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Color me disenchanted, ‘Coloring for Grown-Ups’ paints a bleak picture
07.24.2014
01:53 pm

Topics:
Amusing
Art

Tags:
coloring books


 
Woe betide those who might cling to the dreams of their youth. You want financial security? Pffft. A rich social life? You gotta’ be kidding! Romantic love? Just who do you think you are? You may not be able to transport yourself back to a time of starry-eyed optimism, but you can reflect on the miserable state of modernity with therapeutic past times of your youth. Coloring for Grown-Ups has it all—self-medication, disaffection, alienation, and yes—the soul crushing disappointment so many of us face daily in our cubicle farms!

And the best part is, you can print out as many as you want. Where else in life do you get a do-over?

You can buy Coloring for Grown-Ups from their website, or get a few samples from The Wall Breakers.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Via The Wall Breakers

Posted by Amber Frost | Discussion
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The gleefully twisted absurdist animations of Chriddof
07.24.2014
08:07 am

Topics:
Animation
Art

Tags:
Chriddof


 

Chris Lyons AKA Chriddof is one of the great enigmas of the Internet. A British culture-jamming, avant-garde surrealist and absurdist mixing video and audio, music and noise, comedy, horror, and retro television altogether into a delightfully incomprehensible, arty mess. And yet he never takes himself too seriously (except for the cases where he decides to close his account[s]); in fact, if you were to ever ask him on YouTube what the sources of any of his videos or the tools he used are, he’ll answer you perfectly straightforward. He’s a strange bloke, but a cool one.—ThornBrain

With his long filmography of not-at-all-very-long films, the English artist Chris “Chriddof” Lyons is a front-runner for best YouTube surrealist ever. Working in so many styles he can barely be said to actually have one, and with an oeuvre spread across multiple media and countless YouTube channels (many of them deleted, some resurrected), he is an exasperatingly mercurial figure in spite of the sheer amount of work he shares with the world. The ‘About’ page on his web site is this…
 

 
...and that’s all. His work, it’s our good fortune, is significantly easier to access than biographical information. He regularly updates a Tumblr with his videos, music, drawings and writings. Many of his videos are rhythmically edited and really, really funny found media cut-ups, but the pieces I’m keen to share with you are his twisted 3D animations. He warps what appear to be rudimentary DAZ or Poser figures into short, freakish, body-horror creations that make me laugh even as I’m weirded out, baffled or horrified, which is a hell of a neat trick.
 

 

 
SO MUCH MORE after the jump…

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Discussion
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De Stijl-styled wine bottles inspired by ‘The Simpsons’
07.24.2014
07:44 am

Topics:
Art
Drugs
Television

Tags:
Piet Mondrian
De Stijl
wine


 
Russian designers Constantin Bolimond and Dmitry Patsukevich have created these awesome wine bottles depicting Marge and Homer Simpson in the style of Piet Mondrian—arguably the most recognizable artist of the De Stijl movement. However, the kitschy appeal of the bottles is part and parcel to the suspicious beverage inside, which is described as “wine, or maybe not?”

The drink was brought to life together with the cartoon characters in 1987. Maybe it is wine, maybe not. We are inviting you to find out yourselves. The contents have been kept secret for already 26 years now. While the ingredients remain the same, their proportions differ from time to time. That is why you will never get bored from this drink! We can assure you that you will not be left disappointed.

No information is given beyond that, but there’s a website given that both leads to nowhere and misspells Marge’s name (www.homer&mardge.com)—mysterious, huh?. Twenty bucks says this is just 26-year-old malt liquor in a cleverly wrapped bottle, but the appeal of the project is the novelty, not the “wine” within.

I’m not above a little gross booze, but I definitely drawn the line at “mystery booze,” Simpsons-themed or otherwise. Besides, wouldn’t beer be the proper beverage for a project like this? Then again, the secret-Simpsons booze is 13% alcohol, and you can’t argue with… efficiency.
 

