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Fractals: Hunting the Hidden Dimension
07.30.2011
12:50 am

Topics:
Art
Environment
Science/Tech

Tags:
Fractals


 
More goodness for you weekend hippies.

The Universe is psychedelic. Just take a look.

Or just close your eyes.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
‘Hofman’s Potion’: LSD now more than ever
07.29.2011
11:19 pm

Topics:
Belief
Drugs
History
Science/Tech

Tags:
LSD
Albert Hoffman


 
This wonderfully insightful documentary on one of the 20th centuries most significant discoveries will make you long for the day when pharmaceutical-quality LSD is once again made available to adults who want to experience it. As humanity seems to be on a de-evolutionary course, the responsible and conscious use of LSD may be one of the only genuinely effective antidotes to what ails us.

Forget Prozac, Klonapin, alcohol and TV, let’s legalize Hofman’s potion and re-awaken the beauty at the core of who we all are.

And for you naysayers who still think LSD was some badass hippie shit with little or no redeeming qualities, get off your computers now. Without acid, this technology we’re using at this very moment would probably not exist as it does in its present form. Suggested reading: click here.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
The Bloc rockin’ beats of Petr Novak
07.29.2011
04:16 pm

Topics:
History
Music
Pop Culture

Tags:
Petr Novak


 
A rock star and outspoken social critic in his homeland of Czechoslovakia, Petr Novak’s musical career was cut short by an oppressive political regime and his own self-destructiveness. In the 1960s and early 70s, Novak symbolized for Czech youth the free spirited hippie culture and surging rock rebellion rising up in Eastern Bloc countries. Novak became a threatening presence to the Communist invaders in the Prague Spring of 1969, a time when Novak was a high profile figurehead for change. He was considered by many to be a Czech John Lennon.

While Novak managed to exist within the parameters laid down by the conservative ruling class, his spirit had been shaken and he eventually descended into alcoholism and drug use. He continued to release albums of rapidly diminishing quality until his death in 1997 at the age of 52.

Novak was a huge fan of The Beatles and London’s pop scene and the English influences can be seen and heard in his fashion sense and music. In a ballsy move he actually named his first band The Beatles, which he later re-named George and The Beatovens.  But, Novak was something quite unique and comparisons to the British Invasion bands and the Mersey Sound are mostly superficial. Novak has more in common, to my ears, with French artists like Serge Gainsbourg, Jacque Brel and British crooners like Scott Walker and even David Bowie. There’s also gothic and progressive elements in his work that foreshadow bands like The Teardrop Explodes and Echo and The Bunnymen, the other Mersey sound.

Petr Novak operates in his own zone and I find his music and these videos compelling enough to wonder if it might not be a good time for a record label to release a compilation of his material. As it is, I can’t find any of his music other than on expensive out-of-print vinyl.

Here’s a short video history of Petr Novak. Some of the clips are visually quite stunning.
 

 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
The US debt: Who we owe (and who got us here in the first place) in a simple chart


 
Click here to see the full chart on the New York Times website.

A timely and handy chart for the understanding what’s going on with the deficit negotiations in Washington.

Remember that during the Clinton administration there was actually a SURPLUS coming in that went towards paying down the national debt. George Bush thought this was a bad thing—that the government shouldn’t be bagging surpluses—then promptly gave the average person the cost of a can of soda a day while giving billionaires major tax cuts and starting two costly wars. I think this chart makes it pretty obvious who fucked up this country. Who could deny otherwise? There’s no competition!

No wonder there’s nothing left for schools, roads, seniors, universal healthcare, the out of work and the sick… Isn’t this just infuriating?

H/T Joe.My.God.

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
How to put fire under a politician’s ass


 
Stencil spotted on the streets of Maryland.

(via High Definite)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Amazing photos of Iggy & the Stooges playing at a Michigan high school, 1970
07.29.2011
11:05 am

Topics:

Tags:
iggy pop
the stooges


 
Holy shit! If these classic shots of Iggy and the Stooges performing at Farmington High School in Oakland County, MI on December 5, 1970 don’t send a special thrill up your leg, there is nothing I can do for you, pal.

These shots were posted by Jim Edwards, lead singer of Michigan legends, The Rockets, on his Facebook page. Here’s what he wrote:

“I got these slides from a guy at work. He walks up to me and says, ‘You’re a musician, right? I got these old slides from a show at my high school, Wanna see ‘em?’ I held the first one up to the light and nearly shit myself!”

He must’ve used Kodachrome because these haven’t faded a bit. Also on the bill that night were headliners Mitch Ryder’s Detroit and a band called The Coming. This was James Williamson’s very first gig with The Stooges, at this point a quintet.
 

 

 
Iggy with split pants! If something like that happened today, he’d be in jail.
 

 
Above, a young James Williamson plays his first live gig with the Stooges.
 

 
Short-term Stooge Zeke Zettner on bass, Iggy and drummer Scott Asheton.
 

 
Above: What were these kids thinking?
 

 
A great shot of Ron Asheton.
 
Many more (and larger) photos at Jim Edwards’ Facebook page.

Thank you very kindly, Syd Garon!

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Grilled Friend in a Korma: Morrissey Eats Meat?


 
Now wouldn’t this be ironic, especially after his recent comments?

Back in March 1996 under the headline “Meat Is Magic!Select magazine ran a story that claimed celebrated vegetarian, “Mozzer eats meat!”

Morrissey eats meat?

Yes, Mozzer eats meat!

But how did they know?

How do we know? Because he does so at George & Niki’s in Camden. It’s also caff-by-appointment for Björk, Meanswear, Goldie and Blur…

George & Niki’s? What’s that then?

