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Nico: Remembering the icon
07.19.2011
07:14 pm

Topics:
Fashion
Music
Pop Culture

Tags:
Nico
Nico Icon


 
Yesterday was the anniversary of Nico’s death at 49 (October 16 1938 – July 18 1988) and I had planned to commemorate it in some way last night, but it took me awhile to find this documentary. Thanks to Jonathan Sprig, my search ended this afternoon.

Nico Icon directed by Susanne Ofteringer is a compelling, intimate, often sad, but never judgmental, look at the life of the mysterious, seductive and self-destructive pop icon who kept the world at a distance while drawing us into her alluring web.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Rupert Murdoch eats foam rather than humble pie

image
 
It was a splatter of foam pie rather than any humble pie that Rupert Murdoch received today. It added a surreal touch to an odd day for the House of Commons Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee Hearing, where Rupert Murdoch at first came across as a seemingly frail Wizard of Oz. It was only his hand slamming the table in front of him that gave any hint this is a man used to getting his own way; a man who is rarely questioned, let alone cross examined by a round table of MPs, who were, let’s be fair, rather ineffectual.

Rupert was humbly evasive, while is son, James easily deflected questions, though he did admit the rather shocking news News International has been (and may still be) paying the legal fees of the phone hacking journalist Clive Goodman and private detective Glenn Mulcaire.

Then came the pie master, an alleged comedian called Johnnie Marbles, who may have delivered a better hit than any member of the Select Committee, but in doing so took away from the serious intent of the proceedings.
 

 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
William Burroughs’ curse on Truman Capote

Polaroid portraits of Truman Capote and William s. Burrooughs shot by Andy Warhol

There is a fascinating, well-researched article by Thom Robinson over at the might Reality Studio blog devoted to all things William S. Burroughs. Robinson is a British PhD candidate who has extensively researched Burroughs.

After setting up the backstory with anecdotes involving the mutual distaste that Burroughs (who apparently disliked effeminate homosexuals) felt for Capote (who might have snubbed Burroughs with Tennessee Williams and Paul Bowles in Tangier), Robinson relates the tale of a “curse” Burroughs placed on Capote’s literary talents in the form of an extraordinarily spiteful two-page “Open Letter to Truman Capote,” a copy of which now resides in the Burroughs Archive of the New York Public Library’s Berg Collection:

Burroughs’ “letter” begins with an explanation to Capote that his “is not a fan letter in the usual sense.” Acting as spokesman for a “department” with apparent responsibility for determining writers’ fates, Burroughs announces that he has followed Capote’s “literary development from its inception” and, in the line of duty, has conducted exhaustive inquiries comparable to those undertaken by Capote in his research for In Cold Blood. An engagingly surreal touch finds Burroughs reporting that these inquiries have included interviewing all of Capote’s fictional characters “beginning with Miriam” (the title character of Capote’s breakthrough story of 1945). Referring to “the recent exchange of genialities” between Capote and Kenneth Tynan, Burroughs concludes that Tynan “was much too lenient.” Going one step further than Tynan and accusing Capote of acting as an apologist for hard-line methods of police interrogation (and thus supporting those “who are turning America into a police state”), Burroughs next turns to the question of Capote’s writing abilities. Avowing that Capote’s early short stories were “in some respects promising,” Burroughs suggests Capote could have made positive use of his talents, presumably by applying them to the expansion of human consciousness (“You were granted an area for psychic development”). Instead, Burroughs finds that Capote has sold out a talent “that is not yours to sell.” In retribution for having misused “the talent that was granted you by this department”, Burroughs starkly warns “That talent is now officially withdrawn,” signing off with the sinister admonition, “You will never have anything else. You will never write another sentence above the level of In Cold Blood. As a writer you are finished.”

It should be noted that, at the time of writing, Burroughs was a credulous believer in the efficacy of curses (famously believing he had successfully used tape recorders to close down a London restaurant where he had received bad service). Regardless of how seriously Burroughs intended his prediction for Capote’s future, his words proved eerily prescient. After the publication of In Cold Blood, Capote announced work on an epic novel entitled Answered Prayers, intended as a Proustian summation of the high society world to which he had enjoyed privileged access over the previous decades. The slim existing contents were eventually published posthumously while one of the few extracts which saw publication within Capote’s lifetime notoriously employed Capote’s habit of indiscretion to disastrous effect. When “La Côte Basque, 1965″ was published by Esquire in 1975, Capote’s betrayal of the confidences of friends (who recognized the identities lurking beneath the veneer of fictionalized characters) resulted in swift exile from the celebrity world which Capote had courted for much of his career.

