follow us in feedly
American Gothic version of Divine and John Waters
06.11.2015
11:46 am

Topics:
Amusing
Art
Heroes
Kooks
Pop Culture

Tags:


 
There’s really not much to say about this fantastic painting of Divine and John Waters taking the place of the old prairie couple in Grant Wood’s iconic 1930 painting “American Gothic.” I simply dig it.

I had a hard time tracking down the artist as I misread the signature as GG Allin. To be honest for a few moments there I actually thought the late shit-hurling hate rocker painted this. The artisit’s name is spelled GIGI ALLIN and here are links to her Instagram and website.


The work in progress via Instagram
 
Via Divine on Facebook

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
People who have tattoos of Steve Buscemi. Because Steve Buscemi
06.11.2015
10:21 am

Topics:
Amusing
Art

Tags:


 
Don’t even ask how got lost looking at tattoos of Steve Buscemi. But I did. And here’s the proof: A collection of the good, the bad and just some downright craptastic tattoos of the apparently widely beloved character actor.

BTW, I was simply astonished at the amount of Steve Buscemi tattoos that are out there. He has some seriously diehard fans. I didn’t post all the tattoos I found because I could have spent all day doing that. Feel free to add your own Steve Buscemi tattoos in the comments.


 

 

 

 

 
More after the jump…
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
The Devil and his Servants: Demonic illustrations from 18th century occult book
06.11.2015
07:21 am

Topics:
Art
Books
Occult

Tags:

0001devileatsxcvhj901.jpg
 
I had a friend who liked to collect occult illustrations from the earliest woodcuts of witches sabbats to hand-painted plates of winged demons. My friend did not see these pictures as telling a history of the occult, but rather a luminous narrative of the imagination’s power to invent monsters.

Similarly fabulous creatures can be found in the illustrations to the Compendium rarissimum totius Artis Magicae sistematisatae per celeberrimos Artis hujus Magistros, a rare book on the occult dating from 1775 which is held by the Wellcome Library. The volume is written in a mixture of German and Latin and contains 31 water-color illustrations of the Devil and his demonic servants together with three pages of magic and occult ritualistic symbols.

With the warning “NOLI ME TANGERE” (“Do Not Touch”) on its cover, the compendium can be seen as a last attempt by those of faith to instil fear among the superstitious. After all, the Compendium Artis Magicae was produced during the decade of revolutions (American and French) and in the Age of Enlightenment—when reason, science and the power of the individual dominated, and the first stirrings of industry were about to change Europe and the world. The horrendous witch trials of the 16th and 17th centuries were long banished and the last execution in England for witchcraft took place in 1716 (1727 in Scotland, 1750 in Austria, 1782 in Switzerland), while the practise of witchcraft ceased to be a criminal offense across Europe during the century (England 1735)—all of which makes this Compendium Artis Magicae all the more bizarre.

The illustrations are a mix of Greco-Roman mythical monsters (chimeras such as Cerberus and Hydra), Phoenician gods (Astarte/Astaroth) biblical devils (Beelzebub, Satan), while some look as though they were inspired by witnessing the slaughter of men and beasts on European battlefields.

The claim that the book originated in 1075 has been dismissed, and the whole volume has been scanned on Hi-Res and can be viewed in detail at the Wellcome Library.
 
07demonxtyghvb07.jpg
 
004withchxiyuhvby04.jpg
 
00666wizardhgghghih06.jpg
 
More nightmarish demons, after the jump…

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Fascinating photographs of an abandoned Chinese fishing village reclaimed by nature
06.10.2015
10:35 am

Topics:
Art
Environment

Tags:


 
Nanning-based photographer Tang Yuhong takes us on a lovely photographic journey through an abandoned fishing village in China. We see Mother Nature claiming back what was once rightfully hers.

The village is located in the Shengsi Islands, near the mouth of the Yangtze River. What I wouldn’t give to take a boat trip on the Yangtze to visit these small islands. If these amazing photos are anything to go by, I wonder what other treasures the islands hold?