Forget The Good Mixer, George and Niki’s Golden Grill caff in the heart of cosmopolitan Camden has become the palatable place to be for London’s pop glitterati.

“There’s this place in America where the five states meet,” says George. “This is its London equivalent. we get regulars, nutters, kids and then we get the pop stars.”

The Golden Grill has stood on the same sight for 50 years - three generations of the Georgio family - serving roasts, fry-ups and quality vegetarian alternatives. Select, in an attempt to unveil the covert culinary habits of pop celebrity, spent an afternoon in the company of Niki, George and their rocker-coiffed assistant of 13 years, Vange (“Just call me Vange. That or Elvis.”) The results…

Vange: “Yeah, this bloke called Morris…Morris? The rocker bloke. Lovely man.”

Morrissey.

“That’s him! Comes in about once a month. A roast he has, yeah a roast dinner!”

Er…not the vegetarian option?

Vange: “Nah! Roast dinner. Lots of gravy.”

“Roast dinner”? “Lost of gravy”? Incredible. One can only imagine what the tabloids would do for a picture of Mozzer with his mouth chockfull with meat.

But surely Vange was obviously confusing Mozzer with er, Morris….Morris… Hm. Not many pop stars with Morris as a first name.

Click on the above image to see larger version of the article.
 
Previously on Dangerous Minds

Back to the nineties: Fabulous scans of ‘Select’ music magazine


Morrissey compares Norway massacre to KFC


 
With thanks to Tommy Udo and Tara McGinley
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Inception Orange
07.29.2011
10:27 am

Topics:
Food

Tags:
Inception
Oranges


 
Redditor canaznguitar says, “Found this orange growing inside my orange yesterday.”

It’s O R A N G E C E P T I O N!
 

 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Guest Editorial: Enter The Witch House


 
Bram E. Gieben (aka Texture) is the editor of the Edinburgh-based fiction/non-fiction website Weaponizer, and also co-founder of the net label Black Lantern Music. I asked him to write DM a primer on the genre “witch house”:

The Niallist (aka Niall O’Conghaile) asked me to write something about witch house, summing it up, providing a genre overview, and talking about some of the artists I’ve discovered over the last year or so. The problem is witch house is nothing like a traditional genre. It is not defined by a tempo, a style of production, a specific group of artists, a region or country or city, or any of the things one could use to pigeonhole, say, shoegaze, dubstep or hip-hop. Even the pool of influences from which it draws are so diverse as to stagger the mind of even the most ardent avant garde completist: witch house can (and does) sound like everything from experimental noise and drone to EBM and darkwave and aggrotech, from hip-hop to punk rock and black metal, often all at the same time.

Witch house is perhaps the first anti-genre, in that it has always actively resisted not just definition, but also detection. Much mockery has been made of artists spelling their band names with strange typographic symbols, but in the early days of witch house this had a specific intent: namely to create a ‘lexical darknet’ (to quote Warren Ellis, the comics writer and novelist whose blog posts led me to my first discoveries in the field), whereby fans had to use the specific symbols in the band names to locate their music online.

Witch house has incubated and mutated on free music sharing platforms such as Soundcloud and Bandcamp, and survives and breeds on private forums like www.witch-house.com, and on invite-only Facebook groups like Witchbook and Dior Nights, which use Facebook to run miniature secret societies and covens. These technologies (or services, however you want to define them) are core to the distribution of the music, but equally important have been the Tumblr and Vimeo platforms. The cut-and-paste ethos behind many witch house projects extends to their visuals, and the gifs, music videos and photo collages that populate artists’ feeds and channels are as much a part of the aesthetic of witch house as the music is.

The equal importance of visual and audio material helps us get closer to a definition of witch house: it is a mood or a feeling, the kind of atmosphere generated by the seminal Goblin’s soundtrack for ‘Suspiria,’ the creeping, schizophrenic suspense of the Laura Palmer mystery, or the Red Room at the heart of Twin Peaks, the final twenty minutes of The Wicker Man, or a basement rave in the house at the end of The Blair Witch Project. In repose, it generates an aura of ritual, darkness and suspense. In motion, it combines the glamour of fetish clubs and serial murder and hard drugs into an amoral dystopia of sound and vision.

Excited yet? You should be. Witch house is almost completely free from the constraints of mainstream hype - aside perhaps from the majestic witch pop of S4LEM, the mysterious feedback glyphs of WU LYF, and the luxurious electronic experimentation of Balam Acab, the three artists closest to crossing over into mainstream consciousness.
 

 
After the jump, the bands including Gummy Bear, Ritualz, Skeleton Kids, Fostercare, Gvcci Hvcci, Mater Suspiria Vision, oOoOO and many, many more.

Posted by Niall O'Conghaile | Leave a comment
Kubrick’s twisted dimensions: Why ‘The Shining’ is a masterful mindbender
07.28.2011
11:39 pm

Topics:
Design
Movies

Tags:
Stanley Kubrick
The Shining
Rob Ager


 
Rob Ager has no academic credentials in the realms of psychology or film making, but he clearly doesn’t need them. He has an incredible intuitive grasp of the links between celluloid and the subconscious mind. He’s not only a brilliant thinker, he’s a tenacious researcher. In this fascinating study of Stanley Kubrick’s disruption of spatial logic in order to create a sense of unease in his film The Shining, Ager gets at the heart of what makes the movie so spooky - the fact that it’s so fucking disorienting, an Escher-like maze of endless corridors drifting into infinity. A terrifying dream folding into itself. Jung would have loved this movie and Ager’s take on it.

Ager wrote, narrated and edited this outstanding analysis of Kubrick’s much-maligned vertiginous masterpiece.
 

 

 
Via Mister Honk

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
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