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Intoxica Radio Xmas Show! Wild Unknown Rock-n-Roll, Soul, R & B!
12.25.2014
09:28 am

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Music

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Intoxica Radio

kjrtypreh
 
Now in its ninth year, Intoxica Radio has continually brought the masses the weirdest and wildest assortment of ultra rare original 45 RPM records. Here is this year’s Christmas show and it doesn’t fail! Dance the holiday away with this rockin’ frenzy!

For those that need to know in advance, or keep score you can find the playlist for this show or listen here.
 

 

Posted by Howie Pyro | Discussion
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Syn & Synthesizers: Fake 70s-era pr0n magazines for men who love their synths
12.24.2014
09:46 am

Topics:
Music
Sex

Tags:
Synthesizers


 
I’ve seen these amusing synth / nudie mag images floating around Tumblr and Pinterest for sometime now, but never knew who was behind them. Now I know: Artist Rachel Laine created these fictious “naughty” magazine covers for the Bedroom Cassette Masters project. (Music in-the-style-of lo-fi, cassette-based, bedroom-recorded demos.)

I was asked to imagine a series of seventies-era magazines aimed at young men seriously into synthesizers and electronic organs which would all betray their sexist origins by their covers!

Damn, I really wish these were the real deal. I’d be on eBay buying ‘em up in 3…2…1…

Titles and article text written by Simon Holland (the mastermind behind the project) and Dave Williams. 


 

 
More after the jump…
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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Some holiday cheer from Suicide
12.24.2014
09:41 am

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Amusing
Music
Punk

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Suicide
ZE Records


 
Thanks to the oft-repeated (but totally incorrect) factoid holding that the rate of people opting to end their own lives spikes during the winter holidays, many of us associate Christmas with suicide, but I don’t think this is what anyone has in mind: the assaultive, proto punk, electronics-and-misanthropy duo Suicide released not one, but two Christmas songs. Sort of. We’ll sort out the messy details in a bit.
 

 
In 1981, the great no-wave label ZE Records—home to the eardrum-hurty likes of Lydia Lunch and Arto Lindsay—decided that the label would release A Christmas Record, a compilation of original Christmas music by its deeply underground artists. It seems, and was, pretty ridiculous, but that album yielded an actual enduring holiday season classic in the Waitresses’ “Christmas Wrapping.” Other artists who contributed were Material with Nona Hendryx, Cristina, and Was (Not Was). It was and remains deeply regrettable that Lydia Lunch contributed no Christmas song, but there was one by the equally malevolent Suicide, and another by that band’s singer Alan Vega. (Here’s the “sort of” alluded to above: both the Suicide track and the Vega “solo” track bear the songwriting credits and synthesizers of Suicide’s other half, Martin Rev. So I completely don’t get how the Vega song isn’t a Suicide song in reality if not in name. If it waddles and quacks…)

Here’s the Suicide cut, “Dear Lord.” It’s pretty messed up. I especially dig the chimes.
 

 
Vega’s “solo” track, “No More Christmas Blues,” featured the same music bed, with somewhat different dithering, moaned lyrics. When A Christmas Record was re-pressed in 1982, this was left off in favor of James White’s “Christmas With Satan,” but it was restored to the 2004 CD reissue, Xmas Record Reloaded.
 

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Discussion
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Party out of bounds on a wild planet 52 miles west of Venus: Early B-52s concert
12.24.2014
09:39 am

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Music

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The B-52s


Cindy Wilson looking pretty in pink

Here’s my Xmas present to you: A full B-52s concert from 1980 taped on November 7th at the Capitol Theatre in Passaic, NJ with three cameras and sound off the board.

This was an excellent time to see the B-52s. They were so young and enthusiastic here during their first tour as headliners right after their second album had been released. They play all of Wild Planet and most of their debut, too.