 

 
Via Juxtapoz

Posted by Amber Frost | Discussion
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Gorgeous psychedelic handbills and posters from Detroit’s Grande Ballroom, circa 1967-68


 
Simply stunning vintage handbills for Detroit’s historic live music venue The Grande Ballroom. The majority of these trippy handbills and postcards were designed by Gary Grimshaw (who died in January of this year) and Carl Lundgren. Historically significant, yes, but from a design perspective, these are just jaw-droppingly, face-melting goodness, aren’t they?


 

 

 

 

 
More after the jump…
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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Bohn Aluminum and Brass Corporation’s futuristic machinery concept art
07.22.2014
11:34 am

Topics:
Art

Tags:
futurism


“Here Comes the Flying Bus,” 1946
 
You might remember my post from a while back on Bohn Aluminum and Brass Corporation’s anti-communist propaganda. As ominous/absurd as capitalist agitprop from the bossman may seem, Bohn was actually building on a prior artistic legacy, albeit one of a much less reactionary vision for manufacturing.

The images you see below are all from Arthur Radebaugh, who produced tons of gorgeous art deco future-looking concept art for Bohn. The sleek designs and seamless use of the airbrush technique are as distinctive as they are dated, and by the mid-50s his commercial appeal had waned as photography replaced illustration in visual advertising. However Radebaugh’s visions found new life in the wildly popular Sunday newspaper comic “Closer Than We Think!” The comics lack the depth of Radebaugh’s ad work, but they allowed him to crank out idea after idea to a future-hungry 1950’s audience.
 

Lawnmower, 1945
 

Firetruck, 1945
 

Cruise ship, 1946
 

Heavy machinery, 1947
 

Covered bridge, 1946
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Amber Frost | Discussion
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Sherlock Holmes recreated as police composite sketch
07.21.2014
06:04 am

Topics:
Art
Books

Tags:
Sherlock Holmes

kcolrehssemloh.jpg
 
We all have a different image of Sherlock Holmes usually associated with the actor we first saw playing the great detective. For some it will be Bendedict Cumberbatch with his petulant manner and curly question-marked hair; or the intense white-faced Jeremy Brett and his quivering flared nostrils; or Peter Cushing forever toying with a prop; or better still the pipe-clenching good sportsmanship of Basil Rathbone, who was my celluloid introduction to Sherlock Holmes in the 1970s.

Of course, these are all variations on a theme and we have to go those timeless tales by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, in particular the first full novel of Holmesian adventure A Study in Scarlet to find a description of the man himself:

His very person and appearance were such as to strike the attention of the most casual observer. In height he was rather over six feet, and so excessively lean that he seemed to be considerably taller. His eyes were sharp and piercing, save during those intervals of torpor to which I have alluded; and his thin, hawk-like nose gave his whole expression an air of alertness and decision. His chin, too, had the prominence and squareness which mark the man of determination.

But how would Holmes look if we were to make a modern composite police sketch based on this description?

Well, this is exactly what Brian Joseph Davis has done over at his The Composites web page, where he uses police sketch software to create composite portraits of famous literary figures.
 
kcolrehs1.jpg
 
His Sherlock Holmes has a hint of Midge Ure from Ultravox circa early eighties mixed with thin lips of William S. Burroughs.
 
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Here you’ll also find Emma Bovary from Madame Bovary, Rochester from Jane Eyre, and Keith Talent from Martin Amis’ Money, who looks uncannily like the comic Jimmy Clitheroe.
 
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Even Humbert Humbert from Lolita (who looks a little like Alan Arkin meets an aging David Byrne).
 
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And Daisy Buchanan from The Great Gatsby—though she lacks the fatal beauty of the character in the book.

I guess that’s my problem with these images—they all begin to look the same after a while, and the uniformity of design makes them drab, lifeless, like formulae for a human equation. Anyway, here’s Peter Cushing to breathe some life into Sherlock Holmes in this BBC production of A Study in Scarlet.
 

 
H/T Nerdcore

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
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Communism in textiles: Soviet fabrics from the 20’s and 30’s
07.18.2014
08:31 am

Topics:
Art
Design
History

Tags:
Soviet Union
USSR
communism


 
If you walked by a set of curtains made from one of these fabrics, you might not pick up on a communist star or the CCCP acronym. Many of the designs below are thematic of classical Russian art; you see lush color, dense scapes and even the odd Orientalist trope (note the pattern with the camels).

