follow us in feedly
Super strange sculptures only the dark and demented could love
02.02.2016
09:31 am

Topics:
Art

Tags:

Home Haunter, porcelain, fur, gold luster, china paint by Shary Boyle, 2015
“Home Haunter,” porcelain, fur, gold luster, china paint by Shary Boyle, 2015
 
That’s not to say, of course, that if you’re not as dark and demented as yours truly, that you won’t also be drawn to these gorgeous yet strange ceramic sculptures by Canadian artist, Shary Boyle. But it might help.

Boyle has worked with a number of musical artists during her career, like the equally out-there Peaches and Feist. While her CV isn’t limited to sculpture (Boyle works in nearly every medium), it is her bizarre, yet enchanting sculptures that caught my eye today. Boyle’s strange ceramics, while compelling to look at, also attempt to convey powerful messages on such topics as social equality, eroticism and the emotional turmoil that we as human beings are subjected to existing in this world together.

What I love most about Boyle’s off-kilter ceramics, in addition to their heavy ideas, is that they are at times somewhat amusing (to me anyway). Like her piece “Bless You,” which features a creepy white porcelain hand, with an drastically elongated middle finger pointed straight at the sky.

A back view of Home Haunter by Shary Boyle
“Home Haunter,” back view
 
The Dandy Widow, Shary Boyle, 2009
“The Dandy Widow,” 2009
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
Couples Fight: Synth band sets arguments to music, and it’s pretty brilliant
02.02.2016
09:30 am

Topics:
Amusing
Music

Tags:


 
Phoenix, AZ musician Travis James (a/k/a “TJ”) is the ringleader of the eclectic and snarky trio Travis James & The Acrimonious Assembly of Arsonists, but he’s attracting more musical attention lately with his ex-girlfriend, Alaynha Gabrielle (a/k/a “A”), a pianist and singer with a background in theater. Their duo, Couples Fight, transforms the most ordinary of significant-other arguments into stupidly catchy, acutely ‘80s synthpop songs. Their first digital single—“Whatever You Want,” a rehash of that one singularly annoying back-and-forth about where to go for dinner that we’ve all been in about a million times—was released just this past December, and their debut E.P. showed up on Bandcamp less than a week ago. But despite their practically neonatal status as a band, they’ve already been featured on the cover of the Phoenix New Times bands to watch in 2016 issue.
 

 

 
A & TJ have successfully turned a pretty loathsome universal experience into a really fun E.P., which we’ve embedded for streaming below. A & TJ were kind enough to give DM some of their time to jointly answer some questions:

Dangerous Minds: What sparked the idea of transcribing arguments into lyrics? Since you two are exes, it’s tempting to wonder if this wound up being a creative expression of your own actual breakup.

Couples Fight: The arguments featured on the E.P. are actually things we never really fought about, so the cliché problems other couples fight about inspired us to make songs that make fun. The title “Breaking Up” has kind of a personal element to it since we were technically together when the project started, but the details of our split would be a bit more complex to put to song, haha.

DM: You could have done any kind of music, why dancey synth-punk? What’s the actual process of making a Couples Fight song happen?

Couples Fight: Electronic music spares us the hassle of having to try to get along with actual people, cus if we had other permanent band members, we’d probably either date’m or hate’m, the former often leading to the latter. Also, not playing instruments frees us up to make a more engaging stage production with props and fun stuff to make the fun music even funner. The writing process is basically just brainstorms and back-and-forths; we mutually pitch ideas to each other both conceptually and musically.

DM: How long does this stay funny, do you think? Given that you’ve only released a handful of songs so far, there are obviously plenty of untapped topics left to lampoon. Does this project have a known shelf life, or does it go on indefinitely until you’ve had your last musical argument and you break up again?

Couples Fight: I think a good argument for the staying-power of this project’s concept is the overwhelming abundance of songs about love and relationships that have permeated popular music since forever. The history of pop and punk music alike undeniably demonstrates that there is no shortage of interest in or innovation for songs about interpersonal relationships and their complexity.

DM: What’s next? More recordings, gigs, any touring? Today Greater Phoenix, tomorrow the world?

