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‘Shocked’ Trump face, Nicolas Cage, luchador and many more WEIRD one-piece swimsuits
06.21.2017
08:15 am
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Donald Trump
 
Today is the first day of summer—even if every day tends to feel like summer anymore—so it seems appropriate to blog about these interesting one-piece bathing suits for women. Beloved Wear makes these suits and and believe it or not… they’re on sale! Each one will cost you just $49.95!

I can’t vouch for the quality as I’ve never shopped from this website before, but you’re probably 100% sure to turn a lot of heads if you sport one by the pool or at the beach. I can pretty much guarantee it.


Nicolas Cage
 

Luchador
 
More after the jump…

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Posted by Tara McGinley
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06.21.2017
08:15 am
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Dream of Venus: Inside Salvador Dalí‘s spectacular & perverse Surrealist funhouse from 1939
06.20.2017
10:44 am
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The fabled entrance to the “Dream of Venus” pavilion created by Salvador Dalí for the World’s Fair in 1939.
 
Salvador Dalí was asked to create a pavilion for the World’s Fair to be held in Summer of 1939 in Flushing Meadow, Queens, NY. Given a canvas this big, as you might imagine, Dalí‘s concept for what was called “Dream of Venus” was just as over-the-top as the wildly eccentric Surrealist himself. In a letter written to his friend, Spanish filmmaker Luis Buñuel, Dalí reported that the pavilion would include “genuine explosive giraffes.” That never happened during the eight weeks it took to set up and construct what has been referred to as Dalí‘s “funhouse.”

The creation of the pavilion was the idea of noted architect, artist, and art collector, Ian Woodner. Woodner approached New York art dealer Julien Levy and together they quickly decided to give the gig to Dalí. As you entered the pavilion you had to pass between twin pillars that were fashioned in the image of female legs that were protruding from a skirt that had been pulled up above the knees. In various windows at the entrance, Dali placed a sculpture of a nude torso of a woman with another naked body of a woman in a window above who had a mermaid-like tail. There was also a large-scale image of Botticelli’s “Birth of Venus.” Dalí had intended to remove the head of the goddess and replace it with a fish head. This was one of many conceptual ideas the artist had intended to incorporate into the pavilion that was soundly rejected by the Fair’s organizers and sponsors. Dalí was so incensed by the Fair’s requests for alterations to his fever-dream funhouse that he wrote a pamphlet called “Declaration of the Independence of the Imagination and the Rights of Man to His Own Madness.” The pamphlet condemned the Fair’s censorship of his work and with the help of a pilot and an airplane, he had copies of it dropped from the sky all over New York City.

Here’s a bit from Dalí‘s “fuck you squares” manifesto which you can read in its entirety here:

“Only the violence and duration of your hardened dream can resist the hideous mechanical civilization that is your enemy, that is also the enemy of the ‘..pleasure-principle’ of all men. It is man’s right to love women with the ecstatic heads of fish.”

 
Once visitors got inside “Dream of Venus” things got fantastically freaky. Two huge swimming pools featured partially nude models floating around in the water. In one of the pools, a woman dressed in a head-to-toe rubber suit that had been painted with piano keys cavorted around with other “mermaids” who “played” her imaginary piano. In fact, the place was filled with scantly-clad women lying in beds or perched on top of a taxi being driven by a female looking S&M batwoman. There were functional telephones made of rubber as well as an offputting life-size version of a cow’s udder that you could touch—if you wanted to, that is. Dalí had originally intended for all of his female models (his “living liquid ladies”) to have fish heads, but this was yet another one of the artist’s visions for the pavilion that was spit on by Fair’s sponsors. What a drag. Despite all the push back, “Dream of Venus” is nothing short of a stunning display of touristy fun gone off the rails. I’ve posted images of the funhouse-style pavilion below, many of which were taken by German-born photographer Eric Schaal. The 2002 book, Salvador Dalí‘s Dream of Venus: The Surrealist Funhouse from the 1939 World’s Fair chronicled the entire process down to the very last detail in photos including behind-the-scenes snapshots of some of Dalí‘s models getting ready to give the performance of their lives. Most of the images that follow are NSFW.
 

Dalí and his wife and muse, Gala.
 

 
More Dalinian madness at the 1939 World Fair, after the jump…

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Posted by Cherrybomb
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06.20.2017
10:44 am
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‘K’ is for ‘kilogram’: Pictures from a grim, reality-based ABC book for adults
06.16.2017
10:38 am
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A page from illustrator Toby Leigh’s upcoming book ‘ABC For Adults.’
 
The work of oddball London-based illustrator Toby Leigh was in part inspired by his discovery of the deviant stylings of comic book hero Robert Crumb whom Leigh became aware of at a very young age. I’ve always been a huge supporter of starting kids young when it comes to the good stuff in life like hipping them to the finer things—and the art of Mr. Crumb should always be considered “good stuff.” For instance, my Dad turned me on to Ralph Steadman when I was a kid and whenever I get to write about Steadman or his larger-than-life muse Hunter S. Thompson, I thank my Dad. For the soon-to-be-published book, ABC For Adults Leigh revisited his own childhood after finding an ABC book that he once owned as a kid in an antique shop in Wiltshire.

