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Trading cards of some dangerous minds, deep thinkers & radical intellectuals

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For those with an interest in big ideas, these trading cards from Theory.org should fire up your neurotransmitters.

Between 2000-2001, a set of twelve trading cards was released monthly via David Gauntlett’s website Theory.org. This original set of cards featured theorists (and their concepts) from the world of social and cultural theory, gender and identity, and media studies. The first out of the pack was British social theorist Anthony Giddens who devised the theory of structuration and wrote the book on The Third Way. This was followed by theorist Judith Butler whose book Gender Trouble argued that “biological” sexes were just as much as a social construct as gender. Then came the great controversial French thinker Michel Foucault with his ideas about sexuality, gender and power structures. The deck included some interesting choices like artists Tracey Emin, Gilbert & George and concepts like Postmodernity and Psychoanalysis.

This official set of twelve trading cards was thought by some to lack a few key players and its release inspired various academics, students and alike to produce their own cards. These additions included Karl Marx, Carl Jung, Simone de Beauvoir, Edward Said, Germaine Greer, Walter Benjamin and Marcel Duchamp.

Described as “Creative knowledge you can put your pocket™” these cards can be used to play a game of trumps—in which players can match strengths, weaknesses and special skills. For example, Foucault’s special skill of happily rejecting old models and creating new ones, might not quite beat Duchamp’s ability to confuse the hell out of everyone.

The full set is below—but if you want to own a set of these super brainy trading cards (and who wouldn’t?) then deal yourself in by clicking here.
 
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#1 Anthony Giddens—British social theorist.
 
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#2 Judith Butler—American philosopher and gender theorist.
 
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#3 Michel Foucault—French philosopher, theorist, philologist and literary critic.
 
More thinkers and some big ideas, after the jump…

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Monster Magic Action trading cards from the 1960s are crude, colorful masterpieces
09.27.2016
02:47 pm

Topics:
Art
Media

Tags:
monsters
trading cards


 
“The Magic Lens is the secret of its action!” With this sentence the Abby Finishing Corp. lured kids to purchase its amazing set of 24 lenticular monster trading cards in around 1963. For the most part, we think of the pop culture artifacts from that time as being pretty cheesy, but these cards are anything but, incorporating a bold use of color and crude, arresting compositions. I’d love to see one of these take up a full wall in my house!

The lens seems really simple, just a plastic rectangle really. The instructions were simple: “Place the magic Lens ROUGH SIDE UP on picture, and wiggle both together; or place Magic Lens ROUGH SIDE UP on picture, and slide Lens only.”

As the 3D Review online magazine asserted about these cards, “When using the Magic Action viewer, the cards would come to life showing a flying monster’s wings flapping or the tail of a giant lizard whipping up and down or people fleeing.”

You can buy a complete set for $95 on Amazon.
 

 

 
Much more after the jump…...

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Damn fine teeny-tiny ‘Twin Peaks’ dioramas


A diorama based on Agent Dale Cooper’s dream about the ‘Red-Room’ from David Lynch’s 1990 television series ‘Twin Peaks.’
 
An artist based in Babenhausen, Germany named “Kristina” is currently selling her super-small DIY Twin Peaks diorama sets that come in three different versions based on scenes from the original television series that made its debut over 25 years ago.
 

A tiny David Lynch is included with this version of ‘Red-Room’ diorama.
 
Available in her Etsy store Boxartig you can pick up what Kristina refers to as “Dodos” of Agent Dale Cooper’s dream about the Red-Room, a scene from Lydecker Veterinary Clinic that features Agent Cooper and a Llama getting acquainted; and a grim miniature recreation of the body of Laura Palmer resting on the beach wrapped in plastic. While they are pricey ($58-$94 bucks a pop) they are really well done and it’s my hope that the talented German artist will continue to create others as I’m quite sure the one’s currently available at Boxartig will quickly disappear (the Lydecker’s Vet diorama already has).

Images of Kristina’s tiny homages to Twin Peaks follow.
 

A diorama based on the Lydecker Veterinary Clinic in ‘Twin Peaks.’
 

 
More after the jump…

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
Fortune Cookie Porn Portraits

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New York artist Kalen Hollomon creates disruptive collages exploring commerce, fashion, gender identity and the taboo through everyday images. His work examines “the ever-changing relationship between subject and object.”

“I am always concerned with what lies beneath the surface.

“I hope to create conversation that is rooted in questions related to learned social rules, identity, the subtext of everyday situations and perception. Above all, I try to capture a sense of romance in images that are spontaneous and slightly unnerving.”

 
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Hollomon’s collages juxtapose images of sports stars with fashion models and porn actors, celebrities and brand names with down and outs and environmental disaster, porn with the utterly mundane.
 
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Hollomon photographs his collages on his smartphone and shares them via his Instagram account. He has a following of over 100,000.

