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Lucha libre wrestlers? Nope, just some Chinese women at the beach
01.16.2014
12:52 pm
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Chinese photographer Peng Yangjun snapped these glorious—and slightly terrifying—photographs of Chinese women wearing colorful rubber face masks which protects their fragile, porcelain skin against the sun’s damaging rays.

Yangiun’s slightly twisted series of bathing suit beauties is titled, “Beach.”

I get wanting to protect your skin and all from the sun, but why just the face? Why not an entire rubber gimp suit? I mean, if you’re going to do it, do it right!
 

 

This woman knows what I’m talkin’ about.
 

 
A few more after the jump…
 

READ ON
Posted by Tara McGinley
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01.16.2014
12:52 pm
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Slowmotion Beatboxing looks kind of disgusting
01.16.2014
11:03 am
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I didn’t know what to expect when I hit play for Flula Borg’s “Slow Mo Beatboxing” video, but it certainly wasn’t a Georgia O’Keeffe/David Cronenberg collaboration that spits out farts!

According to Borg, his luscious lips are “like the vagina of a brontosaurus.”

Can we please have a video of Biz Markie slowmotion beatboxing, next? Seriously. 
 

 
Via Laughing Squid

Posted by Tara McGinley
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01.16.2014
11:03 am
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Harvey Pekar’s pal and ‘Genuine Nerd’ Toby Radloff hilariously croons about cocaine
01.12.2014
09:51 am
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Toby Radloff Suit
 
I live right outside of Cleveland, Ohio.  Most of the people in my largely bohemian circle are proud to live and work in the area, and for good reason. It’s a gritty place on a cultural upswing; an amazing, cheap rent, close-knit universe, and a choice locale if you like your world tinged with blue collar, no-bullshit ethics, pierogies, cured meats, bad-ass rock n’ roll and some of realest people on the planet; guys like self-proclaimed “Genuine Nerd,” Toby Radloff.

Toby is perhaps best known for his appearance in the 2003 film American Splendor about Cleveland comic book writer and R. Crumb collaborator, Harvey Pekar. If you’ve seen the film or read the comic book series, you already know that Toby was a friend of Pekar’s and they met in 1980 while working together as file clerks at Cleveland’s VA Hospital. Radloff became a recurring character in Pekar’s American Splendor comic book series for which the film was named.

But the film version of American Splendor was hardly Radloff’s first nerdy experience in front of the camera.

Here’s Pekar on Toby in a 2009 interview:

When he first got on the media, what happened was I had just been on the Letterman show. And MTV sent somebody out to do a story on me at the VA Hospital and I was just taking them around and showing them different things. I introduced them to Toby and after five minutes with him they kicked me to the curb! I can’t compete with that guy!

Radloff was subsequently featured in a handful of vignettes for MTV starting in 1987 and aired, according to Toby, in conjunction with the release of Revenge of the Nerds II.  As an actor, the guy’s a true weirdo, and totally hilarious. He’s appeared in several outsider films, including Killer Nerd and Bride of Killer Nerd made in 1991 and 1992 respectively.  Both are distributed by Troma Films.

Here’s Troma’s synopsis for Killer Nerd:

The Troma Team is proud to present KILLER NERD, a film that stands up for the little guy. It’s every jock’s greatest fear; the nerd you teased in high school is back for REVENGE! Harold Kunkle is that nerd. Teased and taunted by even the paper-girl, he is pushed beyond his meek limits. Harold becomes KILLER NERD! You’ll be in shock when you take witness to KILLER NERD’s bizarre and horrifying ritual of retribution. You’ll be amazed at how a man so dorky could embark on such an orgy of gore. With effects and intensity rivaling that of TAXI DRIVER and Troma’s FATTY DRIVES THE BUS, you’ll be at the edge of your seat… IN FEAR. Starring MTV personality and real-life nerd Toby Radloff, and the stunning Heidi Lohr in her debut performance! This movie is sure to please anyone who has ever been pushed too far. Harold Kunkle is one KILLER NERD who is REALLY out for revenge!

