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Mystic Sister / Magick Brothers: Gong live at Montserrat, 1973
11.19.2012
12:27 pm

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Music

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Moody, atmospheric live film of Gong onstage in a cathedral in Montserrat in 1973 with the classic line-up of Tim Blake on synth, the late, great Pierre Moerlen on drums, Mike Howlett on bass, Didier Malherbe on sax and flute, Steve Hillage on guitar, and, of course, Daevid Allen and Gilli Smyth.

Interesting to note how many older people were in attendance. What did they make of THIS?

Taken from the Gong at Montserrat 1973 DVD, which I highly recommend (cough, cough).
 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Mitt Romney voters, an *extremely* eye-opening electoral map
11.19.2012
11:45 am

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Politics

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One of the single most revealing infographics to emerge post election was this one, displaying US population density vs. Republican votes for the top of the ticket.

So, if your nearest neighbor lives about 30 miles “down the road” (not that there is anything wrong with that) you were probably more likely to vote for Mitt Romney.

City dwellers? Well… not so much.

No wonder the GOP’s get out the vote effort sucked so badly… And it’s only going to get more difficult next time!

Via the map’s maker, Tim De Chant, at his Per Square Mile blog:

There are lots of reasons why the 2012 presidential election broke the way it did, but one that’s not often reported—but particularly germane to Per Square Mile—is the divide between cities and the country. I’ve been thinking for a while now about this split as a driving force behind the polarization of U.S. politics, and I know I’m not alone.

But I was curious. Can we actually see the divide between cities and the country in the electoral map? In short, yes, but I’ll let the maps to the rest of the talking.

Click through to Tim’s website for an interactive version of this map to see how population density relates to each candidates’ electoral vote tally.

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Embroidery of Iggy Pop, Hunter S. Thompson, Freddie Mercury, and more
11.19.2012
08:45 am

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Art
Books
Music

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Domestic, no?
 
If you’re like me and want to replace your extensive poster collections with something slightly more grown-up, you may want to go with these awesome embroidery hoops of your favorite pop culture icons. They might be a bit twee, sure, but I figure this is a nice compromise between decorating like I’m still in college and actually developing mature taste in art, which frankly, sounds like a lot of work and money.

I’m common and vulgar, but I’m common and vulgar with a Bachelor’s Degree, dammit.
 
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Posted by Amber Frost | Leave a comment
James Dean: Drawings
11.17.2012
08:12 pm

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Art
Movies
Pop Culture
R.I.P.

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A selection of drawings by James Dean.

For those with an interest in the charismatic actor, there’s an exhibition called Eternal James Dean, which opens at the Indiana State Museum from November 23, 2012, until June, 3rd, 2013.

Eternally young, sexy and intense. That’s the image of James Dean. But who was James Dean the man? Born in Marion, Indiana, Dean made just three films before his death in 1955 at age 24. Eternal James Dean will take a look at his Indiana roots, his brief time as an actor in California and New York, his films and his passion for motorcycles and racing.

More information here.
 
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More drawings by James Dean, after the jump…
 
Via Retronaut.
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
‘Krautrockers in Outer Space’: A music/video mega-mix
11.17.2012
05:00 pm

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Movies
Music

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The Future Is Now!

Fairy Tales - Kin Ping Meh
Queen Of Spades - Curly Curve
A Place To Go - Embryo
China - Electric Sandwich
It All Depends - The Scorpions
Ride The Sky - Lucifer’s Friend
No Freak Out - Spermuell
Norderland - Eroc
Gammy Ray - Birth Control
Castle In The Air - Eloy
So Far - Faust
Watussi - Harmonia
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
‘Holy Motors’: The most amazing film of 2012
11.17.2012
04:21 pm

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Art
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Holy Motors opened yesterday at the Nuart in Los Angeles, as well as other cities in the US (click here). It’s a film I love and I’m on a mission to encourage Dangerous Minds’ readers to see this wonderful masterpiece. So, I’m re-posting a review I wrote a few months ago after seeing the movie at Fantastic Fest. Here goes:

Holy Motors screened several times during the fest and as a result a lot of people got to see it. A good thing for getting the word out on a film that is almost impossible to describe without waxing poetic. The most satisfying conversations I got into during FF were the ones in which people were trying to crack the Holy Motor code. While the film has an wonderful aura of mystery about it, the essence of the film is clear - it is a movie about the pleasures of seeing movies and making them. And part of the pleasure of the movies is having them fuck with your head. Holy Motors is a mindbender of a very rare sort. I include it among my favorites: Performance, El Topo and Enter The Void.


Holy Motors

Synopsis (from the press release):

From dawn to dusk, a few hours in the life of Monsieur Oscar, a shadowy character who journeys from one life to the next. He is, in turn, captain of industry, assassin, beggar, monster, family man…He seems to be playing roles, plunging headlong into each part – but where are the cameras? Monsieur Oscar is alone, accompanied only by Céline, the slender blonde woman behind the wheel of the vast engine that transports him through and around Paris. He’s like a conscientious assassin moving from hit to hit. In pursuit of the beautiful gesture, the mysterious driving force, the women and the ghosts of past lives. But where is his true home, his family, his rest?