All subversive art is ultimately subsumed by the establishment it attacks. Hollomon’s success subverting the medium has led to a demand for his work from the very fashion magazines and brands he satirizes—Gucci, Calvin Klein and Vogue have all commissioned him or used his work.
 
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His most recent project Fortune Portraits combines pages from porn mags taped over with happy, predictive tidings from fortune cookies.

Sayings like: “Business is a lot like playing tennis; if you don’t serve well, you lose,” “Expect much of yourself and little of others” and “Financial hardship in your life is coming to an end!” are plastered across wet-lipped young models who look directly (and suggestively) at the viewer creating a false sense of sexual intimacy and arousal. In the same way the fortune cookie promises some false good tidings to whoever happens to read it.

Hollomon describes the Fortune Portraits as being about “open-ended questions, seduction and desperation, both the wild unknown and the cliche, false promises and first impressions.”

Prints of the Fortune Portraits series are for sale—details here. More of this interesting artist’s work can be seen here.
 
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More of Hollomon’s work, after the jump….

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Chilling pictures of the nuclear ghost town located in the Chernobyl ‘exclusion zone’
09.26.2016
12:04 pm

Topics:
Art
History

Tags:
Chernobyl


 
In April 1986, a terrible accident took place at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in what was then the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic. The event took place during a systems test at reactor number 4; there was a sudden and unexpected power surge, and an emergency shutdown procedure rapidly led to a much larger spike in power output, which caused a reactor vessel rupture. A series of steam explosions exposed the graphite moderator of the reactor to air, causing it to ignite. A plume of highly radioactive fallout spread over the western Soviet Union and Europe. Thirty-one people died during the accident.

Within a year 135,000 people were evacuated, and the city of Pripyat, which had had a population of about 50,000, was rendered almost entirely empty. Wikipedia gives its current population as less than 200. Photographer Guy Corbishley documented the eerie wasteland created by the accident and evacuation. He is responsible for all of the pictures on this page.

The USSR military established the Exclusion Zone very soon after the accident. It stretches 30 kilometers (about 19 miles) in all directions from the power plant. It is 100% free of human life except for roughly 300 stubborn individuals who have refused to leave.

Fascinatingly, the local wildlife is apparently thriving in the exclusion zone, which has prompted scientists to rethink their understanding of the effects of nuclear radiation. The absence of human competition or disruption has allowed other species to assert themselves again.

The Exclusion Zone has purportedly become more popular as a region for “extreme” tourism.
 

 

 
More pics after the jump…...

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Witty and macabre Addams Family coloring book from 1965
09.23.2016
03:13 pm

Topics:
Art
Television

Tags:
coloring books
Addams Family


 
I’ve been following that “pick 3 fictional characters to represent you” game on Facebook with great pleasure. I’m dead certain that more than a few people in the Dangerous Minds readership have picked Morticia Addams as one of their role models….. then there’s Wednesday, I"ll bet Wednesday made some lists…. or Gomez? How about Gomez? Give Gomez some love!

The Raul Julia/Anjelica Huston movies of the 1990s were all well and good, but for me nothing beats the eccentric and buoyant Addams Family TV series of the 1960s. (We mustn’t, however, forget the essential contributions made by Charles Addams in the pages of The New Yorker.) John Astin and Carolyn Jones were pitch-perfect as the morbid and independent-minded heads of family. Just yesterday we featured some death-obsessed cartoons that succeeded in getting readers’ attention, but really, who beats the Addams Family at that game?

Nobody, that’s who.

This charming coloring book was produced in 1965, the second year of the series, with a bitchin’ color cover. My favorite page here is the one with the caption “Touché, Darling!” because the joke, as far as I can tell, is simply that they’re weird because they enjoy fencing in the middle of the day, while the rest of the world is at work. No wonder the Addams Family are such great role models!
 

 

 
More excellent Addams Family images after the jump…..

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
What a Buzzcock did next: Drummer John Maher’s stunning photographs of abandoned homes

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‘Rust in Peace.’

The chance decisions we make in our teens can sometimes bring wondrous returns.

John Maher was just sixteen when he was asked to play drums for a local band called the Buzzcocks in 1976. The Buzzcocks had been formed by Peter Shelley and Howard Devoto in Manchester in late 1975. Maher didn’t really think about it—he just said yes. His first gig playing drums with the band was supporting the Sex Pistols at their second (now legendary) appearance at the Lesser Free Trade Hall, Manchester, in July 1976.

When he was eighteen, Maher bought his first camera—an Olympus Trip—just prior to the Buzzcocks tour of America in 1978. Photography was something to do on the road—but for Maher it was soon became a passion.

After the Buzzcocks split in 1981, Maher played drums for Wah! and Flag of Convenience. But his interest in music waned. When the Buzzcocks reformed in 1989, Maher opted out—only ever making occasional guest appearances with the band.

Maher had an interest in drag racing which led to his launching an incredibly successful business making high performance engines—John Maher Racing. His engines and transmissions are described as the best built in the UK. The success of his company allowed Maher to retire. It was then that he returned to photography.