Here you go, make it a double feature:

Killer Nerd
 

 
Bride of Killer Nerd
 

 
In 1999, Toby starred in another low-budget, fringe endeavor called Townies in which he played a necrophylic dumpster-diver, and in 2006, he was the subject of a documentary called, of course, Genuine Nerd.  Both films were created by one of the original producers of the MTV segments, Wayne Alan Harold.

Then, in 2007, Toby appeared with Harvey Pekar on Anthony Bourdain’s No Reservations at Sokolowski’s, a Cleveland staple for oversized culinary delights of the Polish persuasion.  Check it out:
 

 
I’m digressing here, and indeed, Toby’s all over the Internet. But the clip that inspired this whole post in the first place, the one that truly had me laughing my ass off, is from a 1989 Cleveland cable access program called The Eddie Marshall Show.  In it, we find Toby singing a rather goofy number he made up about cocaine to the tune of the “Coke is it!” jingle.  Note that Toby’s quick to point out that he in no way endorses the use of illegal drugs. Also note that the clip starts out with a PSA shout-out from Run DMC! According to Radloff’s own comment on the video, this and other Eddie Marshall Show segments were pitched to MTV but they were rejected. 
 

 
As a side note, my wife Lisa actually worked with Toby years ago in a now defunct Cleveland coffee shop called The Red Star Café.  She says he was one of her favorite coworkers, and absolutely the real deal. I don’t know Toby personally, but his voice is unmistakable, and I’ve seen/heard him and his Nerd Mobile around town on a number of occasions. It makes me smile when I do.

Posted by Jason Schafer
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01.12.2014
09:51 am
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Drop down the Internet K-Hole again with a new round of surreal photos
01.07.2014
12:45 pm
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New year, new series of photos on Internet K-Hole! I live for this site, I tell ya!

If you’re not familiar with the Internet K-Hole phenomenon (I’ve lost hundred of hours on this site, btw), it’s a place where you can smell sour beer and Aqua Net through your computer screen. Sometimes it’s pictures of people that you actually know!

The whole thing’s just inexplicable. It’s uncannily WEIRD. As always, some of the photos are NSFW.
 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Tara McGinley
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01.07.2014
12:45 pm
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‘Holy cosplay, Batman!’ Exact replica of the 1966 mask Adam West wore
01.06.2014
12:56 pm
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Cool as fuck—but bloody expensive at a whopping $1500—replica Batman mask modeled after the one Adam West wore on the 1966 TV show.

It is the only available cowl still being made from the original fabric which has been custom dyed to match a color sample from the dye house used on the show. The pattern was created by a professional pattern maker using a original cowl (from the Hardeman collection) The lightweight fiberglass shell was created using a plaster cast taken from an original as a base. Even the eyebrow paint color has been Pantone matched to the original.

Adam West refers to our Cowl as a “work of art” and is a proud owner of one of our replicas.

It’s available to purchase on Etsy by WilliamsStudio2. According to the write-up, you need to “act now as fabric is in limited supply.”

Via Nerdcore

Posted by Tara McGinley
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01.06.2014
12:56 pm
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It’s 1980’s trash-horror films a go-go with Bleeding Skull!
01.06.2014
11:13 am
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For those of us who grew up during the golden era of VHS, the shelves at the local Mom & Pop video store were the equivalent to visiting some king of gloriously mutated version of Disneyland. The beauty of that era was that because the format being new, all kinds of movies came out of the woodwork. Films like First Blood or E.T. had a great chance of playing in theaters ranging from the metropolitan to box-shaped bergs in the smallest of corn-town America. But what about titles like Psychos in Love, Death Spa or Black Devil Doll From Hell? Forget it, but that was the beauty of VHS is that it truly made the movie going experience more personal and democratic.
 