Given Burroughs’ curse on Capote, it is interesting to note that, in the years before his death, Capote’s dismissive views on Burroughs’ work became even more damning: “Norman Mailer thinks William Burroughs is a genius, which I think is ludicrous beyond words. I don’t think William Burroughs has an ounce of talent.” By the time these remarks were recorded by Lawrence Grobel in Conversations with Capote, successful canvassing by Mailer among others had resulted in Burroughs’ admission to the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters in 1983. After a long decline, wrought by the inability to break a harrowing cycle of alcohol and barbiturate abuse, Capote died the following year at the age of 59.

In Cold Blood: William Burroughs’ Curse on Truman Capote (Reality Studio)

Thank you Celia Rimell

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Subliminal horns on Rupert Murdoch during testimony
07.19.2011
12:41 pm

Topics:
Current Events

Tags:
Rupert Murdoch


 
Apparently these photos were taken right after the pie incident today.

(via TDW)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Handy Chart: Know Your Weed
07.19.2011
12:11 pm

Topics:
Drugs

Tags:
weed
Marijuana


 
Here’s helpful chart to identify certain strains of marijuana. While I do agree with the majority of photos represented, I have some reservations about the GDP (Grand Daddy Purple). GDP usually has a nice purplish tint to it. Also, the smell test usually wins every time when one can’t identify a certain strain. So says she who would know…

Click on the chart above to see larger version.

(via reddit)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Robot band covers Marilyn Manson’s ‘The Beautiful People’


 
I blogged about EOL (End of Life) robot band’s cover of the B-52’s “Rock Lobster” here on Dangerous Minds before. Now EOL is back again with its cover of Manson’s “The Beautiful People.” The “Rock Lobster” cover is still superior in my humble opinion, but this is pretty cool. 

 
(via Mister Honk)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Actual Audio: Eric Cantor on taxes
07.19.2011
11:00 am

Topics:
Class War
Politics
Stupid or Evil?

Tags:
Eric Cantor


 
Is there even one single member of Congress less sincere-seeming than House Majority Leader, Rep. Eric Cantor of Virginia? If there is, I can’t think of who that might be.

Cantor’s the most transparently phony and least-charming politician on the national stage today. Everything that comes out of his mouth sounds like he doesn’t believe it himself. I have to turn the channel when I see his face. Yuck. How did a punk like him get to be so powerful? He’s been elected six times. Is the field so shitty in Virginia that Eric Cantor is the best the state can muster? That’s pathetic.
 

 
Via Daily Kos

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Liar, Liar: Garage rockers The Castaways in ‘It’s a Bikini World’
07.19.2011
10:45 am

Topics:
Music
One-hit wonders

Tags:
The Castaways


 
Minneapolis garage rockers The Castaways performing their hit “Liar, Liar” in the 1967 “feminist” beach movie, It’s a Bikini World.. The song reached #12 in the charts in 1965.  Dig this guy’s falsetto! Plus you get a real boss go-go dancer. What’s not to love here?

“Liar, Liar” was covered by Debbie Harry in the 80s. The Castaways original was later used on the soundtrack to Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels.
 

 
Thank you Douglas Hovey!

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
‘Who Are the Mystery Girls?’: New York Dolls, live 70s video
07.19.2011
10:11 am

Topics:
History
Music

Tags:
Bob Gruen
New York Dolls


 
A classic 70s Dolls performance caught by ace rock photographer Bob Gruen. Here the lipstick killers do “Who Are the Mystery Girls?’’ at The Matrix in San Francisco.

Thank the gods Gruen had his video camera trained on the New York Dolls in their prime. Because of him, moments like this exist for posterity. Video cameras were rare at that time and this video was no doubt shot on the ancient half-inch open reel format. Compared to today’s HD cameras, lugging something like that around would be like strapping a vacuum cleaner to your back. Very unwieldy beasties they were.
 

 
Thank you Douglas Hovey!

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Sister Sunshine’s rant about homosexual history being taught in California schools


 
Yes, Sister Sunshine, I think you’re on to something. The next step IS for the California school system to educate our children about folks who like to have sex with chickens. Good grief. 

 
(via BuzzFeed)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
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