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Oddly phallic 1960s crochet wedding dress
01.04.2013
03:23 pm

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Amusing
Fashion

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Looking like a knitted cozy for a dildo, this spectacular wedding dress was made some time in the 60s.

Update: It’s an Yves Saint Laurent dress from 1965. 

Via Retronaut

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Led Zeppelin vs Beatles: ‘Whole Lotta Helter Skelter’
01.04.2013
01:57 pm

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Music

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I know, I know, the clichéd mashup… However, this one is kinda fun.

Music and video by Soundhog.
 

 
Via Nerdcore

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Spooky, aggressive New Wave weirdness: I’m in love with 2-piece band, The Garden
01.04.2013
09:36 am

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Punk

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And lookat ‘em! They’re like little twin baby Richard Hells!
 
I’m a total sucker for anything from Burger Records.  It seems like every few weeks I can pop in and find a new awesome band. Their bread and butter (and what initially drew me to the label), tends to be a lot of self-referential punk and/or garage, so when I first heard The Garden, I was taken aback by the jarring earful of bass and drums.

Brothers Wyatt and Fletcher Shears manage an odd balance of murky, spastic, and mean. The vocals flux from convulsive to crooning, sometimes in the same song (most of which are under 60 seconds long).

It’s like if a minimalist David Byrne got into hardcore and surf… or something. The effect is jarring, but cool. Like, Karen O cool. Like, Bauhaus cool. Borderline too cool. I mean, I don’t look good in black and I’m not very good at “careless indolence” these days, but damn if it doesn’t get you in the mood to try!

They’ve got a few tracks up on YouTube, and are soon to release their second cassette on Burger, which I eagerly await.
 

 

Posted by Amber Frost | Leave a comment
Man Machine: The mechanical biology of Fritz Kahn
01.04.2013
09:30 am

Topics:
Art
Science/Tech

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His explanation of male arousal is my favorite.
 
Born in 1888, Dr. Fritz Kahn was an actual Gynecologist, who just happened to have a flare for art. His interpretations of mechanized human anatomy are as striking as they are fascinating, as gears and pipes disrupt bodies that have been rendered all but biological.

Kahn a Jew, was expelled from his native Germany not long after some of his work gained notoriety. His books were even burned and banned by the Nazis, with one edition surviving under a fake name, after the addition of an anti-Semitic chapter.

Kahn eventually escaped to the U.S. and continued a successful career as an author until his death in 1968. His work has recently been collected in the book, Man Machine, showing the growth and evolution of his perceptions of the body.
 
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“Man as Industrial Palace”
 
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Vision compared to photography technology
 
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The nervous system as an office

Posted by Amber Frost | Leave a comment
The Navy’s ‘Bath Salts’ PSA: ‘It’s not a fad…It’s a NIGHTMARE’
01.03.2013
09:52 pm

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Amusing
Drugs

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Everyone is mocking the Navy’s anti “Bath Salts” video like it’s the new Reefer Madness, but I must say, this is exactly what the experience was like for me! Dubstep, reptilian beings, bowling alleys, all of it.

Seems pretty obvious to me that someone in the Navy did a lil’ research on research chemicals, don’t cha think?
 

 
Thank you, Rod Stanley!

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Lindsay Kemp’s ‘Flowers’: A legendary dance production inspired by Jean Genet’s novel
01.03.2013
06:48 pm

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Art
Dance
Heroes
Music
Pop Culture
Punk
Queer
Sex

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Jean Genet wrote Our Lady of the Flowers while in prison in 1942. It was published anonymously the following year, and sold around 30 copies. It wasn’t until after the Allied Forces liberated France in 1944 that the bulk of the copies were bound and sold.

Due to its sexual content Our Lady of the Flowers was sold as high class erotica, but Genet never intended it as such. It would take until the book had been revised and reprinted by Gallimard in 1951 that Our Lady of the Flowers received the critical accolades it richly deserved - even if Jean-Paul Sartre described it as “the epic of masturbation.”

It was an over-the-wall conversation with a neighbor that led Lindsay Kemp to create and produce his now legendary dance production of Flowers in 1974. As Lindsay recounted to Dangerous Minds last year:

‘I’d just rented a little cottage, a country retreat, in Hungerford in Berkshire, and my next door neighbor - it was one Sunday morning and we were listening to Round the Horne, we all did on those Sunday mornings - and my neighbor across the fence leaned over and said.

“Oh hi, I think this book might interest you.”

And it was Genet’s Our Lady of the Flowers. And I began to read it, and as soon as I began to read it I could already see it on the stage, and I could see myself as Divine, the central character. And two weeks later, we opened it.

Only someone of Kemp’s incredible talents and vision could have produced Flowers, and the production put Kemp and his dance company literally “on the map.” Since then, Kemp and Co. have performed Flowers all across the world to incredible acclaim.