 
This was never more true than for the horror genre, with the 1980’s being the apex decade for some of the most lurid, grue-filled, nudity-ridden and straight up crazy films in the field. Thanks to the fine folks at Headpress, there is a funhouse ride of a book dedicated to these films. The tome in question? Bleeding Skull: A 1980’s Trash-Horror Odyssey. Originally a website started back in 2004 by Joseph A. Ziemba, who was later joined by Dan Budnik, Bleeding Skull, both as a website and book, is a compendium of all the horror films that more academically minded or overall discerning writers would quickly bolt from. This is, naturally, a highly positive thing!

That fact alone makes Bleeding Skull worth noting, but the added bonus is how entertaining both Ziemba and Budnik are to read. They both have the whole “snark with love” vibe down to a fine art. There are some incredibly funny lines in this book, but they never override the overall reviews. There’s a sensibility to the whole thing of a guy sitting next to you at a bar,  telling you about this weird movie that he just saw that was directed by the guy that made The Giant Spider Invasion and stars Tiny Tim as a sweaty and depressed clown named “The Magnificent Mervo.” (The film in question, by the way, is Blood Harvest. and yes, it exists. Glory.) Who else is going to talk about obscure, made in Wisconsin horror films with Tiny Tim as a clown in them? Not many but that right there captures the essence of Bleeding Skull.
 
Bleeding Skull Book Cover
 
Another impressive thing about this book is that Ziemba and Budnik have truly combed the depths of ultra-obscure horror films for your enjoyment. This was an area of film that before reading this book, I was fairly confident that I knew more than the average bear. Which, while I still do, compared to these guys, I AM the average bear. If it was a no-budget, shot-on-video one day wonder from two guys in Duluth, Minnesota, then dollars to donuts, it is written about in this book!

Headpress continues to cement their already solid reputation as one of the finest purveyors of fringe culture with Bleeding Skull. So crack open your favorite libation, dust off your VCR that’s been gathering dust in your attic and be prepared to read about some of the best, worst, trashiest, sleaziest and gonzo trash-horror films from one of the darkest decades in cinematic history.

Below, for your viewing pleasure (?) Blood Harvest starring Tiny Tim as “Mervo the Clown”:
 

Posted by Heather Drain
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01.06.2014
11:13 am
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Robert Anton Wilson, David Cross talk LSD & Timothy Leary with Bill Maher on ‘Politically Incorrect’
01.02.2014
12:08 pm
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In 1996, Robert Anton Wilson, David Cross, Mama Michelle Phillips and then-SPIN magazine publisher Bob Guccione Jr. appeared on what was intended to be a sort of Timothy Leary-themed discussion on Bill Maher’s Politically Incorrect, and supposed to include Leary himself. As he was so near death at the time, Bob Wilson stepped in to take his place (and did a wonderful job). Everyone on the panel, including Maher, were personal friends with Leary, and offered charming anecdotes about their fading friend.

Unsurprisingly, much of the discussion was about drugs, in particular LSD, which Cross, RAW, Phillps and Maher are all rather strongly in favor of. Guccione Jr., on the other hand, sees drugs in a negative light, and says some stupid stuff about acid until it is pointed out to him that his opinion on LSD is about as worthwhile as the Pope opining on sex.

What is surprising is how timeless this show is. Aside from some Bill Clinton and Bob Dole references in the opening monologue—and Bill Maher’s lapels—it holds up surprisingly well. There’s a particularly good point made by David Cross who explains how it was possible for them to sit there on a TV show and say “We love acid, acid’s great!” without any fear of arrest or reprisal, largely because of Timothy Leary’s fearless advocacy of the psychedelic experience during the 1960s.
 

 
Bonus clip, Bill Maher rants about LSD and psilocybin in 2011:
 

Posted by Richard Metzger
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01.02.2014
12:08 pm
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Super yearoes: ‘Mighty Marvel Calendar’ for 1975 syncs up with 2014
01.02.2014
11:41 am
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Chicago-based cartoonist Mark Anderson has your 2014 calendar covered for this year. Apparently the The Mighty Marvel Calendar for 1975 matches up perfectly with 2014. Anderson lovingly scanned each month and made it available to the public to print or use as desktop wallpaper. Thank you kindly, sir!

