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Anti-Acid House propaganda from British tabloids, late 80s
04.12.2013
02:59 pm
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These anti-Acid House headlines are giving me a case of the giggles. The majority of the newspaper clippings—circa late 80s—are from British tabloids The Sun and Daily Express. I don’t think they were very effective. 

All clippings were collected by Flickr user KRS-Dan.
 
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More after the jump…
 

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Posted by Tara McGinley
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04.12.2013
02:59 pm
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A seldom-seen side of comic genius Jonathan Winters, 1973
04.12.2013
02:37 pm
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There was not a lot of stuff that my father and I could agree on when I was growing up, but on the matter of Jonathan Winters (and Diana Rigg) we were in firm agreement. We both thought he was hysterical. To this day I have Winters’ zany flights of verbal fancy etched in my memory from listening to his comedy albums over and over again.

Today most people will remember Jonathan Winters from films like It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World, The Loved One (which he is amazing in) and The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming. Or his TV roles as “Mearth,” the alien son of Mork & Mindy and for his memorable appearances on The Dean Martin Celebrity Roasts and Johnny Carson’s Tonight Show.

The thing that virtually all of Winters’ TV and film appearances have in common is how OUT THERE and free-form his comedy was. Jonathan Winters, even into old age, was been known for his manic energy and indefatigable improvisational genius. You never, ever saw him in a quiet, contemplative mood, but for 30 minutes here, in this 1973 program from public television called Day at Night, you get to see a very different side of the comic genius. The host is public television pioneer James Day.

Talk about a dangerous mind, this is a delight.

Winters’ last album was the morbidly titled Final Approach.
 

Posted by Richard Metzger
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04.12.2013
02:37 pm
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When Nick Cave met Kylie: The ‘Where the Wild Roses Grow’ appreciation post
04.12.2013
01:58 pm
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You know when you get fanatically obsessed by a certain song and you can play it over and over and over again, nonstop, on repeat? Well, in my case, you can add a couple of dozens “overs” to get a sense of how often I’ve recently played “Where the Wild Roses Grow,” the duet between Nick Cave and Kylie Minogue from his 1996 Murder Ballads album.

To say I’ve been playing the shit out of this song (and Murder Ballads, one of the best albums in Cave’s nearly unbroken string of musical masterpieces) for the past few days would be an understatement (just ask my wife!) but chances are that if you’ve read this far, it’s about to be stuck in your head, too.

Not to rhapsodize too much about something you can simply hit play and experience for yourself, although it’s Cave’s song and well, totally his thing, it’s Kylie who shines here. Dig how perfect her performance is. She hits it so hard and so flawlessly that you can only imagine the junkie prince of darkness jumping for joy in the recording studio when they laid this performance to tape.

He’s great, he’s Nick fucking Cave, of course, but it’s Kylie the astonishing who steals the show here. Her vocal performance as Cave’s victim sounds so pure and innocent that it gives me goosebumps. According to Cave, they did no more than three takes.Why mess with perfection?
 
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First the stunning music video directed by Rocky Schenck. The imagery is based on the mid-19th century painting, “Ophelia” by Sir John Everett Millais, completed between 1851 and 1852. The painting depicts Hamlet‘s Ophelia singing in a river as she dies, and currently resides in the Tate Britain:
 

 
For her 2012 orchestral album, The Abbey Road Sessions, Minogue and Cave teamed up again to record this version of the song:
 

 
More Nick and Kylie after the jump…

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Posted by Richard Metzger
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04.12.2013
01:58 pm
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Dancing Queen does ‘The Bus Stop’
04.12.2013
01:41 pm
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Here’s a charming little video that will bring a ray of sunshine into a miserable day, and which fully displays the correct etiquette of “how to wait for a bus.”

Altogether now, in your best camp voice: “YOU GO GURL!”
 

 
via uploader Ben Easterbrook

Posted by Niall O'Conghaile
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04.12.2013
01:41 pm
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Hands up guys: Would you wear these WTF underpants?
04.12.2013
12:34 pm
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Rusty Blazenhoff over at Laughing Squid posted this rather perplexing men’s underwear-like garment which she appropriately called “one-sided grape smugglers.” I’m not a dude, but I’d imagine these must be quite uncomfortable, right?

I mean what is this? I don’t get it, but I am relieved that the model has either had a Brazilian wax or been carefully airbrushed.

Comes in blue, black, white, and red. The photos on the website selling these puppies are a bit more revealing than the ones I’ve posted here. I’ll just leave it at that. Proceed with caution if you’re at work!

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Posted by Tara McGinley
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04.12.2013
12:34 pm
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Sad footage of Sharon Tate’s funeral, 1969
04.12.2013
11:21 am
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One of the most somber scenes you’ll ever see, the raw film footage from the NBC News archives of Sharon Tate’s funeral. John and Michelle Phillips, Warren Beatty, Yul Brynner, Doris Tate and a visibly distraught Roman Polanski—he looks like he can barely stand and who could blame him—are seen.

Sharon Tate was interred in the Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California, with her unborn son, Paul Richard Polanski, cradled in her arms, on Wednesday, August 13, 1969. I can hardly imagine anything sadder than such an occasion.

The news report as it ran on NBC News can be seen here.
 