Couples Fight: In the coming year, we want to begin working on a full-length that explores a bit more dark and less cute content and get a bit experimental in ways that don’t ruin the original approach like most idiot bands do when they say “experimental.” We’ll eventually tour, and keep going until every heart is broken!
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Leave a comment
Truly outrageous: Can ‘Jiz’ save the abortion that was the ‘Jem’ movie?
02.02.2016
08:56 am

Topics:
A girl's best friend is her guitar
Movies
Music

Tags:


 
“Why can’t we have a baby?”
“Uh, DUH, because I like abortions.”
“But can’t we let one go to full term?”
“Oh gross. Look. You know the rules. Only live things go in my pussy…”
“Yes, and only dead things come out, yes I remember.”

 
I was just having a conversation with my editor and comrade here at Dangerous Minds, Richard Metzger, and we were discussing classic overdubbed comedy videos, such as the ones we recently featured in this post about The Rusty James Show.

I was surprised to find he was unfamiliar with the Internet classic, Jiz. Later, in talking to others, I found that I actually had a great number of friends that had never been turned onto the work of Sienna D’Enema and his reworkings of the classic Jem and the Holograms cartoons. This is certainly a tragedy that must be rectified.
 

A truly, truly, truly outrageous tragedy…
 
Most of the Jiz cartoon parodies are about six years old now, but the humor is timeless if you enjoy very politically-incorrect toilet humor about drag queens who love drugs, abortions, the word “motherfucking,” gangbangs, shitty panties, and lipstick lesbians.

After the jump, some classic transgressive get-real-high-and-overdub-shit video art…

Posted by Christopher Bickel | Leave a comment
Baby onesie makes it look like your kid has a tail
02.02.2016
08:39 am

Topics:
Amusing
Fashion

Tags:


 
If you want your baby or toddler to look like they need to use a litter box, you might be interested in these cat-tail onesies with bonus buttcrack. Of course these distinctive cosplay for kiddies onesies are coming out of Japan—where else?—and can be yours for 4230 yen (or around $35).

I’m holding out for the adult version. You know it’s going to happen.


 
via Geekologie

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
‘The Tragedy of Macbeth’: When Hugh Hefner and Roman Polanski made a movie
02.01.2016
04:25 pm

Topics:
Art
Movies
Sex

Tags:

002mcbjnfnch.jpg
 
Roman Polanski’s first film after the horrific murder of his wife Sharon Tate and their friends at 10050 Cielo Drive, Benedict Canyon, Los Angeles, in 1969 was a reworking of William Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Macbeth. Polanski said the murders had traumatised him to such an extent that making movies seemed utterly pointless.

I couldn’t think of a subject that seemed worthwhile or dignified enough to spend a year or more on it, in view of what happened to me.

That may sound extremely pompous, but I couldn’t make another suspense story. And I certainly couldn’t make a comedy: I couldn’t make a casual film.

Polanski suffered a severe depression. He was deranged with grief and felt a terrible guilt for what had happened. He abandoned the film he had been working on, The Day of the Dolphin, but eventually he started to tentatively look for a subject of substance worthy of his attention. He had once had an ambition to make a film based on one of Shakespeare’s plays. Together with the writer and critic Kenneth Tynan he began adapting Macbeth for the screen.

This dark film of witchcraft and brutal, bloody murder was considered too close to the recent events in Polanski’s life for any Hollywood studio to produce. The director therefore approached a friend, Victor Lownes, who was a senior executive with Playboy. Lownes had been partying with Polanski the night of the Manson murders. He had also produced Monty Python’s first theatrical film And Now For Something Completely Different. Lownes secured $1,500,000 from Hugh Hefner to make Macbeth.

Polanski and Tynan refused to cast the expected middleaged Shakespearean actors in the lead roles opting instead for the relatively unknown Jon Finch as Macbeth and Francesca Annis as his wife, with Martin Shaw as Banquo and Terence Bayler as MacDuff. Polanski had met Finch on a plane journey and was mesmerized by the young actor’s charisma. Finch was then best known for his television work, while Annis had at one time been considered the next Elizabeth Taylor. In fact Taylor herself briefly took the actress “under her wing.” She had also modelled and was friends with a many of London’s music scene—including Jimi Hendrix.