Print ‘em while you can!

Below, a few choice selections from the calendar:
 

 

 

 

 

 

 
h/t Laughing Squid

Posted by Tara McGinley
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01.02.2014
11:41 am
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James Bond: The men who auditioned to play 007 in ‘On Her Majesty’s Secret Service’
01.02.2014
11:07 am
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OHMSS2bo.jpg
 
Sean Connery quit the role of James Bond after You Only Live Twice, having “grown tired of the repetitive plots, lack of character development and the general public’s demands on him and his privacy (as well as fearing typecasting).

With a new Bond film, On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, imminent, director Peter Hunt compiled a long list of potential replacements for Sean Connery. This was then reduced to a shortlist of five actors, who were all given screen tests for the role of James Bond in 1967.

The five asked to audition were:

John Richardson, who was then best known for his performance as Tumak in One Million Years B.C.. At the time, he was considered a potential favorite, however, he did not win the part, and went on to star in On A Clear Day I Can See Forever, before having a long career as an actor in Italy.

Anthony Rogers a character actor who appeared on the verge of achieving stardom. However, his career never quite recovered from failing to win the Bond audition.

Robert Campbell an unknown actor/model, who seems to have vanished after his screentest for On Her Majesty’s Secret Service.

Hans De Vries had already appeared in You Only Live Twice, and had a string of roles in TV and films behind him. Unfortunately, it was not enough, and De Vries went on to work with Connery in the western Shalako, and Michael Caine in Ken Russell’s The Billion Dollar Brain, before having a career as a character actor in film and TV.

George Lazenby a former car salesman and successful model (reputedly the highest paid in the world at that time), who best known for appearing in the Big Fry Turkish Delight adverts, had been spotted by Bond producer Cubby Broccoli when getting their hair cut at the same barber. Though he was not an actor, Lazenby impressed at his audition, in particular with his skill at fighting. Lazenby later recalled:

“I had no acting experience, I was coming from the male model point of view. I walked in looking like James Bond, and acting as if that’s the way I was anyway. And they thought, ‘All we have to do is keep this guy just the way he is and we’ll have James Bond.’”

Director Peter Hunt thought Lazenby a natural for the role, and said:

“I aim to make people forget Connery as James Bond once they see Lazenby.”

Alas, this was not to be, for although George Lazenby was one of the best James Bonds, he did not make the audience forget Connery, who had made the role very much his own. However, Lazenby presented a “much more human Bond” with his frailties and inner conflicts.

However, what could have been a highly lucrative and very successful Bond career for Lazenby was soon over, as he announced he would quit the role after the filming of On Her Majesty’s Secret Service. This when Lazenby had already signed-up to film four Bond movies over a seven-year period. As the site MoonrakerBondStation explains, “The big dispute between Lazenby and Bond co-producer Cubby Broccoli was over the rules in Lazenby’s contract.”

He actually could be fired for something as simple as not shaving every day while not even filming a Bond movie. There was even a clause in his contract that stated that he had to get his dinner guests approved by Cubby Broccoli before he could be seen dining out with them in public. There were numerous clauses of this nature in his contract and none of them sat well with Lazenby.

The Bond producers finally realized that they had to let Lazenby out of his contract because he was not going to behave as they wanted him to unless they did so. For example, Lazenby’s wearing a beard and long hair in public, hanging out at nightclubs and bars, and saying he was quitting the role numerous times. This sort of thing was done by Lazenby so that he could get the 7 film deal he wanted, but minus all the Draconian rules it had contained within it. In order to do that he first had to get out of the original contract that he had signed.

You can read about the whole background to the dispute here.

Other actors who had been considered for the role of James Bond include Stanley Baker, Rex Harrison and David Niven, who all lost out to Connery.

Terence Stamp was said to have too many radical ideas; while Michael Caine, did not want to be typecast.

