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Pizza-themed ‘punk’ albums are stupid, but funny
07.18.2014
09:11 am

Topics:
Amusing
Food
Music

Tags:
Pizza


 
I kinda hate myself for blogging this, but yet, here I am… fucking blogging this! I laughed at a few these, okay?! The Richard Hell and The Voidoids album cover with the Domino’s Pizza character the Noid is sorta genius. Or maybe not. Perhaps I’m just easily amused.

So why do these exist, you ask? Riot Fest is holding an online contest where folks are asked to “pizzafy” any punk album of their choice and a winner will be chosen on July 31, 2014. The winner is picked by Internet voters. 
 

 

 

 

 
More after the jump…

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Communism in textiles: Soviet fabrics from the 20’s and 30’s
07.18.2014
08:31 am

Topics:
Art
Design
History

Tags:
Soviet Union
USSR
communism


 
If you walked by a set of curtains made from one of these fabrics, you might not pick up on a communist star or the CCCP acronym. Many of the designs below are thematic of classical Russian art; you see lush color, dense scapes and even the odd Orientalist trope (note the pattern with the camels).

Anything more than a quick glance however, might reveal romantic depictions of farmers and factory workers, often rendered in the angular, geometric lines of Soviet Constructivism. Even more explicit are the references to Soviet ambitions of modernization. We see tractors, cars, airplanes, trains and smoke stacks—all the promise of an industrialized workers state.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 
More Soviet textiles after the jump…

Posted by Amber Frost | Leave a comment
David Bowie in his tighty-whiteys, 1973
07.18.2014
07:49 am

Topics:
Amusing
Fashion
Music
Pop Culture

Tags:
David Bowie


 
Many of you have probably already seen these stills of David Bowie in his “tighty-whiteys” from a 1973 photoshoot. I think they should be resurrected from time-to-time here on Dangerous Minds. Never forget!

Admittedly, I still giggle like a young schoolgirl every damned time I see these.


 

 

 
h/t Britrockaholic

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
‘The Black Man in the Cosmos’: Sun Ra teaches at UC Berkeley, 1971
07.18.2014
06:48 am

Topics:
Music
Race
Thinkers

Tags:
Sun Ra


 
The first thing I’d do with a time machine is point it to Berkeley, California, 1971. Those are the spacetime coordinates of the Afro-American Studies course Sun Ra taught at UC Berkeley. I’ve never been able to find an image of an original syllabus, but the reading list reportedly included the King James Bible, Blavatsky, Ouspensky, Radix by Bill Looney, the Egyptian Book of the Dead, LeRoi Jones’ Black Fire, The Real History of the Rosicrucians, The Secret Doctrine of the Rosicrucians, The Rosicrucians: Their Rites and Mysteries, OAHSPE, and In the Pronaos of the Temple of Wisdom.

According to John F. Szwed’s scholarly biography Space Is The Place: The Lives And Times Of Sun Ra, when students complained that some of these books were impossible to find, their professor “merely smiled knowingly”—of course the books that disclosed the secret history of the world were hard to come by. Szwed describes the class:

“Every week during the spring quarter of 1971 he met his class, Afro-American Studies 198: ‘The Black Man in the Cosmos,’ in a large room in the music department building. Although a respectable number of students signed up, after a couple of classes it was down to a handful (‘What could you expect with a course named like that,’ Sun Ra once chortled). [...] But it was a proper course—Sun Ra had after all trained to be a teacher in college—with class handouts, assignments, and a reading list which made even the most au courant sixties professors’ courses pale.

[...] In a typical lecture, Sun Ra wrote biblical quotes on the board and then ‘permutated’ them—rewrote and transformed their letters and syntax into new equations of meaning, while members of the Arkestra passed through the room, preventing anyone from taping the class. His lecture subjects included Neoplatonic doctrines; the application of ancient history and religious texts to racial problems; pollution and war; and a radical reinterpretation of the Bible in light of Egyptology.”

Apparently, the Arkestra’s agents failed to prevent the taping of Sun Ra’s May 4 lecture, “The Power of Words,” a recording of which surfaced on the double-CD set The Creator Of The Universe. Though the recording starts and ends abruptly in mid-sentence, it’s actually of higher fidelity than much of the master’s officially sanctioned musical product (just listen to the tapping of the chalk on the board). The whole thing is worth listening to, but for me the climax comes around the 37-minute mark. “If you’re not mad at the world, you don’t have what it takes,” Sun Ra told his musicians, and towards the end of the lecture, the questions of a tardy student seem to touch a nerve. Prof. Ra’s improvised response is an impassioned summary of his militant, gnostic philosophy:

“I’m thinking about the future of black Egypt, which is outside of the realm of history. History has been very unkind to black people, so actually what I’m always talking about is the myth, and nothing that has ever been is part of what I’m talking about, because I’m saying that black folks need a myth-ocracy instead of a de-mocracy. Because they’re not gonna make it in anything else. They’re not gonna make it in history[. . .]