Filming took place during some of the worst weather imaginable in Wales and the north of England. The weather along with Polanski’s perfectionism and his insistence on multiple takes caused a $600,000 overspend. On its release, the critics were overly harsh—either damning it with feint praise or like Pauline Kael, impolitely suggesting that the excessive violence in the film was Polanski’s way of exorcising his wife’s murder. The film was bleak, unrelentingly so, with an ambiguously downbeat ending. However, it was also far, far better than any critic gave it credit for, and Polanski was more in tune with a younger audience who were coming of age at the start of the 1970s against a background of Vietnam, the Troubles in Northern Ireland, and terrorism across Europe and the Middle East.
 
004mcbjnfnch.jpg
 
009mcbrmnplnsk.jpg
 
More ‘Macbeth’ after the jump…

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Butthole Surfers live in Rotterdam: ‘Those people put a lot of mayonnaise on their french fries’
02.01.2016
04:20 pm

Topics:
Drugs
Music
Punk

Tags:


 
I have said it before and I will happily say it again: There was never a band that was as extreme live as the Butthole Surfers. None came even close. Not before and certainly not since. They raised the insanity bar so high with their violent, chaotic, druggy, duel-drummer götterdämmerung that they probably merit a special category of high weirdness all to themselves. Maybe someday someone will coin a term—like surrealism—to describe their potent and singularly evil—yet juvenile, often silly—art form.

During their mid-to late-80s heyday, the Satanic mayhem of a Butthole Surfers show was probably about as far as most people would have ever wanted to go in search of entertainment. For what foul-minded, dark ritual would lie beyond them? The Butthole Surfers pulverized their audience, who were often as lysergically loaded as the demonically jerking jesters onstage. One did not simply attend a Butthole Surfers show, one chemically prepared for it like some horribly fucked-up pagan ritual. Volunteering, as it were, for a very bad acid trip.

Aside from the vicious and lacerating sonic assault of the music—which was fucking loud, I can assure you—there was also the incomparably incomprehensible nude go-go dancer, Kathleen Lynch; seizure-inducing strobe lights and 16mm projections comprised of Faces of Death-type footage, cheap Mexican horror films and 1950s era shots of people with Down’s syndrome ballroom dancing. Gibby Haynes would douse his hands (and the cymbals) with lighter fluid and then stare at the flames like a drooling idiot before putting the fire out by sticking his hand down the front of his pants.
 

 
Perhaps the most legendary of their many legendary interviews was for Forced Exposure, the greatest underground music “zine” of the 1980s. Forced Exposure, like Mondo 2000, was produced erratically, so when a new issue came out, it felt like an event. The Surfers were the cover subject of Forced Exposure, issue #11 in 1987 and much of the “mythology” of the band comes from this one source. Like their hilarious “bed in” interviews (a John and Yoko parody) on their infamous home video release, 1985’s A Blind Eye Sees All, the extra-lengthy Forced Exposure interview is a masterpiece of stoned Jabberwocky and nutty road stories:

FORCED EXPOSURE: How were the shows there?
GIBBY: They were fun. They were really fun. I couldn’t tell if they liked us. We did a good job. We had fun at the show in…
PAUL: Wales?
GIBBY: Wales, yeah.
KING: Rotterdam?
GIBBY: Yeah. What a show in Rotterdam. We used to have a cassette of the radio interview that was played over the Dutch radio station.
KING: Yeah. Gibby was put on videotape putting his dick on the record executive’s shoulder from behind. For a long time. The guy didn’t even know it was there for a long time.
GIBBY: Yeah. And Kid Congo Powers was following me around ‘cause he wanted to be my friend. Then I realized that he thought I had all the money, and he was waiting for me to pass out so he could take it all out of my pocket. I was walking around breaking bottles and trying to push people over these fifty foot things ...
PAUL: Gibby took on five Dutch security guards. That was a fun night. I ended up trying to carry all the band’s equipment back to the hotel by myself. I almost left an overcoat and something else behind because I couldn’t carry them, not knowing that all our money was in the coat. Everybody else took off.
GIBBY: I didn’t take off.
PAUL: Gibby was taking on the entire bouncer scene looking for the money that I was getting ready to leave in the bushes.
FORCED EXPOSURE: You playing Rotterdam again this time?
GIBBY: I don’t know. Those people put a lot of mayonnaise on their french fries.