Oliver Reed came very close to winning the role, but his off-screen reputation frightened producers.

Timothy Dalton turned down the role twice before accepting it in 1986.

The unlucky Jon Finch turned down Live and Let Die, and would later lose his role as Kane in Alien after taking ill on set, being replaced by John Hurt.

Lewis Collins, best known as Bodie in the TV series The Professionals was considered to be too aggressive.

James Brolin was set to play Bond, before Moore agreed to return in Octopussy.

There was also Richard Burton, Cary Grant, James Mason, Patrick McGoohan, Rod Taylor, Clint Eastwood, Burt Reynolds, Adam West, Liam Neeson, Hugh Jackman and Ewan McGregor, who all turned the role down. A full list can be found here.
 
bondcollct.jpg
Composite photograph of the actors who auditioned to play James Bond in ‘On Her Majesty’s Secret Service’
 
For your eyes only, more pix of the other potential Bonds, after the jump…

READ ON
Posted by Paul Gallagher
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01.02.2014
11:07 am
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‘The time I met Dean Martin…’ A True Story
01.01.2014
11:17 am
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There is a humorous recipe for “Martin Burgers” that Dean Martin came up with (grill some ground beef, pour a shot of bourbon, done!) that was posted by Letters of Note that reminded me of my own encounter with the legendary entertainer. It also involves hamburgers. And bourbon. It’s one of my favorite stories to tell. Gather ‘round, children…

This event took place in, I think, 1992, when I was 26 years old. I’d recently read Nick Tosches’ excellent biography of Martin, Dino: Living High in the Dirty Business of Dreams, and I was on a Dean Martin “kick” that culminated in me having a professional photo house make me a 6 ft. by 6 ft. photo mural of the above Dean Martin album cover (which Boing Boing’s Mark Fraunenfelder once described in Wired. I still have it, but it’s not hanging up).

I was absolutely fascinated by Dean Martin, the very definition of the devil-may-care roué who truly wasn’t impressed by anything or anyone. Beauty? He had more women than he knew what to do with. Fame? Come on. Money? Please! Dino didn’t care if you were the President of the United States, some hot piece of ass or the head of the Las Vegas Mafia. The man, to paraphrase the Super Furry Animals, simply did not give a fuck. Weltschmerz as an art form! Ennui deluxe! I reckon Dean Martin must’ve been the coolest man ever to live.

Janet Charlton, the Star magazine gossip columnist, seen frequently on Access Hollywood,  ET and similar shows back then, told me that Dean Martin—who was generally thought to be a complete recluse, sitting home drunk in an armchair watching movie westerns, basically—did in fact dine out nearly every night at the Hamburger Hamlet (an upscale LA burger chain) on Doheny Drive in Beverly Hills.

A few weeks after she told me this, Mike and Roni, two pals of mine from New York, arrived on my doorstep unannounced. They seemed quite amused by my gigantic Dean Martin album cover and when I told them that he was a regular at the Doheny Drive Hamburger Hamlet, we all three enthusiastically agreed that this was where we’d dine that evening. And we brought a camera.

I generally like the Hamburger Hamlet chain, but the one in Beverly Hills has got to be THE restaurant in LA with the oldest clientele, hands down. It’s the sort of place where grandparents take their grandchildren out to eat and the grandchildren are in their seventies. I’m talking OLD. Palm Springs old. Miami Beach old. A few of the faces seemed extremely familiar from sixties television, character actors who might have been on The Beverly Hillbillies, Bonanza or Green Acres, but who I could not place exactly due to the passing of years. What made walking into this place seem even more surreal is that it is merely a block away from all the rock clubs on the Sunset Strip.

So we get there and valet the car. I asked the maître d’, who must’ve been all of 19, if we could be seated near Dean Martin’s table. He took the money I put into his hand and looked at me like I was an idiot. Not a stalker mind you, but a complete idiot. “Oookay,” he whistled dismissively and rolled his eyes.