Anything more than a quick glance however, might reveal romantic depictions of farmers and factory workers, often rendered in the angular, geometric lines of Soviet Constructivism. Even more explicit are the references to Soviet ambitions of modernization. We see tractors, cars, airplanes, trains and smoke stacks—all the promise of an industrialized workers state.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 
More Soviet textiles after the jump…

Posted by Amber Frost | Discussion
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Ornately embellished wolf and goat skulls inspired by Norse myth
07.18.2014
06:11 am

Topics:
Art

Tags:
skulls
Tamara Howell
Norse myth


 
Iowa artist Tamara Howell has undertaken a series of sculptures inspired by Norse myth, and among those pieces are five jaw-droppingly lovely skulls—two wolves, three goats—beautifully embellished with, as her web site simply states, “clay and mixed media.” I’d love to know more about her process, but, perhaps with an eye towards maintaining a mystique, Howell seems to demure on those details.
 

 

 

”Sköll Devours the Sun”
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Discussion
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The doodly Picasso faces of Norman Mailer
07.17.2014
08:07 am

Topics:
Art
Literature

Tags:
Norman Mailer
Pablo Picasso

Norman Mailer
 
Norman Mailer’s admiration for Pablo Picasso is well known; in 1995 he published a book, Portrait of Picasso as a Young Man: An Interpretive Biography about the modernist master.

According to Amy Weiss-Meyer at The New Republic, Mailer would frequently take his two daughters to what he called “the Church of MOMA,” where they often would find themselves admiring this or that Picasso masterpiece. He also loved to draw, and he commonly sent friends cute little doodles, many of them of the human face. According to Mailer’s daughter Danielle, drawing was a respite from writing, which was a laborious and taxing undertaking. Drawing, on the other hand, was simply fun for him, an escape into pure delight. A new online platform called POBA is hosting a good many of Mailer’s doodles, many of which are reproduced below.

This passage from J. Michael Lennon’s Norman Mailer: A Double Life mentions the doodles: “Most of his correspondents got Xerox copies of one of his drawings, doodles, and cartoons, and faces made of numbers, an idea he says he got from Picasso, who as a boy thought the number seven was an upside-down nose.”

As you can see, there’s a numerological facial portrait in the set, but Mailer opted to use a 1 for the nose, rather than a 7.
 
Norman Mailer
Parted Hair, 1985
 
Norman Mailer
Open Face, 1985
 
Norman Mailer
Ink on paper, 1974
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Martin Schneider | Discussion
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Illustrated history of the world’s worst computer viruses
07.17.2014
07:31 am

Topics:
Art
Science/Tech

Tags:
Computer virus
Bas van de Poel

skulls000.jpg
Skulls by Anthony Burrill
 
The Computer Virus Catalog is an illustrated guide to the worst viruses in computer history.

The project was founded by Amsterdam-based, multi-award-winning writer Bas van de Poel whose fascination with such “evil plots” led to his curating a new art collection of the worst viruses as illustrated by artists around the world.

See the full catalog here.
 

Code Red by Thomas Slater

This refreshing worm exploits a vulnerability in Windows 2000 and NT and initiates a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on the White House website

 
cookiem0000.jpg
 

Cookie Monster by Lawrence Slater

Created in the late ‘60s, Cookie Monster is the world’s first computer virus. After infection, Cookie Monster freezes all system activity and demands cookies….You simply unlock your computer again by typing the word ‘cookie’

 
happy99000.jpg
 
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LSD by Clay Hickson

The LSD virus is far out… This DOS virus overwrites all the files in the current directory and then displays a druggy video effect. Next it shows a message from your local dealer: ‘LSD ViRuS 1.0 Coded By Death Dealer 4/29/94 [TeMpEsT -94]’

 
marburg0000.jpg
 

Marburg by HORT

Marburg infects .EXE and .SCR files and draws the all too familiar critical error icon everywhere on your screen.


 
More illustrated viruses, after the jump…
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
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