 

 

 
More after the jump…
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Idiot Box: Vacant stares of children watching TV are a terrible advertisement for TV
06.10.2015
08:52 am

Topics:
Art
Television

Tags:


 
Not for nothing has been TV been called an “electronic babysitter.” The calm and soothing cathode ray tube (and its successors) has a powerful capacity to induce a state of quiescence in all but the most unruly of children, which is one reason overtaxed parents are often grateful for its effects.

Children in America watch in excess of 24 hours of television per week, which I assume to mean 24 hours of television programming, regardless of the device used to watch it. That doesn’t include the time spent playing video games or surfing the web. It’s a lot of time. Brooklyn-based photographer Donna Stevens recently put together an intriguing and disturbing series of photographs under the heading “Idiot Box” in order to get us to think about televsion’s most eager and impressionable audience: children.

Every shot is taken in a dark room lit only by the glow of the television screen. The camera is positioned near enough to the television set that we can regard it as a TV-POV shot. The portraits emphasize the children’s vacant eyes and unexpressive facial expressions. It’s enough to make you want to research television addiction and its effects.

I’d like to see the same series done with adults!
 

 

 

 
More after the jump…

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
The strange and lovely Surrealism of ‘Harper’s Bazaar’ in the ‘30s
06.10.2015
06:22 am

Topics:
Art
Design

Tags:


 
This is the second installation of posts from the influential graphic artist Art Chantry’s forthcoming book Art Chantry Speaks: A Heretic’s History of 20th Century Graphic Design. The first is here. Chantry’s clear reverence for and deep knowledge of the history of his discipline, particularly in championing its seediest manifestations and its obsolete processes, informs a body of work which as much as anyone’s has been THE look of garage punk and grunge, and we’re grateful to Chantry and Feral House for letting us use his work in this form.—Ron Kretsch

Above is the cover of Harper’s Bazaar, September 15th, 1939. The cover is by A.M. Cassandre (1901-1968). I was lucky enough to stumble across a stash of these in a thrift store. I have the entire year bracketing from December 1938 all the way through January 1940. With the exception of three covers, they were all designed and illustrated by A.M. Cassandre.

Cassandre is considered maybe the high point of “high” Art Deco graphic design. His most famous poster is of a luxury liner barreling down on you, imaged from the bow of the ship. It’s a stunner. Virtually all of his posters—and he did many—are perfect. Each one is a highly prized collector’s item, a high mark in the history of poster design and graphic design. At his peak, the guy could do no wrong.
 

 
This is not to confuse A.M. Cassandre’s work with Art Deco exclusively. I doubt he considered his work “Art Deco” at all. He was one of a huge number—a legion—of graphic designers simply working in the hip style of the moment. Cassandre was not working in a vacuum; there were hundreds of competitors making similarly stunning posters while he was at work. Cassandre’s output was just a hair more astonishing, just a little “better” than the pack. Now, he’s virtually the only guy whose name we recognize from that era of poster design.

One of the big differences was that Cassandre was a Surrealist. The late 1930s was a period when Surrealism invaded American advertising. Surrealism leaked over from Europe initially through the art scene. But the real transfer of surreal dream imagery didn’t really cross the Atlantic until it hitchhiked on the back of the fashion industry. Euro-trash fashionistas of the ‘30s were avid hipsters, too. So they aped their ideas in a shallow copycat way into their fashionista thinking.

The ads in these magazines are a mind-blowing trip. Instead of real models, there was a proliferation of mannequins. And if that wasn’t disturbing enough, they are set in graphic dreamscapes, often with disturbing defacing elements like vegetables for heads and bananas for hands floating in swirling clouds and watch faces. All very cool, très chic!

Cassandre’s illustration style was part Dali, part Magritte and a little Max Ernst tossed in for shits and giggles. Cassandre’s imagery was so strange that his work looks psychedelic today (the chemical Surrealism of a later time). For an American magazine of this era, his work must have stood out like a big strange thumb.
 