When Holy Motors’ Mr. Oscar (the magical Denis Lavant) is asked why he does what he does, he replies that it’s for “the beauty of the act.” Director Leos Carax might reply similarly in describing why Holy Motors does what it does.

In his exhilarating new film, Carax seems to have tapped into cinema’s Akashic Record and brought it to Earth in distilled form. From the opening scene where Carax unlocks the door that opens onto the theater of his brain to the Amen choir of limousines at the end, Holy Motors is as pure as cinema gets. It is about the thing it is, not the thing it is about. It’s reference point is itself. Carax will pull any rug from under any scene to remind us that we are watching a movie and to glory in the artifice of it all. Holy Motors embraces the history of cinema like a drunken poet throwing his arms around the alphabet. The result is a mercurial mindfucker of a movie.

It’s been 13 years since Carax directed his last feature-length film, Pola X, and he’s returned to film making with the fervor of a man who has a lot to get out of his system. But like Holy Motors’  troll with the perpetual hard-on, Carax hasn’t shot his load recklessly or randomly. Carax is a Tantric Master fucking the sacred machine of his art with deep fluid strokes. He uses cinema like a particle generator creating a red hot beam of alchemical fire directed at the very center of the viewer’s pineal gland. His intent is to get you high and he does. He draws you to the screen like a moth is drawn to light. He draws you to the screen like a camera is drawn to a woman’s face, or the stars, in their sparkling suicidal glee, are drawn to blackness. He draws you to the screen with the precision of a Bunuelian razorblade tearing open the curtains of your eyes.

Carax has made a film he obviously had to make. He is getting at something deep within himself and he takes us with him - into a place where others have traveled and are traveling still: Bunuel, Cocteau, Kubrick, Muybridge, Jodorowsky, Noe, Argento, Tarantino, Beineix, Franju, Roeg, Lisberger, Melville, Bertolucci, Donen, Godard, Powell and Pressburger, Marker…He is navigating a road trip through cinema and we are riding in the catbird seat of his dream machine as delighted as children with our heads out the window and our hair wildly blowing in the wind.

One of many goose pimple-inducing moments in Holy Motors is this musical interlude, an accordion cover of R.L. Burnside’s “Let My Baby Ride.”
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Zombie Proof Glass?
11.16.2012
02:43 pm

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Advertising
Amusing

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Advert with an interesting use of Zombies.
 

 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Security cameras capture other-worldly Sandy destruction in real-time
11.16.2012
09:52 am

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Environment

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While we frequently complain about the security culture in NYC, the closed circuit television cameras often capture some astonishing footage. The video below was taken by Port Authority cameras at Hoboken and Exchange Place. Even having read about it, it’s difficult to fathom the destruction of the storm without video, and when one considers the vast underground transit systems that flooded, the recovery time of the MTA is all the more impressive.
 

Posted by Amber Frost | Leave a comment
Socialist anarchist Dorothy Day endorsed by US bishops for sainthood
11.16.2012
09:50 am

Topics:
Activism
Class War
Heroes
History
Thinkers

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Dorothy Day was not your stereotypical Catholic.

Born in 1897, her working class background engrained in her a strong sense of social justice from an early age. After receiving a scholarship to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, she dropped out after two years to become more involved in socialist organizing, as well as antiwar and suffrage activism.  She was deeply invested, partaking in hunger strikes and enduring brutal police abuse.

Day actually converted to Catholicism in her late 20s, as much a spiritual awakening as an act of solidarity with what was largely the faith of the working class people who surrounded her. Her life was peppered with love affairs, and she was upfront about her abortion. Dorothy Day was an extremely controversial figure, and most notably, the founder of The Catholic Worker, one of the major publications of the New Deal Left.

Since Day’s death in 1980, there have been vocal advocates for her canonization, but the Catholic Church isn’t known for administering sainthood upon socialist anarchist radicals who vehemently spoke for women’s rights. Recently U.S. Bishops called for her sainthood, the first statement made in favor of her canonization by ordained clergy.

Dorothy Day lead a fascinating life, and no Leftist worth their salt, secular or not denies her influence on the movement. The paradox is astounding, though; Catholicism as a cultural force, rather than the dogmatic hierarchy it often is, has a long history of Leftist activism in the U.S. Dorothy Day, the woman who said “Don’t call me a saint; I don’t want to be dismissed that easily,” would say that the Catholic Church doesn’t make saints, it can merely choose to recognize them or not.

The trailer for Dorothy Day: Don’t Call Me a Saint:
 

Posted by Amber Frost | Leave a comment
Honey Boo Boo portrait made from junk and trash
11.16.2012
09:49 am

Topics:
Amusing
Art
Television
U.S.A.!!!

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Jason Mecier‘s portrait of Honey Boo Boo made of “two cans of hair spray, three tiaras, make-up, mascara, fake eyelashes, coupons, sketti, butter, ten cheese balls, two Red Bulls, one Mountain Dew, a McDonald’s chicken nugget, a pink Snuggy box, an empty toilet paper roll, one cabbage patch doll and a jar of Pigs Feet.”

Apparently it took Mecier over 50 hours to make it.

Via Boing Boing

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
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