Setlist:
0:00:00 - “Lava”
0:05:05 - “Give Me Back My Man”
0:09:27 - “6060-842”
0:12:20 - “Devil In My Car”
0:17:09 - “52 Girls”
0:20:54 - “Quiche Lorraine”
0:25:12 - “Dirty Back Road”
0:28:23 - “Private Idaho”
0:32:21 - “Strobe Light”
0:36:37 - “Runnin’ Around”
0:39:54 - “Rock Lobster”
0:45:04 - “Dance This Mess Around”
0:49:16 - “Planet Claire”
0:53:50 - “Party Out Of Bounds”
0:57:06 - “Downtown”
0:59:50 - “53 Miles West Of Venus”

The entire thing is great, great, great but the synthesizer solo in “Strobe Light” had me grinning from ear to ear.
 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Discussion
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Garage Rock Madness with The Muppets first Ed Sullivan appearance, 1966
12.24.2014
08:30 am

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Music
Television

Tags:
Ed Sullivan
The Muppets


 
Garage rock and Muppet history was made on September 18, 1966 as this date marked the first television appearance on CBS-TV’s The Ed Sullivan Show of Jim Henson’s Muppets. This is long before the Muppets became an institution, this is back when they were just an act. They were thereafter featured on the show regularly until it ended in 1971. For this first appearance, Henson chose a demented and pretty savage pure 1966 garage rock song called “Rock It To Me” by a teen band comprised of four actual brothers (Alf, Frank, Mike, and Joe Delia) from Pearl River, New York, amazingly called The Bruthers. The Bruthers had a great 45 on RCA Records this same year called “Bad Way To Go” backed with “Bad Love.” The A-side was included on influential, early 80’s garage compilation LP Pebbles Volume 8 and was a big hit with the new generation of sixties garage fanatics.
 
kjgfvhligvo
 
The Bruthers were managed by famous New York promoter Sid Bernstein, and also rumor has it, Ed Sullivan himself. Either way it couldn’t have been more perfect. This insane song has never surfaced outside of this clip, not even on the compilation of unreleased Bruthers material on Sundazed Records.

Sullivan introduced the sketch by showing the audience a present that the Muppets had given him, an instant rock and roll group in a box. He takes it out and places it on a table where the group grows from a small fuzzball into the three-headed rock and roll monster (with built-in guitars and drums). After the monster plays the song, it shrinks back to its original form and is eaten by the character Sour Bird.

In the original footage, Ed Sullivan intro’d this as “Jim Newsome’s Puppets,” but this was later overdubbed.
 

 

Posted by Howie Pyro | Discussion
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Having a soulful Christmas with Martin Mull
12.24.2014
07:02 am

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Amusing
Music

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Christmas
Martin Mull


 
Before he became a TV star playing a smarmy wifebeater on Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman, Martin Mull was primarily a musician who made comedy records. You know “Dueling Banjos” from Deliverance? Mull’s take on the tune, “Dueling Tubas,” reached #93 on the Billboard chart in 1973.

Later that year, Mull took another shot at the big time with a novelty Christmas record. “Santafly,” sung in falsetto over a backing track that crudely approximates Curtis Mayfield, celebrates Santa in the style of a blaxploitation theme song. “He knows if you’ve been bad or good, so be superbad for goodness’ sake,” sing the backing vocalists. Under my roof, we don’t listen to Andy Williams during the holidays. We listen to this two-minute throwaway over and over, until we start to feel ill, to remind us of the true meaning of Christmas.

In the mid-90s, Sonic Youth released an utterly brain-damaged version of the single’s B-side, “Santa Doesn’t Cop out on Dope.” Mull’s original is here.
 

 

 

Posted by Oliver Hall | Discussion
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Ghostface Killah live at ‘Toastface Grillah’ (plus free grilled cheese sandwiches)
12.23.2014
11:14 am

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Food
Music

Tags:
Ghostface Killah
grilled cheese
Wu-Tang Clan


 
There’s a grilled cheese restaurant in Perth, Australia called Toastface Grillah, in obvious homage to Wu-Tang Clan member Ghostface Killah. This past Sunday Ghostface performed in the back alley behind the restaurant to a throng of delighted fans (who also got to eat grilled cheese sandwiches—total win-win).
 

 
According to a redditor named enigma2g, Ghostface “did an interview on an Australian radio station called Triple J and the host told him about the shop, Ghost replied by saying ‘I might go check that out.’ Pretty cool that he did.” Indeed.
 