In 2002, Maher relocated from Manchester to the Isle of Harris in Scotland. The beautiful, bleak Hebridean landscape was in stark contrast to his busy post-industrial hometown of Manchester. The land inspired Maher and he became fascinated with the deserted crofts dotted across the island. Homes once filled with working families and children now lay abandoned in disrepair—belongings scattered across wooden floors, empty chairs faithfully waiting for a new owner, wallpaper and paint drifting from the walls, windows smashed, and gardens long untended.

Maher started documenting these abandoned buildings that spoke more to him about human life than most museums. He took long exposures to achieve a certain look—often blending analogue and digital images to create the best picture. For example, the photograph TV Set was created from “a compilation of nine separate exposures.”

His fascination with the deserted crofts started an idea to have these homes reclaimed and reused bringing new life back to the island. As Maher told the BBC earlier this year:

“What started out as a personal project—documenting abandoned croft houses in the Outer Hebrides—has had an unexpected side effect.

“As a result of displaying my photographs, there’s now a real possibility of seeing at least one of the properties becoming a family home once again.”

Maher’s photographs led to a joint venture by the Carnegie Trust and the local housing association to start renovating some of Harris’s derelict buildings for habitation. Maher’s photographs have been exhibited on the isle and across the UK. “It shows,” he says, “that looking through a lens to the past can help shape things in the future.”

See more of John Maher’s work here.
 
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‘Waiting Room.’
 
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‘Blue Chair.’
 
More of ex-Buzzcock John Maher’s work, after the jump….

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
These adorable cartoons are dark as fuck
09.22.2016
01:36 pm

Topics:
Amusing
Art

Tags:
macabre humor


 
These cartoons are a bit like what you’d get if you combined Ziggy (already a bleak little production) and Eraserhead. The artist is Gypsie Raleigh, an artist and playwright who lives in Portland, Oregon. Earlier this year she published a novel called Soolie Beetch and the Dying Light.

Raleigh has said of her work:
 

Sometimes life leaves me speechless. When I fail to find the words, I try to find an image that can speak in my silence. My drawings have been inspired by everything from the deaths of people close to me, anxiety, and my own broken heart–to seeing an old bird cage or having a bad work day. I turned to art, because my parents raised me off grid in the Mount Hood Wilderness, and there wasn’t anything better to do. At the time, I was just sad that I didn’t have friends. Now, it’s a way of life.

 
Enjoy these ice-cold examples of macabre humor.
 

 

 
More Kafkaesque yuks after the jump…...

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
A Naked Alphabet: The Human Body as Typography (NSFW)

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To paraphrase L. P. Hartley: The 1970s is a foreign country: they do things differently there.

The sexual liberation that favored metropolitan areas in the 1960s spread across country during the seventies. Suddenly—or so it seemed—everybody was enjoying the “zipless fuck.” There were guide books offering useful tips on how to have a better sex life. Married couples were swinging. Nudity was celebrated. Porn was ubiquitous. Orgasms compulsory. Yet, it was still very much the male heterosexual eye that influenced everything.

In 1971, a small group of Dutch artists, photographers and graphic designers—Ed van der Elsken, Anna Beeke, Pieter Brattinga, Anthony Beeke, and Geert Kooiman captured this (newish) sexual freedom with a naked human alphabet—published in Avant Garde Magazine No.14: Belles Lettres. The letters were created using naked women—who lay, curled and bent into the appropriate shapes.

But this wasn’t just mere titillation—this artful display of female nudity was a protest “against the supposedly ‘dehumanising’ and thoroughly ‘indecipherable’ mechanistic alphabets.”

The typeface (in case you’re wondering) for these photographs is said to be Baskerville Old Face.
 
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More barenaked letters, after the jump…

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Those notorious naked Trump statues are starting to be released to the wild
09.22.2016
10:30 am

Topics:
Amusing
Art
Politics
U.S.A.!!!

Tags:
Trump


 
As Dangerous Minds—and pretty much every online source of news or cultural info—reported about a month ago, an edition of five utterly monstrous and hilarious statues of a nude Donald Trump, titled “The Emperor Has no Balls,” appeared all at once in five American cities, namely Los Angeles, Seattle, New York, San Francisco, and Cleveland. Most of those statues were seized by police almost immediately upon their discovery, and all of them are meeting very different fates.

Most notably, the City of Cleveland Heights has released its confiscated statue to the sculptor, Joshua “Ginger” Monroe, for a nominal impound fee of $110. Monroe got his start in haunted house design, has done work for Cirque de Soleil, and served as the director of Eli Roth’s now-defunct Goretorium in Las Vegas, his current city of residence. Cleveland boasts the distinction of being the only non-coastal city to host one of the original five, and it wasn’t chosen just because that city served as the venue for the RNC. There’s a more personal connection, as Monroe originally hails from the Cleveland suburb Garfield Heights, and he requested that one be placed in his hometown.

More after the jump…

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Leave a comment
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