slide toward a more disco sound—a move that made the band a hugely popular attraction in Germany and Spain. In the late 70s Mabel moved their operation to Spain after gaining more notoriety when their catchy number “Boom Boom” was chosen as the official Danish selection for the Eurovision Song Contest in 1978. Things were going well for Mabel but their young vocalist wasn’t super into the band’s pop-music vibe and was instead digging heavily on bands like Van Halen and AC/DC. Tramp convinced his bandmates to switch things up by changing their name from Mabel to the more manly sounding “Studs” and trying their hand a more rock-oriented sound.
 
Keep rockin’ after the jump…

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
Kill the f*ckers: ‘White Man,’ Suicide’s BRUTAL sonic attack on white supremacy
06.23.2016
10:17 am

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Music
Punk
Race

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Alan Vega, 70s, photo by Paul Zone

I plan to stand behind my front door clutching a baseball bat for the duration of this year’s Republican National Convention, but if I were headed to one of the “First Amendment zones” in Cleveland next month, I would carry a ghetto blaster that played nothing but Suicide’s “White Man.”

Born Boruch Alan Bermowitz in 1938 and married to a Holocaust survivor during the sixties, Alan Vega knows whereof he sings on “White Man,” an obscure late-period Suicide track that deserves a wider hearing. While Vega denounces the legacy of white supremacy in the barest language there is, Martin Rev’s music—drums, a single guitar chord through a tremolo effect and a three-note bassline, punctuated by keyboard noises—corresponds to an inner state between trance and fury.

So far, “White Man” has only been officially released on the DVD One Day + Live at La Loco / Paris, a pro-shot live show from January 2005 supplemented with interviews. (A used copy from Amazon will set you back about $5.) Though Suicide has been playing the song since ‘98 (according to this fan’s timeline), they left it off their last album to date, 2002’s merciless post-9/11 nightmare American Supreme.
 

 
It just so happens there’s video of Suicide playing “White Man” in Manhattan right after the 2004 RNC. The performance falls flat, but Vega’s ad-libbed tirade is much clearer than on the Paris tape:

White man
HRRRRAARUUGHGH white man
Goin’ ‘round the world
Killin’ everybody with a different color skin
Yeah, it’s the American race
Yeah, kill the fuckers

White man
You’re a fucking diseased fucker
You’re a fucking cancer
White man
HUH!

 
More after the jump…

Posted by Oliver Hall | Leave a comment
‘I know it’s illegal, but it’s the weekend’: Man with 80 speaker sound system in his van rocks out
06.23.2016
10:15 am

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Image via NYPD 110th Precinct on Twitter
 
THIS! This is what vans are made for! Meet Nelson Hidalgo, a 47-year-old man from Queens, who was busted by the cops over the weekend for allegedly playing loud as fuck rock music through his 80 speaker sound system. This guy knows how to party. He’s my new “van man crush”!

Nelson Hidalgo, with Coors Light in hand, allegedly plastered the back of his van with about 80 different speakers ranging in size and swung the doors open, blasting music through Willets Point on Saturday night.

Hidalgo, armed with several high-output amplifiers parked at the intersection of 127th Street and 35th Avenue at about 10:45 p.m., and drew a large crowd, police said.

According to reports, police received numerous noise complaints over Hidalgos’ boss 80 speaker sound system. “I spent over $20 grand on this equipment,” Hidalgo allegedly told police, according to court records.

Hidalgo supposedly went on to say, “I know it’s illegal, but it’s the weekend.” ROCK THE FUCK ON!

Hidalgo, who has no prior arrests, was charged with second-degree criminal nuisance, general noise prohibition, disorderly conduct, and obstructing the driver’s view.

He was released without bail, and is expected to be in court on August 1.

I love this man and his van full of speakers.

via Arbroath

Previously on Dangerous Minds:
The awesome party mobile from the 1977 film ‘SuperVan’ is up for auction

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Dumbest rock auction of the century? A jar of AIR from a Stone Roses gig is fetching $97K…so far
06.23.2016
09:44 am

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Music
Stupid or Evil?

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Gen Xers—particularly those hailing from the UK, but some advanced Yanks, as well—may remember a fleetingly brief time just before the turn of the 1990s when the Stone Roses seemed to a great many otherwise sane people like the only important band whatsoever (Jane’s Addiction and Sonic Youth probably begged to differ). Even some of their Manchester contemporaries were on board with that assessment: still in my teens in 1989, I scored a face-to-face interview with Shaun Ryder of Happy Mondays, who was tripping so many balls that no matter what question I asked him, most of his answers were variations on “FOOKIN’ STONE ROSES ARE THE FOOKIN’ BEST, I FOOKIN’ LOVE THEM.” But no band—NONE—can live up to messianic expectations from an overly exuberant press and fan base, and when legal battles with the label that released their debut album left them unable to release anything, their momentum was consumed and that was that. Their years-overdue sophomore LP was generally considered a disappointment despite its wishfully grandiose title, and plus their whole “baggy” trip was kind of irrelevant by then anyway, long since eclipsed by shoegaze, grunge, and Britpop. When their reunited band was announced as the headline act for 2013’s Coachella festival, under-30s flocked to Twitter to ask um, excuse me, who?