 
Here’s Ghostface Killah live at Toastface Grillah singing “Wu-Tang Clan Ain’t Nuthing ta Fuck Wit” and “C.R.E.A.M.,” both off of their 1993 debut album Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers):
 

 
via HUH.

Posted by Martin Schneider | Discussion
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Read a sweet 1982 love letter written by Jerry Garcia to Vogue cover model
12.22.2014
12:18 pm

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Music

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Grateful Dead
Jerry Garcia


Jerry Garcia by Dean Russo

A two-part love letter written by Jerry Garcia in 1982 to an (unnamed) former Vogue cover model—who Garcia had met at a party in New York in 1980 while the Grateful Dead were playing Radio City Music Hall—will be offered up for auction next month. The first part was written between late May to early June 1982, but is not dated. Neither is the second part, but since it refers to the royal birth of Prince William on June 21, 1982 and was postmarked on the following day, that would seem to narrow it down a bit.

The letter also includes a sketch of a Dead show at the Greek Theatre. From a detailed description at RR Auction.com:

“Thank you really for sending that postcard, I feel like it’s sort of our first ‘official’ communication somehow. I’ve been hoping we could get together ever since we first met at Al’s that winter nite so long ago (sigh)…However it seems as tho…(Hey! My pen stopped writing) I’ve been ninety degrees off or out of phase or something whenever it might have been possible to get to know you a little better. I hope it doesn’t seem like I’ve been avoiding you, although I admit I’ve kind of been waiting for the opportunity (that is, the ‘right’ opportunity) for us to meet in some kind of neutral context that would be comfortable and relaxed and free of any pressure. Of course it could be years before any such opportunity arises, so…this is just a long winded way of saying thank you for writing. Oh! also in spite of never having been alone with you, I somehow feel close to you and I’ve looked forward to and enjoyed those times, however brief, that we have been in the same general vicinity and spoken slightly (New York, Germany, Calif etc.) you know—so…

The Grateful Dead just played our first outdoor show of the year at a place called the Greek Theatre (a nice amphitheatre in back of The University of Calif. in Berekley [sic] kind of like this).”

Here, Garcia draws a sketch of their performance at the Greek Theatre:
 

 
He continues, writing:

“A really nice site, we played for three days and the weather was really delicious although the last day (Sunday) was the beginning of a short hot spell and was a trifle uncomfortable but it was nice to play outdoors. I’m going to be playing in and around New York in June (while you’re in London naturally) and I’m sorry I’ll be missing you again: write me more, if you like that is, and thank you again for the card.”

Garcia adds “P.S., Pardon my handwriting, this is the first letter I’ve written in years.”

Then there is a second part, written on Hotel Parker Meridien letterhead. In full:

“Now, weeks later I’m in N.Y.C. Received your 2nd postcard (gasp) and I’m just getting (that is) around to mailing my first letter. Partly, it’s a sort of mail fright, like stage fright and partly editorial misgivings (Let’s see, is it legible? Spelled correctly? Am I constructing these sentences properly? God I hope she doesn’t think I’m an idiot for running off at the pen like this) Oh well—I’ve always wanted to visit Ireland. Hope you enjoyed it & I hope this letter finds you well. The whole Falkland thing here became really creepy (for me) when Begin explained & excused Israel’s invasion of Lebanon by comparing the situation to the British position in Falklands. The whole business scared the hell out of me. Latest news from England is of course the Royal birth. I’ll bet the locals are enjoying it immensly [sic].

I’m on the road again. This time with my own band & also doing some more of those two piece shows (me and John Kahn) (bass). I’ve done a few more of them since I last saw you and am starting to adjust to and become aware of the musical possibillitys [sic] of that acoustical format. It’s exciting tho still scary. I wish you were here now that I’ve got a little time here (for once) but… bye for now.”

There’s something quite endearing about Garcia sheepishly admitting to a form of stage fright with letter writing. He even waited so long to send it that he added a second part. Cute. The auction house claims that there is no other known letter by Garcia to be found in the marketplace, let alone one demonstrating his charming seduction technique.

You can see larger images of the entire letter at RR Auction.
 

 
Via MOJO4music

Posted by Richard Metzger | Discussion
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‘Ideal’ creator Graham Duff’s epic best albums of 2014 megapost
12.22.2014
08:42 am

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Music

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Graham Duff
Best of 2014


‘Graham Duff With Night Demons’ (2014).  Acrylic on canvas by Val Denham.