Continues after the jump…

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Shane MacGowan perpetrates ‘Cannibalism at Clash gig,’ 1976
02.01.2016
02:34 pm

Topics:
Music
Punk

Tags:


 
On Saturday, October 23, 1976, the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London hosted a show by the brand-new punk sensation known as the Clash. It was an eventful evening by any reckoning.

The openers were Subway Sect and Snatch Sounds, who seem not to have made much of an impression. At that point the Clash and the Sex Pistols were in a category of two in terms of being at the absolute pinnacle of delivering pissed-off punk music and generating the electric excitement of punk (and the associated publicity too). The night before and that night too, Patti Smith was playing the Hammersmith Odeon but managed to make her way to the ICA so that she could dance onstage to “I’m So Bored with the U.S.A.” As will be easily imagined, the audience was in a rowdy mood and the alcohol was flowing freely. The show had been billed as “a night of pure energy,” and it surely lived up to that.

In the November 6, 1976, issue of the New Musical Express ran an account of the show written by Barry Miles, who preferred to go simply by “Miles” as a nom de journalisme. The cheeky, startling headline of the piece was “CANNIBALISM AT CLASH GIG,” with the subtitle “But why didn’t anybody eat MILES?” At the top and the bottom of the writeup were two pictures, taken by Red Saunders, of Shane MacGowan and a renowned punk fan named Jane Crockford, unflatteringly nicknamed “Mad Jane.” The pictures show indistinct mayhem as well as a generous portion of blood flowing from MacGowan’s right earlobe. Interestingly, both of the subjects were, or would be, in notable bands of their own; MacGowan was in the Nipple Erectors and (of course) the Pogues, while Jane was in the Bank of Dresden and the Mo-dettes.
 

 
In Bob Gruen’s must-own book The Clash he gets Mick Jones and Paul Simonon to comment on the show:
 

Mick: That was the night of Shane MacGowan’s earlobe, wasn’t it? He didn’t really have it bitten off, you know. Isn’t that the same show where Patti Smith got up on stage during our set?

Paul: That was the ICA—it was called A Night of Pure Energy. My haircut’s gone very mod; it had flopped down from all the jumping around onstage. In the beginning all that jumping about was a way of dodging gobs and missiles generally. There’s Joe with his sharks’ teeth—when I first met him they looked just like a real sharks’ teeth.


 
Gruen notes of the MacGowan incident that it gave the Clash “their first significant press coverage.” He also quotes Joe Strummer as saying, “Without Mad Jane’s teeth and Shane’s earlobe, we wouldn’t have got in the papers that week.”
 

 
In The Clash: Return of the Last Gang in Town, Marcus Gray writes about that evening:
 

When the Clash started playing, a couple in front of Miles and Red were obstructing their view of the band. Apparently intent on attacking each other while laughing like maniacs, they refused to move out of the way. So Red took pictures of them. “I had no idea how famous those photos were to become.” The NME used them to accompany Miles’s report under the headline “CANNIBALISM AT CLASH GIG”: “A young couple, somewhat out of it, had been nibbling and fondling each other amid the broken glass when she suddenly lunged forward and bit his ear lobe off [while the crowd] watched with cold, calculate hipitude.” ... the Clash gig was a wild night fuelled by speed and alcohol. The bar staff entered into the spirit of the evening to such an extent that they gave away a further £80 worth of booze ... and the twosome Miles and Red observed, Mad Jane and Shane MacGowan, were by no means content to loiter at the back of the queue.