In 1982, a video was made of the Lindsay Kemp Dance Company performing Flowers at the Teatro Parioli, Roma. It is rarely been seen since, and the video is a incredible treat for anyone interested in dance, performance and theater.
 

 
Previously on Dangerous Minds

Lindsay Kemp is on the ‘phone: Scenes from his life from Genet to Bowie

 

Lindsay Kemp: Seldom seen interview about his production of ‘Salome’ from 1977

 

David Bowie and Lindsay Kemp’s rarely seen production ‘Pierrot in Turquoise’ from 1968


 
With thanks to Lindsay Kemp’s Last Dance
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Robert Anton Wilson on Aleister Crowley
01.03.2013
05:53 pm

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Heroes
Occult

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Perhaps this will only prove of interest to really hardcore Crowley buffs (and not necessarily RAW fans who aren’t Crowley nuts) but this is, for sure, the best Bob Wilson interview on the topic of Aleister Crowley that I’ve ever heard.

I’m pretty sure this comes from the CD box set of interviews with Wilson, Robert Anton Wilson Explains Everything: (or Old Bob Exposes His Ignorance) that came out in 2005.
 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Chuck Berry reviews Sex Pistols, Talking Heads, Clash and many more, 1980
01.03.2013
02:25 pm

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Music
Punk

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Chuck Berry & Debbie Harry.
 
Chuck Berry interviewed by punk zine Jet Lag in 1980. Berry shares his thoughts about “what the kids are listening to these days.”
 

The Sex Pistols’ “God Save the Queen”:

What’s this guy so angry about anyway? Guitar work and progression is like mine. Good backbeat. Can’t understand most of the vocals. If you’re going to be mad at least let the people know what you’re mad about.

 

The Clash’s “Complete Control”:

Sounds like the first one. The rhythm and chording work well together. Did this guy have a sore throat when he sang the vocals?

 

The Ramones’ “Sheena is a Punk Rocker”:

A good little jump number. These guys remind me of myself when I first started, I only knew three chords too.

 

The Romantics’ “What I Like About You”:

Finally something you can dance to. Sounds a lot like the sixties with some of my riffs thrown in for good measure. You say this is new? I’ve heard this stuff plenty of times. I can’t understand the big fuss.

 

Talking Heads’ “Psycho Killer”:

A funky little number, that’s for sure. I like the bass a lot. Good mixture and a real good flow. The singer sounds like he has a bad case of stage fright.


Wire’s “I Am the Fly” and Joy Division’s Unknown Pleasures:

So this is the so-called new stuff. It’s nothing I ain’t heard before. It sounds like an old blues jam that BB and Muddy would carry on backstage at the old amphitheatre in Chicago. The instruments may be different but the experiment’s the same.

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Click here to see larger image.
 
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Click here to see larger image.
 
H/T WFMU and Music Ruined My Life

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Fear frontman Lee Ving sings show tune on TV’s ‘Fame’
01.03.2013
02:24 pm

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Music
Punk
Television

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Fear’s Lee Ving sings Man From La Mancha tearjerker “The Impossible Dream” on a 1984 episode of TV show Fame and for a brief ugly moment the universe gags on its own vomit.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Mashable’s Top 10 Most Influential People on Facebook: George Takei, Barack Obama and… ME?
01.03.2013
01:53 pm

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Pop Culture

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That’s what they tell me... and who am I to argue?

This certainly caused much laughter around Dangerous Minds HQ, today.

4. Richard Metzger

No other individual has done more to sully Facebook’s name, for better or worse, over Promoted Posts than Richard Metzger.

Metzger became the face of the anti-Promoted Posts crusade after penning a lengthy post on the blog Dangerous Minds accusing Facebook of holding his audience reach ransom for the sake of making a quick buck.

In his Oct. 24 post, Metzger detailed how the Facebook page for Dangerous Minds had been steadily growing in the number of likes. Despite the new followers, the page was reaching less and less of them. Metzger blamed Promoted Posts.

“It’s perhaps the most understated stick-up line in history,” he wrote, “worthy of a James Bond villain calmly demanding that a 365 million dollar ransom gets collected from all the Mom & Pop businesses who use Facebook.”

The company responded by stating the changes were a result of EdgeRank, their ever-evolving proprietary algorithm that aims to bring only the best to a user’s newsfeed. Despite these claims to the contrary, anti-Promoted Posts sentiment has spread. In addition to the aforementioned Metzger and Takei, Dallas Mavericks owner and entrepreneur Mark Cuban has also criticized Facebook over the maligned feature.

You’ll note that I placed before both God and Mike Huckabee... just sayin’.
 
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Graphic by Dimitri Drujchin, original photo Guillaume Paumier

Thank you, Kartik Dayanand Boddapati!

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
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