You see, that’s what’s wrong with y’all. Now here you walk in, the last man to get in here, and you gonna ask questions. But honesty is not what I’m talking about. You’re not in a place where truth can do you any good. So you gonna have to come to me privately, and we’ll talk about things that can help the black race. Truth has been abolished, so any truth you say is not permissible in here, because it never done anybody any good. Now, I’m dealing with things that can do you some good. If I come across the biggest lie in the universe, if it can help the black race, then I’m gonna use it. That’s fair warning to anybody, any nation on the face of the earth. I’m gonna use anything I find, and any weapon that I find.

Now I find that the truth is not permissible for me to use. Because I’m not righteous and holy; I’m evil. That’s because I’m black. And I’m not a striver to any righteousness. I never been righteous, I’m never going to be righteous. So now I’m evil. I’m the incarnation of evil. I’m black. I’m following their dictionary. Now I’m dealing with equations. I can’t go around and tell you I’m ‘right’ or ‘good’ when the dictionary is telling everybody in the world everything black is evil and wicked, so then I come and say, ‘Yes. So what? Yes, I’m wicked. Yes, I’m evil.’ I’m not gonna be converted. I’m not gonna strive to righteousness. I don’t wanna go to heaven, because good folks don’t never do nothing but be good, and they always failing, and they always getting killed, and they frustrating. So all I see on this planet is something evil like the white man being successful, and successful, and successful, and successful.

And I see evil killing black men every day, destroying him. Why should I be good? No, it’s better for me to come up to the white race and say, ‘Yes. We evil people should sit down to the table and talk together. You’re evil, I’m evil too. Now, them other folks that you’re dealing with are good black folks. I’m not good, and you’re not good. We understand one another.’”

This is before he gets to explaining that white people are evil and wicked because “they were made evil and wicked in imitation of the evil and wicked black man,” but you should really just listen to the whole thing.

Listen to, or download the entire thing at Sensitive Skin

Posted by Oliver Hall | Leave a comment
Ornately embellished wolf and goat skulls inspired by Norse myth
07.18.2014
06:11 am

Topics:
Art

Tags:
skulls
Tamara Howell
Norse myth


 
Iowa artist Tamara Howell has undertaken a series of sculptures inspired by Norse myth, and among those pieces are five jaw-droppingly lovely skulls—two wolves, three goats—beautifully embellished with, as her web site simply states, “clay and mixed media.” I’d love to know more about her process, but, perhaps with an eye towards maintaining a mystique, Howell seems to demure on those details.
 

 

 

”Sköll Devours the Sun”
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Leave a comment
‘Rave of Thrones’: Have a listen to Hodor’s Sound Cloud page
07.17.2014
11:39 am

Topics:
Music
Television

Tags:
Game of Thrones
Kristian Nairn

hodorraves.jpg
 
Game of Thrones actor Kristian Nairn has announced a Rave of Thrones tour of Australia this August and September.

Nairn, who plays the gentle giant from Winterfell, has a second career as a successful DJ back in his native Northern Ireland and has perfomed with Scissor Sisters and as far afield South Africa and Australia. Now he will returning “down under” to bring the Seven Kingdoms with his skills as a DJ.

Details here.

If you want a taste of the kind of tunes Hodor will be playing have a listen to his Sound Cloud page.
 

 

 

 
H/T Popbitch

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Have you ever wondered how many Scientologists there REALLY are?
07.17.2014
11:31 am

Topics:
Belief

Tags:
Scientology


 
The Church of Scientology has often asserted that it has approximately ten million members worldwide. Ten million, you say? TEN MILLION???

For crying out loud. Think about it: Jews worldwide number north of 13.5 million, or just about .02% of the population. No way are there nearly as many Scientologists.

How many Scientologists do you personally know? Well, I live in Los Angeles and I am not acquainted with even one single solitary Scientologist (at least not that I am aware of). If I didn’t know better, I’d say that they were about as scarce as Republicans are here!

That we are meant to believe that there are ten million adherents to the sci-fi religion founded by sci-fi writer L. Ron Hubbard is, of course, ludicrous. In 2011, former editor (and longtime Scientology foe) Tony Ortega wrote at The Village Voice:

According to the latest [ARIS or American Religious Identification Survey] survey, the total number of people who identify as Scientologists is just 25,000 in this country of more than 300 million human beings.

That’s one Scientologist for about every 12,000 Americans.

In other words, the total number of active U.S. Scientologists is about the size of your run-of-the-mill local credit union.

But there’s more. As paltry as that number is, the news is even worse for Scientology, because previous surveys by the same researchers show a steep drop in membership in recent years, reflecting anecdotal evidence that there’s been a “mass exodus” (as Reitman calls it) under the leadership of David Miscavige.