Leigh’s illustrations and use of soft, appealing color schemes borrow from the vintage pages of Little Golden Books. In a rather brilliant and nefarious move, instead of substituting blatant adult-oriented words (you know like “F is for fuck” or “V is for Vagina”), Leigh used mostly toddler-level words in the book accompanied by corresponding illustrations. Like an image of a balding, white-haired man clutching his chest for the letter “H” and it’s alphabet word “heart.” According to Leigh, when he presented his finished work to potential publishers, two of them requested that he tone down a few of his illustrations. Leigh heroically refused and is currently using the crowdfunded publishing tool Unbound to raise the funds to put the book out, which should be seeing the light of day sometime in July in the UK and shortly thereafter in the U.S. For a pledge of $20 bucks (plus shipping) you can get your very own hardbound copy, with your name on the back cover which seems like the makings of a very cool family heirloom to me. I’ve posted some images of Leigh’s hardcore ABC’s below, a few of which are slightly NSFW.
 

One of the illustrations from Leigh’s book that potential publishers urged him to tone down.
 

 

 
More after the jump…

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Posted by Cherrybomb
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06.16.2017
10:38 am
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This isn’t Happiness: The heartbreak, depression and empty sex of Modern Love
06.16.2017
09:49 am
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Peter Nidzgorski is the artist provocateur behind the site This isn’t Happiness™. Under the name Peteski, he blogs about art, photographs, design, and disappointment. All of which has made This isn’t Happiness™ “One of the ‘Top 100 Overall’ Ranked Blogs on the Internet” according to Technorati.

One of the big attractions of Nidzgorski’s site is his clever manipulation of images like these altered panels from classic love story comic books. Nidzgorski asks his followers to suggest sentences or quotes which he then adds to a specific panel. His theme is modern love. Or rather a satirical take on the shallow, fickle, empty sex, selfie-obsessed and self-destructive nature of modern love, which is probably something most people can relate to.

See more of Peteski’s work on Instagram.
 
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Many more brokenhearts and disappointed lovers, after the jump…

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Posted by Paul Gallagher
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06.16.2017
09:49 am
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‘I’m Always Thinking of You’: The Bruce Conner occult greeting card
06.16.2017
08:34 am
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‘I’m Always Thinking of You,’ greeting card by Bruce Conner, c. 1957 (via Dust-to-Digital)
 
Dust-to-Digital, the excellent reissue label behind last year’s Music of Morocco: Recorded by Paul Bowles, 1959, has reprinted this greeting card drawn by Bruce Conner some 60 years ago. It costs $5.

Like Harry Smith, Conner was employed by a bohemian greeting card company called Inkweed Studios (later The Haunted Inkbottle) during the ‘50s. Lionel and Joanne Ziprin—he a poet and Kabbalist, she a dancer, illustrator, and model—were its founders. The notes from Glenn Horowitz Bookseller’s 2011 exhibition of material from the Inkweed archives are full of fascinating details about the Ziprins, the artists they worked with, and the businesses they ran. While they do not seem to have made much of a dent in Hallmark’s monopoly, they gave Bruce Conner and other artists the greatest gift of all: cash.

Inkweed offered itself as a launching pad for a handful of equally ambitious and talented artists, several of whom found their first paying commercial jobs with the company. These include polymath artists Harry Smith and Jordan Belson, painter and filmmaker Bruce Conner, and illustrators Barbara Remington and William Mohr. Smith’s instantly recognizable geometric designs were used for a series of hand screened Christmas cards, which echoed the artist’s famed series of drawings and collotypes inspired by Kabbalistic themes. Their most prodigious collaborator, however, was Conner, who met the Ziprins on a visit to New York in 1951. While studying art at Wichita University and the University of Nebraska, Conner regularly sent The Ziprins card concepts, alongside completed linoleum cuts and meticulous printing instructions. Conner’s work for the Ziprins—inspired by the two-dimensional, alien forms of painter Paul Klee and the absurdum ad infinitum ethos of Dada and Beat—infused Inkweed with a heavy dose of subversive wit and black humor. Conner’s vision inspired the Ziprins to take greater risk in their own designs, expanding the parameters of what the company could and would soon become.

After the jump. Conner’s video for “Mea Culpa” from Brian Eno and David Byrne’s ‘My Life in the Bush of Ghosts’...

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Posted by Oliver Hall
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06.16.2017
08:34 am
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Someone made an IRL SpongeBob and Patrick
06.15.2017
11:12 am
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It took a little digging around to figure out who made these “real life” versions of SpongeBob SquarePants and Patrick Star. They’re scary has hell to look at. To feel the full-effect, click on the images to enlarge ‘em to see what I’m talking about.

The artist who made these 3D characters is named Miguel Vasquez and you can visit his site here to see more. If you dare… , that is.