He’s back! Once again, we’re thrilled to present a year-end musical round-up from Graham Duff. Graham is the creator of Ideal, the cult hit dark comedy that ran for seven series on BBC Three (before some fucking idiot cancelled it). He is a well-known music fanatic and personally selected Ideal‘s eclectic soundtrack. Seen in a small role in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows as a “Death Eater,” he is currently working on an Ideal feature film.


30. The Vacant Lots - Departure

The reference points are obvious; the pared back organ driven throb of Suicide and the mesmeric cyclical guitar riffs of Spacemen 3 or Loop. With their minimal lyrics and off the peg titles like “Never Satisfied” and “Do Not Leave Me Now,” it would be easy to dismiss The Vacant Lots as merely men mining an overfamiliar seam. However, at its best, their’s is a debut which burns with an iridescent light. This is a direct and uncluttered music that plugs right into the primal heart of rock and roll.
 

29. Esperik Glare, Tactile - Abyssophonics

A subtle and sympathetic collaboration between Charlie Martineau’s Esperik Glare and the multi-talented and now sadly departed John Everall AKA Tactile. The album comprises four lengthy minimal and uneasy instrumentals. “The Dweller” fizzes with elemental energy. On “The Thing In The Pit,” a nervously fluttering electronic pulse is pierced by high pitched darts of sound. Best of all is the slowly shifting “The Psychophage.” A beautifully sustained sequence of grainy washes of noise underscored by a bass tone which flickers like helicopter blades in a heat haze.
 

28. Snowbird - Moon

Former Cocteau Twin Simon Raymonde teams up with Wisconsin vocalist and pianist Stephanie Dosen to fashion an album of delicate mystery.  There are numerous moments—on the spacious beauty of “All Wishes Are Ghosts,” or the bucolic “Where Foxes Hide”—which could almost be the Cocteau Twins circa Four Calendar Café. However, rather than aping Elizabeth Fraser’s gravity defying voice, Dosen’s serene tone recalls the stylings of 70s psych/folk artist Linda Perhacs and Raymonde’s luminous arrangements are more sparse and sleek than those of his previous group.  The accompanying remix album by RxGibbs opens the material out into even more intriguing vistas of sound
 

27. Cyclobe - Sulphur-Tarot-Garden

Conceived as soundtracks for three short films by Derek Jarman, this is Cyclobe’s Ossian Brown and Stephen Thrower at their most Kraut-rock inflected. Both “Sulphur” and “Garden of Luxor” bring to mind the lush textures of early Cluster, whereas the slow, opiated spiral of “Tarot” shimmers into view like a 21st century Tangerine Dream. However, Cyclobe bring so much more to their rich sonic mix. Finally seeing a general release after 2012’s strictly limited run, this is a deeply psychedelic LP. 
 

26. Then Thickens - Death Cap at Anglezarke

The oddly named Then Thickens have hit the ground running. This is an unusual debut which seems to stand apart from any genre. Songs like “Tiny Legs” and “Death Cap” meld a strong pop sensibility to an unforced strangeness. With their muscular band dynamic and lyrics which seem to be simultaneously confessional and oblique, the group they most closely resemble is the long lost Scottish band Dawn of the Replicants. It would be a shame if Then Thickens were to suffer the same lack of attention which befell that ensemble, because this is a vibrant and at times thrilling set.
 

25. People Like Us - Don’t Think Right, It’s All Twice

PLU (aka Vicki Bennett) is a transformative artist. Shunning copyright laws, she deliberately samples the most familiar, over worked and banal of source material, then refashions it into something unique and uncategorizable. There’s a large dose of humour in PLU’s work—which at times approaches a kind of audio slapstick. But don’t let the comedy blind you to her razor sharp intelligence. A track like “Panic As Usual And Avoid Shopping” will make you smile even as it gives you goose bumps.
 