 
Thank you, Chris Campion

Posted by Richard Metzger
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04.12.2013
11:21 am
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‘One Nation Under A Groove’: a crash course in the history of Parliament-Funkadelic
04.12.2013
10:55 am
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Ain’t no party like a P-Funk party!
 
Calling all funkateers and cosmonauts! Wrap your peepers round this!

The history of Parilament-Funkadelic is sorely under-written. From their beginnings in 50s New Jersey, to their formative years in revolutionary 60s Detroit, from their glorious heyday in the 70s to their implosion in clouds of debt and cocaine in the early 80s, the P-Funk story is one of the most epic in all of popular music.

One Nation Under A Groove
may not be perfect, but it’s a start. I guess there’s just too many people and stories surrounding the band(s) to fit into one hour-long program, it would really need to be a mini-series, but ONUAG is a great introduction, essential viewing for anyone with an interest in the more out-there elements of popular culture.

George Clinton is heavily featured, of course, as are all the original members of The Parliaments (his barbershop doo-wop group that would go on to form the vocal nucleus of the Parliafunkadelicment thang) but there’s not enough Bootsy for my liking, and synth wizard Bernie Worrell, so fundamental to the establishment of this musical empire, is notably absent.

It goes without saying that I frikin LOVE this band. Or bands, whatever. P-Funk not only made some of the outright funkiest records of all time, but they also created an aesthetic world their fans could get completely emerged in. P-Funk to me is TRUE psychedelia, made all the more powerful by reflecting the outsider-ness of the black experience in America at the time. Surely just the very nature of the Parliament-Funkadelic—mixed race, gender, age, sexuality, etc, all united by the dance and the physical act of perspiring—is he essence of the liberal dream come to life? Historical documents about P-Funk are important not just ‘cos they were so awesome, but also for the generations born after the 1970s that discover P-Funk through the filter of G-Funk. Gangsta rap strip-mined P-Funk for the grooves but casually tossed aside the outsider elements that made the band(s) so vital, replacing them instead with a kind of coked-up, uber-macho, gang-colors conformity. It’s probably a post for another day, but I think Dr Dre/Death Row/et al robbed the funk of its freak flag. 

Anyway, if you want to know more about the history of Parilament-Funkadelic (and who doesn’t?!) let me point you in the direction of the book For The Record, George Clinton And P-Funk: In Their Own Words, which is the P-Funk story told by the band and crew members themselves, with refreshingly little editorial input. I recommend it very highly, but for now, and for the newcomers, dig this:
 

 

Posted by Niall O'Conghaile
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04.12.2013
10:55 am
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The agony and ecstasy of Tiny Tim: A remarkably candid interview with Morton Downey Jr.
04.12.2013
01:13 am
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Tiny Tim was born 81 years ago today.

In this clip from 1994, Morton Downey Jr. drops his usual maniacal bluster and manages to get up close and personal with Tiny Tim. The result is a compelling and at times grim interview.

Downey’s seedy bedroom manner lures Tiny into the confessional and the cuckolded singer doesn’t tiptoe through the tulips, he dives head first into the flower bed as he grapples with failed romance and fatherhood. The whole thing is more than just mildly creepy.

Two years after this was filmed, Tiny died of a heart attack at the age of 64. I doubt that he ever came to terms with the one thing that appeared to genuinely bewilder him in life: women.    
 

Posted by Marc Campbell
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04.12.2013
01:13 am
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The Weekend Starts Here: The Best of ‘60s Brit Pop from ‘Ready, Steady, Go!’
04.11.2013
07:52 pm
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This is what cultural revolution looked like in the early 1960s: youngsters dancing in a cramped television studio, as smartly dressed men and women mime love songs.

From its opening line: “The weekend starts here!” Ready, Steady, Go! was one of the most revolutionary and influential programs on British TV.

Between 1963 and 1966, Ready, Steady, Go! brought pioneering performances by the biggest pop names to millions of homes across the country. The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Dusty Springfield, Lulu, The Animals, Cilla Black, Gerry and The Pacemakers, The Searchers, and even Peter Cook & Dudley Moore—who later parodied the show in their film Bedazzled.

The miming eventually stopped in April 1965, after the show moved to a bigger studio and artists were asked to play live—most notably now legendary sets by The Who, Jimi Hendrix, Manfred Mann and The Walker Brothers. It gave the show an immediacy and power its rivals could only dream about, but by 1966, as the beat revolution moved on, Ready, Steady, Go! was canceled.

Ready, Steady, Go! had an unprecedented influence on shaping musical taste, and youth fashion, and in 2011, The Kinks’ Ray Davies paid homage to RSG! with a recreation of the show at the Meltdown Festival.
 

 

Posted by Paul Gallagher
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04.11.2013
07:52 pm
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Communication Breakdown: Japanese Led Zeppelin TV commercial, 1969
04.11.2013
04:51 pm
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Wonderful Japanese TV commercial for the first Led Zeppelin album. “Jimmy Pagi,” “Robert Planto,” kawaii (cute) John Paul Jones and John Bonham in their only TV spot.

Plus a promo film for “Communication Breakdown” that caught me totally by surprise:
 

Posted by Richard Metzger
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04.11.2013
04:51 pm
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