 

 

 
via Ronny

Posted by Tara McGinley
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06.15.2017
11:12 am
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Video of old man headbanging like hell to Metallica in his car
06.15.2017
09:50 am
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I’m not a big fan of Metallica, but this guy sure is! This video gave me a case of the giggles and made me happy. It’s my “feel-good video of the day,” as Geekologie puts it. Here’s an unsuspecting older gentleman sitting in traffic headbanging to Metallica’s “For Whom the Bell Tolls.” At least I think that’s the song.

The only problem with this video is it should have been longer. I could have watched this for a long, long time with a big ol’ grin on my face. 

 

Posted by Tara McGinley
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06.15.2017
09:50 am
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‘The Nuclear War Fun Book’: Morbid laffs from the end of the world
06.14.2017
12:26 pm
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The prospect of catastrophic nuclear war has an interesting effect on the human psyche. My dad used to work for a man named Herman Kahn, who became famous in the early 1960s for writing a book called Thinking About the Unthinkable, which sought to analyze outcomes in which some portion of humanity survived the conflict more or less normally. Kahn’s reward for this was being savagely caricatured in the form of the Groeteschele character played by Walter Matthau in Sidney Lumet’s 1964 drama Fail-Safe. (Just a few months earlier, Kahn, along with Wernher von Braun, John von Neumann, and Edward Teller, became one of the quartet of people that went into the creation of Peter Sellers’ delirious eponym in Stanely Kubrick’s Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb.)

The Reagan years were an interesting time to be terrified of a war between the Russians and the Americans. For whatever reason the year 1983 was the, er, “ground zero” for the trope in pop culture. You had the absolute non plus ultra of “event TV” in ABC’s televised movie The Day After, which on November 20, 1983, imagined a nuclear warhead taking out Lawrence, Kansas. The same year saw the release of the grim Jane Alexander movie Testament and the sprightly hacker fantasy WarGames, both of which drew narrative oomph from the prospect of mushroom clouds over America. And of course the Wolverines of Red Dawn would beat the Russians guerrilla style a year later.

In 1982, however, a delicious and peculiar bit of black comedy hit the bookshelves, a parody of a children’s activity book that was executed almost too well—squint, and you just might mistake it for an earnest and actual fun book for the Armageddon to come. Which might be a backhanded way of saying the book isn’t really all that funny. But it sure is interesting.

The book was written by Victor Langer and Walter Thomas. You have to give them credit, they really nailed the tone they were going after, from the earnest assurance that some “prewar” activities have been included so that kids don’t have to wait until nuclear disaster strikes to begin having fun, to the bleak and vivid prospect of a “paper doll nuclear wardrobe,” which enables you to dress up mom and dad in a bodybag.

I don’t know much about the two authors, except that parodies such as this was Langer’s stock in trade for a while there—other titles included The IRS Coloring Book, Surviving Your Baby and Child, and a parody of The Whole Earth Catalog under the title The Whole Whog Catalog that somehow featured an introduction by none other than Chevy Chase.

Now that we’re annoyed at the Russians again, this book weirdly seems very much of our own time somehow, which might account for the startling prices the book is fetching on Amazon.
 

 

 
More from this remarkable little book after the jump…...
 

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Posted by Martin Schneider
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06.14.2017
12:26 pm
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Average Joes, not Fabios: Regular people recreate cheesy romance novel covers (and it’s perfect!)
06.13.2017
10:56 am
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The longing gazes and lusty embraces. The bodices bursting with boobies. And Fabio. Lots and lots of Fabio. Such are the elements of your standard issue romance novel cover.

Photographer and photo editor Kathleen Kamphausen recreated those cheesy romance novels often see in grocery stores, with some regular-looking people. There’s not a single Fabio in the bunch! 

It looks like everyone involved in the photoshoot had a blast. The results are pretty damned funny.


 

 
More after the jump…

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Posted by Tara McGinley
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06.13.2017
10:56 am
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Home for sale in Arizona is move-in ready IF YOU’RE A CRAZY CAT PERSON
06.13.2017
09:23 am
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These may not be particularly original observations, but two things are true of cats—they find more of interest in our houses than we do, and they’d be happier still living in labyrinths of cat-sized Habitrail tubes. But what if there was a middle option—what if you needed a human house decked out entirely for the comfort and enjoyment of cats?

If you’re OK with living on the outskirts of Nowheresville By God Arizona, you’re covered.

A property for sale at 669 Stanford Drive (Country Road 8235) in unincorporated Concho, AZ, is convenient to expanses of hot dirt and little else. But you’re not moving here to be right in the mix, you’re here for your furbabies (and if you unironically call your pets that I’m not 100% sure we can be friends). Every room in the place is essentially Pee-wee’s Playhouse for cats. I’m powerless to further describe the 2,500 sqft of eyebleedy cat toy that is this house, I can only let the realtor’s photos do the talking.

See the effects of untreated toxoplasmosis on the human mind, after the jump…

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Posted by Ron Kretsch
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06.13.2017
09:23 am
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