In 1990, ARIS had found about 45,000 Scientologists. In 2001, it found 55,000, and in 2008, it found 25,000.

Yikes, that is some steep seven year drop-off in Scientologists, ain’t it? As Ortega goes on to point out, there are more people who self-identify as Rastafarians than as Scientologists.

Nevertheless, revenues from the Church’s large business network—corporations, non-profits and other legal entities—are estimated at half a billion dollars annually.
 

 
Jeff Hawkins, once Scientology’s head of public relations, now an anti-Scientology blogger, activist and author, estimates that there are no more than 40,000 Scientologists worldwide, at the high end. England and Canada both have fewer than two thousand adherents to the gospel of L. Ron Hubbard. Most Scientologists live right here in Los Angeles. The Church’s celebrity elite and its real estate holdings are highly visible, the rank and file membership considerably less so.

Nevertheless, revenues from the Church’s large business network—corporations, non-profits and other legal entities—are estimated at half a billion dollars annually! Additionally, author Lawrence Wright has revealed that the Church has over $1 billion in liquid assets.

As Hubbard once said:

“To keep a person on the Scientology path, feed him a mystery sandwich.”

A $25,000 mystery sandwich, that’s doled out a bite at a time promising the mark that when the sandwich is finished they will be able to “control or operate thought, life, matter, energy, space, and time” whether or not he or she even still has a body! That’s some sandwich and yes, pretty mysterious, I reckon.

Below, four former-Scientologists who reached the upper levels of Thetandom speak out about their experiences in Scientology. How could someone believe that they were a master of “energy, space and time” wearing a Hawaiian shirt and short pants?

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
George Harrison’s 1966 selfies from India
07.17.2014
09:13 am

Topics:
Music
Pop Culture

Tags:
George Harrison
India


 
George Harrison’s 1966 trip to India was a major catalyst in the development of the Beatles’ sound, and pop music was forever changed by his sitar tutelage under Ravi Shankar. However, all the talk about the musical, spiritual and yoga training tend to obfuscate the real historic legacy of Harrison’s journey—selfies!!!  The quiet Beatle captured some really beautiful scenery (as well as his lovely face), using a fisheye lens to clever effect. Frankly, I’m a little surprised Instagram hasn’t pushed for a nostalgic fisheye comeback—who doesn’t like a little psychedelic bulge to their selfie?
 

 

 

 

 
More after the jump…

Posted by Amber Frost | Leave a comment
Joaquin Phoenix’s forehead has its own tiny, bearded actor
07.17.2014
08:18 am

Topics:
Amusing

Tags:
Joaquin Phoenix
Her


 
I was shocked and appalled when Joaquin Phoenix’s forehead was overlooked for an Oscar nomination for Her. That’s true talent when your forehead has its own little actor. It’s like an actor within an actor, or else it’s some sort of freakish, disturbing alien growth. You decide!

BTW, the longer you watch this video the funnier it gets. It’s dumb as all hell, true, but hilarious nonetheless. As others point out in the YouTube comments, they don’t think they’ll be able to watch another Joaquin Phoenix film again without staring at his forehead and bursting out in laughter.

You may want to turn down the volume slightly.

 
Previously on Dangerous Minds:
HIM? Scarlett Johansson’s voice in ‘Her’ replaced by Dr. Steve Brule’s

via reddit

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
The doodly Picasso faces of Norman Mailer
07.17.2014
08:07 am

Topics:
Art
Literature

Tags:
Norman Mailer
Pablo Picasso

Norman Mailer
 
Norman Mailer’s admiration for Pablo Picasso is well known; in 1995 he published a book, Portrait of Picasso as a Young Man: An Interpretive Biography about the modernist master.

According to Amy Weiss-Meyer at The New Republic, Mailer would frequently take his two daughters to what he called “the Church of MOMA,” where they often would find themselves admiring this or that Picasso masterpiece. He also loved to draw, and he commonly sent friends cute little doodles, many of them of the human face. According to Mailer’s daughter Danielle, drawing was a respite from writing, which was a laborious and taxing undertaking. Drawing, on the other hand, was simply fun for him, an escape into pure delight. A new online platform called POBA is hosting a good many of Mailer’s doodles, many of which are reproduced below.

This passage from J. Michael Lennon’s Norman Mailer: A Double Life mentions the doodles: “Most of his correspondents got Xerox copies of one of his drawings, doodles, and cartoons, and faces made of numbers, an idea he says he got from Picasso, who as a boy thought the number seven was an upside-down nose.”

As you can see, there’s a numerological facial portrait in the set, but Mailer opted to use a 1 for the nose, rather than a 7.
 
Norman Mailer
Parted Hair, 1985
 
Norman Mailer
Open Face, 1985
 
Norman Mailer
Ink on paper, 1974
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
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