“Me and this girl were having a bit of a laugh which involved biting each other’s arms till they were completely covered in blood and then smashing up a couple of bottles and cutting each other up a bit,” Shane informed ZigZag’s Granuaille in 1986, setting the record straight on the occasion of punk’s 10th anniversary, and, in the process, offering another insight into the mythopoetics of punk. “That, in those days, was the sort of thing that people used to do. I haven’t got a clue now why I did it or why anyone would want to do it, but that was how teenagers got their kicks in London if they were hip. Anyway, in the end she went a bit over the top and bottled me in the side of the head. Gallons of blood came out and someone took a photograph. I never got it bitten off—although we had bitten each other to bits—it was just a heavy cut.” As Shane noted, though, the anecdote was exaggerated with each telling. “It’s like the old story about the bloke who catches the fish. He says that it weighs this much and it’s that big, and within a couple of days it’s a whale.” Over the years, few have been prepared to let the fact that his earlobes are both present and correct stand in the way of a good story.

 
More after the jump…

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Cringe as Ted Cruz tries to hug his own creeped-out daughter
02.01.2016
01:13 pm

Topics:
Politics

Tags:


 
Who knows this asshole better than his own family?

We are all Ted Cruz’s daughter!
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Samurai Girl Power: Mess with these female Japanese warriors and you’ll regret it
02.01.2016
11:52 am

Topics:
History

Tags:


 
When you watch Kurosawa’s The Seven Samurai, which is set in 16th-century Japan, you are not exactly inundated with the stunning power of female warriors brandishing katanas—it’s a bit of a ソーセージ-fest, but such women did exist.

These warriors, known as onna bugeisha, find their earliest precursor in Empress Jingū, who in 200 A.D. led an invasion of Korea after her husband Emperor Chūai, the fourteenth emperor of Japan, perished in battle. Legend has it that she accomplished this feat without shedding a drop of blood. She used her position to bring about economic and social change and in the late 19th century became the first woman to be featured on a Japanese banknote.

Onna bugeisha generally eschewed the katana swords used by their male counterparts. instead opting for the naginata, a versatile polearm with a curved blade at the tip, a longer weapon that permitted the female warriors to remain effective against larger and heavier opponents. In addition, onna-bugeishas also used ranged weaponry such as bows and arrows.

Tomoe Gozen, Nakano Takeko, and Hōjō Masako are famous examples of onna bugeisha, although some of their exploits may belong more to lore than to history. Tomoe was active in the late 12th and early 13th centuries. She fought in the Battle of Awazu, in which she beheaded Honda no Moroshige of Musashi and killed Uchida Ieyoshi and for escaping capture by Hatakeyama Shigetada.

In The Tale of the Heike, it is written that
 

Tomoe was especially beautiful, with white skin, long hair, and charming features. She was also a remarkably strong archer, and as a swordswoman she was a warrior worth a thousand, ready to confront a demon or a god, mounted or on foot. She handled unbroken horses with superb skill; she rode unscathed down perilous descents.

 
Nakano Takeko lived in the 19th century. While she was leading a charge against Imperial Japanese Army troops of the Ōgaki Domain in south-central Japan, she was shot in the chest. Knowing her remaining time on earth to be short, Takeko asked her sister, Yūko, to cut her head off and have it buried rather than permit the enemy to seize it as a trophy. It was taken to Hōkai Temple and buried underneath a pine tree.
 

 

 
More impressive onna bugeisha after the jump…...

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
There’s a place in Germany where you can ride Falkor and see the props from ‘The Neverending Story’
02.01.2016
10:24 am

Topics:
Movies
Pop Culture

Tags:


 
I didn’t know the majority of The Neverending Story was shot in Germany (except for a few scenes which were shot in Vancouver, Canada and in Almerín, Spain). Apparently it was the most expensive German film ever made until then.

The reason I’m bringing up where the film was shot is because there’s a tourist attraction in Munich, Germany that has all of the props and models from The Neverending Story. It’s called Bavaria Films—similar to Universal Studios’s themeparks—where folks can ride Falkor or the snail and see all the stuff used in film. I’ve found a few photos to give you an idea of what the attraction is like. Kind of cool, right?

If you find yourself in Munich, Germany, you may want to check this out.


 

 

 
More after the jump…
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Page 5 of 1919 ‹ First  < 3 4 5 6 7 >  Last ›