Martin was not there, he told us, but they did expect him. So we sat in the lobby and we waited. And waited. And waited. After looking at the grub the waiters were serving up, we decided he wasn’t going to show up and split to grab a steak at Dan Tana’s. As the valet handed me my car keys I asked him, “We heard that Dean Martin eats here all the time. When is a good day to see him?” He replied “Mr Martin? Oh, his chauffeur just phoned ahead, he’ll be here any minute.”

I tossed my keys back to him and we returned inside and were seated in the back section of the restaurant. Within a few minutes, the sultan of suave, secret agent Matt Helm, the roast-master general hisself, Dean Martin stumbled in, completely shit-faced. His eyes were bloodshot red and he looked old and he looked drunk. Very drunk. It was probably a very good thing that he could afford to employ a full-time driver, let’s just say…

As soon as he took his seat, the waiter slammed down several shots of bourbon and two beers in front of him. Dino downed two shots immediately and two more were placed in front of him in a flash.

We made our move before they brought his food out. Roni got her camera ready and asked politely, “Mr. Martin, can I get a picture of you with these guys? They’re big fans of yours!”

He looked at us like “Yeah, right” and replied quietly “Most of my fans these days are old broads.”

I told him about my giant 6 ft. mural of his album cover and that I was born and raised in Wheeling, WV, just across the Ohio River from Martin’s hometown of Steubenville, OH. He softened a bit and said “I remember Wheeling, WV. I used to swim there and mess around and hang out there when I was a boy.” (No matter how slowly I ask you to imagine this sentence being said, you’re going to make it faster in your mind than he spoke it. Pause after each word as if there is a period… or a wheeze).

Today Steubenville has dozens of things named after Dean Martin (they also hold a yearly Dean Martin festival). I asked him when was the last time he’d visited his hometown and he just snickered.

“Do you mind if we get a picture?” Roni asked again.

“I don’t think they allow that here,” he demurred, trying to avoid it.

“Who’s gonna stop us? Let’s just do it,” she replied.

Martin shook his head and exhaled with undisguised annoyance, parted his lips and clicked on a a very fake smile. Through his gritted teeth he said “Go ahead, I don’t give a shit.” Something about his manner let Mike and I know that he meant NOW, so we squatted beside his chair.

After the flash went off, his smile vanished, he looked down at his drink and completely ignored us. We knew this was our cue to leave and we took it. Outside his limo was waiting. It sported a vanity plate reading “DRUNKY.”

The story doesn’t end there: Two weeks later I get a package of two big prints of the photo and several smaller ones from Roni. I laughed my ass off, DELIGHTED at seeing this memento of our loopy encounter with Dino. I left them out on the kitchen counter and every time I walked past them I grinned and marveled at the fact that a photo existed with Dean Martin and ME in it.

Then the phone rang. It was Roni asking had I gotten the package. I was looking down at the picture when she asked me: “Did you notice that his…”

No, I hadn’t noticed it, but I did then: His pants had been unfastened and un-zipped old man-style so his gut could hang out and the camera had caught this!

The photo I had been admiring all day became a million times better before my very eyes.

But the story doesn’t end there, either: At the time, I was in the middle of writing a script with Kramer (he of Bongwater and Shimmy-Disc fame) and I gave him one of the larger prints, which he hung in his Noise New Jersey studio. Around this time, he and Penn Jillette had formed a band called Captain Howdy and they were doing a bit of recording. Apparently Penn asked Kramer who the old guy in the photo was, but he refused to believe it when told that it was Dean Martin. Eventually he relented, and the Captain Howdy song “Dino’s Head” was apparently inspired in part by the below photo (and Penn getting to use Dean Martin’s “special” German shower head when Penn & Teller were performing in Las Vegas, as is explained in the song).
 

Click on photo to view larger image.
 

 

It doesn’t end there, either. Last month, HBO’s Real Time with Bill Maher used the Dino photo in a bit comparing JFK to Reagan, as seen below

 

Posted by Richard Metzger
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01.01.2014
11:17 am
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