But despite that kind of embarrassing start and the poor reception to their upbeat but insipid 2016 comeback single “All for One” (the subsequent “Beautiful Thing” is a little better), their concert dates have been greeted with enthusiasm, and really, nothing changes the fact that their self-titled LP is one of the most singularly brilliant debuts in rock history. Clearly some of their devotees remain as fanatical as the ecstasy-addled ‘80s kids that made the band short-duration gods.

Which is the only possible explanation for how a fucking jar of air from their show at Manchester’s Etihad Stadium last weekend has been bid up to £65,900.00 (almost $97K USD).
 

We’ll give the seller this: the lemon on the lid? Nice touch.
 

A helpful demonstration of the air’s capture

Which utterly boggles the mind in itself, but when considered against the fact that there are other bottles of air from the same show on eBay, one for only £0.99, it becomes damn near impossible to parse just how this could have happened. And also I’m sorry but there’s just absolutely no way a shipping cost of £12.45 (more than $18 USD) is justified for just one little bottle. The way some of these eBay sellers gouge you, I swear to God…
 

 

 

Yep, I searched eBay for “stone roses jar of air.” What’s the dumbest thing YOU ever did at work?

If you’ve got money to burn and are drool-cup stupid, bidding on the various bottles ends within a range from three to six days.

More after the jump…

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Leave a comment
Reggae Britannia: Cult classic ‘Babylon’ deals pure wickedness
06.22.2016
03:20 pm

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Movies
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Babylon is a totally engrossing 1980 British film that is set against the UK reggae and “sound system” culture of South London’s then predominantly West Indian neighborhood, Brixton.

It stars Brinsley Forde, the lead singer of Aswad as “Blue.” Martin Stellman (Quadrophenia) originally co-wrote the screenplay with director Franco Rosso as a teleplay for the BBC in 1975. The soundtrack was scored by Slits producer Dennis Bovell and featured music by Aswad (their killer “Warrior Charge” number, which figures in the plot of the film), Yabby U, I Roy, Michael Prophet and others. Babylon was shot by Oscar- winning cinematographer Chris Menges (The Mission; The Killing Fields).

From the (region free) UK DVD:

Sound system ‘toaster’ Blue and his Ital Lion crew are looking forward to a soundclash competition with rival outfit Jah Shaka. But as the event approaches, Blue’s personal life begins to unravel. Fired from his job, he begins to suspect his girlfriend is cheating on him and then one night he is brutally beaten by plainclothes policemen. Finally, when their lock-up garage is broken into and their sound system destroyed, he cannot take any more. Increasingly angered and alienated by what he perceives to be society’s rejection of his race and his culture, Blue is compelled to respond by fighting fire with fire.

Babylon is a real treat and considered a classic today. The soundclash scene with Jah Shaka near the film’s end is just a flat-out great piece of filmmaking. Babylon was difficult to see until it was released on DVD in 2008, but it’s made a strong comeback since then, with prestigious screenings and a BBC broadcast as part of the “Reggae Britannia” season.

Certainly it’s a unique film, the only one of its kind to examine the harsh life of Jamaican immigrants in London during that time. Babylon represents the first time in UK cinema where British reggae culture and Rastafarianism were explored in a non-documentary. Director Rosso was raised in south London himself and knew exactly where to find visually arresting backdrops of urban decay in Brixton and Deptford.
 

 
Keep reading after the jump…

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Underground erotica: Konstantin Somov’s secret stash of gorgeous gay art
06.22.2016
01:22 pm

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Art
Queer
Sex

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The Boxer (1933)
 
Russian painter Konstantin Somov isn’t very well known for the dreamy, homoerotic portraits you see here. He was a successful commercial artist from an artistic family, but his most acclaimed work might better be described as “retro,” or even “camp.” Somov was essentially a Rococo revivalist, forgoing the somewhat harsh realism that was popular in Russia at the time for a whimsical gouache and watercolor style that was nearly 200 years old—think big wigs and giant skirts, a lot of fussy-looking depictions of 18th century aristocracy. In some ways, his commercial work was even gayer than his gay boudoir scenes.

In Russia, Somov was an integral part of a thriving and lush arts community centered around a publication he co-founded—World of Art, which also included lavish costume and set design for the Ballets Russes. There were a lot of gay men involved in World of Art, and its predilection with fantasy and luxury were very much out of step with the 19th Century Russian Realism. After the Russian Revolution, Somov likely anticipated his work being denounced as decadent so he immigrated to the U.S. and then Paris. His commercial work is auctioned off for millions at Christie’s, but it’s his underground gay portraiture that’s got the cult following.
 

Naked Young Man (1937)
 

Portrait of A Man (1933)
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Amber Frost | Leave a comment
Holy shit, Converse is making a wearable wah-wah pedal
06.22.2016
12:03 pm

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Fashion
Music
Science/Tech

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In a huge, forehead-slappy piece of holy-shit-why-has-this-not-been-done-before news, there are now Converse Chuck Taylor sneakers with built-in wah pedals—no external hardware, just move your foot and voila, psychedelia. The concept goes back a few years, to a “Chuck Hack” event, when the design firm Critical Mass unveiled a prototype. That version was wired—you had to plug the shoe in, as the videos below will show. Since then, CuteCircuit has made a Bluetooth version.

We’re unable to find any information on when these will be made available to the public, but since half the guitarists I know wear Chucks anyway, I can’t imagine this product would fail.

After the jump, watch the Critical Mass concept video, followed by a demonstration by J Mascis…

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Leave a comment
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