24. Robin Saville - Public Flowers

As one half of electronic duo Isan, Robin Saville has a sizeable catalogue of excellent albums and EPs behind him.  Here, on his first solo outing, he creates a collection of gentle electronic watercolours, where simple synth patterns blend with subtly mixed rural field recordings. “Hilary And Dave’s Piano #2” is an exquisite minimal piano piece, with sparse notes falling like jewels from a cloud of warm synth tone. Saville’s best track is probably the closing “All Fail Girl”—an optimistic spray of colour and light, where a stripped down clockwork rhythm provides the base for a blooming moss garden of melodic curlicues.
 

23. The Iceypoles - My World Was Made for You

A collection of songs which at a cursory listen could easily be dismissed as twee and cloying. But repeated exposure reveals a genuine emotional depth. This Melbourne four piece’s debut is a flawless piece of intimate, stripped down girl group indie. Songs are built from the sparest of ingredients; skeletal guitar and bass figures, snare and occasional organ.  Where the band really shine is with their warm vocal harmonies.  And yet it’s not all sweetness and light. On “Happy Birthday” there’s a breathy sensuality which takes the album in a different direction. And their version of the Twin Peaks soundtrack song “Just You” is the icing on the cake.
 

22. Scott Walker Scott Walker + Sunn O))) - Soused

As we have come to expect from both late period Walker and all period Sun O))), this is a pitch black and monolithically slow moving suite of songs. And whilst it would be great to think Walker would occasionally experiment with some brighter emotions, nobody does dread and unease quite like him. Similarly Sun O)))’s mastery of the drone and the power chord is unparalleled. “Brando” is probably the high point, with Walker’s distinctive brooding baritone weaving its own path over rich, tense slabs of noise which grind against each other creating dark sparks.
 

21. Githead - Waiting for a Sign

A polished and considered third album from Githead shows the band refining their sound. The low-slung menace of fuzz drenched opener “Not Coming Down” immediately hooks you in with its combination of art-pop and shoegaze. Yet Malka Spigel’s vocals refuse the easy blissed out vagaries of the average shoegazer for something far more pointed and personal.  The mood slides from optimistic to introspective and, as always with Githead, there are surprises to be had. “For The Place We’re In” actually has a folk-psych tinge with echoes of Family or Camel.
 

20. Morgan Delt - Morgan Delt

A lo-fi collection of pop-psych songs which boast the assured dynamics of Tame Impala and the smeary fuzzed out harmonies of early Ariel Pink. Many of Delt’s songs have an endearing Byrds-like jangle, but the Eastern phrasing of “Barbarian Kings” and the frenetic wig out of “Backwards Bird Inc.” prove there are numerous influences at play here. This is harmonious and pure hearted pop pitched into an opiated fog of effects peddles and stoned bedroom studio techniques. To his credit, Delt makes it all sound very natural and effortless and it’s easy to see how he could blossom into a major talent.
 
Read more after the jump…
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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At long last, Paul Stanley’s ridiculous Folgers coffee commercial surfaces
12.21.2014
12:39 pm

Topics:
Advertising
Drugs
Food
Music

Tags:
KISS
Paul Stanley
coffee


 
In 2000 Paul Stanley taped a commercial for Folgers coffee that never made it to air—it’s been hotly sought after for video scavengers ever since. Audio of the commercial has been on YouTube since 2008, but not the video. Yesterday, a YouTube user named John DiMaggio uploaded it for all to see. It’s a bizarre commercial set in a big top circus tent that doesn’t play to Stanley’s delirious, voluble strengths—in other words, why is Paul Stanley in this commercial and not Paul Williams? No reason that I can see.

The same year that he shot the commercial, Stanley discussed the commercial in an interview: “Life is strange. I got a call asking if I was interested in singing a Folgers commercial. And, like many other things, I thought, ‘Why not?’ I wasn’t at all concerned with who thinks it is okay or not okay, cool, not cool, rock ‘n’ roll or not. I had a blast doing it, and, like I said, isn’t that what this is all about?”

The word (as related by John DiMaggio) is that “focus groups asked ‘who is the old, creepy guy?’ and the agency pulled it.” Seems plausible enough. The soft-focus business with the trapeze artists reminds me of nothing so much as a Cialis commercial.
 

 
via Ultimate Classic Rock/Thank you Annie Zaleski!

Posted by Martin Schneider | Discussion
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