 
Cassandre’s cover work for this period of Harper’s Bazaar was strange, to say the least. Instead of depicting actual fashions, he depicted the fantasy behind the fashion. He concentrated on the “dream of the idea” of what was being said and what the implication may be. It appealed to an emotional level of otherness and spin. The world on the verge of the second world war must have seemed like a bad nightmare unfolding. So Cassandre depicted floating eyeballs over an outline of France to imagine Paris fashion on the brink of catastrophe. Disturbing stuff—especially weird to see on the cover of a fashion magazine.

More after the jump…

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Leave a comment
Banksy gets Banksied
06.09.2015
01:18 pm

Topics:
Art
Books

Tags:


 
You might not know the name Butcher Billy, but if you love and appreciate (as I do) the “Post/Punk New Wave Superfriends” or the “Real life villains in the Legion of Doom,” then you already know the Brazilian artist’s subversively daffy, pop sensibility.

Billy’s latest intervention takes on the most inspired street artist of them all—BANKSY. What Butcher Billy did was to take a bunch of the most iconic Banksy graffiti designs out there and replace the principals with animated characters from the worlds of Disney, Warner Bros., and Hanna Barbera.  So the maid in “Maid in London” gets replaced with Rosie from The Jetsons, while the girl in “Girl With a Balloon” gets the Donald Duck treatment. You get the idea.

Butcher Billy has slapped together a bunch of the designs, which are available as a coloring book that you can order from Behance.
 

 

 

 
More after the jump…

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
DIY sex toys. One of ‘em involves a turntable.
06.09.2015
11:38 am

Topics:
Art
Music
Sex

Tags:


 
Dutch band De Jeugd van Tegenwoordig (which means to “Kids These Days” or “The Youth of Nowadays”) released a music video a few years back for their song “Elektrotechnique” which only features DIY sex toys. I’m not going to lie, I don’t understand a few of these homemade “sexual pleasure enhancers.” Okay, let me correct myself, I understand how they work, I guess I just don’t get how some of these would feel good or be pleasurable? I’m going to assume the majority of these are just freaky art installations. Who knows.

But hey, if they get your rocks off… then go for it. I don’t want to be all judgmental about something certain folks might dig.

 
via WFMU on Twitter

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
‘The Black Power Tarot’: Beautifully illustrated tarot deck with Sun Ra, Richard Pryor and more!
06.09.2015
10:27 am

Topics:
Art
Belief
Design

Tags:


 
With the seal of approval from tarot maestro Alejandro Jodorowsky, comes these beautifully illustrated tarot cards by artist Michael Eaton and arranged and edited by King Khan. “The Black Power Tarot” is a version of the Tarot De Marseilles featuring black activists, public figures, comedians, musicians and important historic figures.

The cards are quite lovely if you ask me. If you look closely you’ll see Malcolm X, James Brown, Chuck Berry, Howlin’ Wolf, Sister Rosetta Tharpe and more.

There are 21 high quality prints that come in their own box. The set is £25.00 GBP (or around $39 USD).


 

 
More after the jump…
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Wild prism stickers of 80s horror movies
06.08.2015
08:33 am

Topics:
Art
Movies

Tags:


Day of the Dead
 
These prismatic stickers, universally referred to as “prism stickers,” were all the rage in the late 1980s, which happily coincided with a classic period for horror movies, when the Halloween, Friday the 13th, Hellraiser, Nightmare on Elm Street franchises were churning out product at an alarming clip.

Yesterday on his delightful Tumblr John Darnielle of the Mountain Goats posted a pic of one of these, the Day of the Dead image above, with this message:
 

you put a quarter into the vending machine and you get a sticker that reflects the light all rainbow-like and it says “the darkest day of horror the world has ever known” on it

there’s a lot wrong with this world but then again check out this completely rad sticker, is what I’m saying

 
Hear, hear! I can’t get enough of the colors on these—the Slaughter High one in particular strikes me as a minor masterpiece. Darnielle and I aren’t alone in our admiration, in trying to find images of these stickers (not the easiest thing in the world), it was noticeable that many of these went for prices upwards of $30 on eBay.
 

They Live
 

An American Werewolf in London
 

Slaughter High
 

Beetlejuice
 
More prism stickers after the jump…

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Page 2 of 247  < 1 2 3 4 >  Last ›