follow us in feedly
Crocheted animal skeletons show the grim process of death and decay
05.18.2016
11:25 am

Topics:
Animals
Art

Tags:


 
You know about the idea of the “memento mori,” right? Memento mori is Latin for “reminder of death” (as well as the title of a peculiar novel by Muriel Spark). The practice of tangible reminders of one’s own impending death dates back to ancient Rome, but it has been common throughout Europe from medieval times up through the present day. In the 16th century, Mary Queen of Scots, for instance, owned a large watch carved in the form of a silver skull that was adorned with some poetry by Horace.

In olden times, memento mori often took the form of human skulls intended to be displayed on one’s desk, as a constant reminder of the fact that “a certain convocation of politic worms” (Hamlet, Act 4, scene iii) will be munching at your very corpse one day or other.

For a contemporary instance of the memento mori, you can’t do much better than the recent work by artist Caitlin T. McCormack. For some years now, McCormack has been fashioning fascinating animal skeletons by crocheting cotton string that has been fortified with glue.

As she writes on her website,
 

The act of stiffening intricately crocheted cotton string with glue produces material that is structurally similar to delicate bone tissue. The string implemented in this process can be viewed as the basic cellular unit of fabrication, and by utilizing media and practices inherited from my deceased relatives, I aim to generate emblems of my diminishing bloodline, embodied by each organism’s skeletal remains.

 
The reference to her “deceased relatives” serves as kind a dog whistle to her death-obsessed devotees in the audience.

 

 

 

 

 
Lots more after the jump…....
 

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Girls & guns: Outrageously sexy pulp illustrations from vintage ‘men’s interest’ magazines
05.18.2016
09:39 am

Topics:
Art
Sex

Tags:


‘Surf Pack Assasins’ illustrated by Earl Norem from Male magazine, 1967.
 
Earl Norem was one of many illustrators whose work was featured in various popular “men’s interest” magazines such as Man’s Life, Men, For Men Only, and Action for Men back in the 1950s and 1960s. You may also be acquainted with Norem’s work for Marvel Comics if you were (like me) a fan of comics featuring Conan the Barbarian or He-Man and the Masters of the Universe.
 

‘Carnival Wife’ illustrated by Earl Norem in For Men Only, August, 1970.
 
Norem’s career as an illustrator and painter spans 50 years—and as glorious as his colorful illustrations of a shirtless, musclebound rescuer of half-naked women Conan the Barbarian are in my eyes, it is his illustrations that accompanied the lurid tales within the pages (and on the covers) of the old-school men’s interest mags, that are a real turn on. I mean, how great is your job when you get to illustrate stories titled “Blonde Sex Machine” or “Surf Pack Assassins?” The answer has to be pretty damn great.

Norem retired due to issues with arthritis in 2005, citing his belief that young art buyers didn’t want “anything to do” with an 81-year-old artist, and would instead paint for his own amusement and for his grandchildren. The artist passed away in June of 2015 at the age of 92 leaving us with a vast body of work filled with multi-generational appeal. What’s not to love about a man who fearlessly illustrated a story about a circus bear that assassinated the Nazi Butchers of Stalag 13 (which appeared in the men’s interest magazine “True Action” in 1976)? Nothing, that’s what. The far-fetched, sexed-up, and flat out balls-out illustrations from Earl Norem’s more adult-oriented body of work follow (slightly NSFW).
 

Man’s World, ‘Nazi General Who Ran The World’s Biggest Vice Ring,’ 1963.
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
R. Crumb drawings based on the exploits of Charles Bukowski
05.17.2016
09:42 am

Topics:
Amusing
Art
Heroes
Literature

Tags:


The cover of Charles Bukowski’s short story, ‘Bring Me Your Love’ illustrated by R. Crumb.
 
The seemingly logical collaboration of the great R. Crumb and transgressive writer and poet Charles Bukowski finally became a reality in the early part of the 80s when Crumb created illustrations for two of Bukowski’s short stories, Bring Me Your Love (1983) and There’s No Business (1984).
 

An illustration from ‘There’s No Business’ by R. Crumb.
 
Crumb’s illustrations give the already gritty storylines of both stories visual context—such as a man who looks much like Buk wrestling on the floor with his “wife” after a dispute involving answering the phone or various barroom skirmishes depicting a Bukowski-looking character running amok. The pair would collaborate once again in 1998 (four years after Bukowski’s passing in 1994) with Crumb illustrating a collection of excerpts from Bukowski’s diary, specifically passages from the year prior to his death, The Captain Is Out to Lunch and the Sailors Have Taken Over the Ship. Many of Crumb’s illustrations from all three publications, as well as a few other cartoons images of Charles Bukowski drawn by Crumb follow.
 

 

 
More after the jump…

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
Willem Dafoe gives an art school commencement address: ‘Sleep with more attractive people’
05.17.2016
09:00 am

Topics:
Art
Movies

Tags:


 
Last weekend in Cleveland was shit. Utter. Fucking. Shit. We had snow and 30-degree temperatures in mid-May—the weather here has always been deeply uncooperative, but even by Cleveland standards, that was bizarre. For some reason, a complete baseball game transpired in that freezy, wet weather that couldn’t settle on whether it wanted to rain or hail, and naturally, Cleveland lost that game. Whatever, we’re Cleveland, we’re used to it.

But amid all that, a singularly cool thing happened: on Saturday, Willem Dafoe—the outré-but-still-somehow-mainstream actor who rose to prominence as the murderous counterfeiter in the underrated ‘80s-noir crime drama To Live and Die in L.A., and is probably best known today for his turns as Jesus in The Last Temptation of Christ, a vigilante-chasing FBI agent in Boondock Saints, and for completely owning one of the only two Spider-Man movies worth discussing—delivered the commencement address to the graduating students of the Cleveland Institute of Art—my alma mater, as it happens.

How did this awesome thing happen?

Dafoe’s first credited film appearance was the lead role in 1981’s The Loveless, an outlaw biker film directed by a young Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break, The Hurt Locker) in which Dafoe played the leader of a gang that causes trouble in a small town on its way to Daytona for a race. One of the co-producers of that film was one Grafton Nunes, who since 2010 has served as President of the Cleveland Institute of Art, so perhaps a favor was being returned here.

Dafoe addressed the students about what sustained and inspired him “through 40 years career both above and below ground” and the value of cross-pollination among different art forms, especially with regard to his younger days in avant-garde theater.

…for the most part it was untrained people making homemade shows. It was a time where dancers were making films, actors were painting, visual artists were performing, and everybody was making music. There was an amateur do-it-yourself aesthetic that wasn’t pursuing recognition or acceptance outside of a certain social circle. Often, the works were sloppy, incomprehensible, lazy, obtuse, and truly just bad. These people weren’t careerists—there was no career to be had in these forms. The most they could hope for to parlay their success into was to sleep with more attractive people in the downtown scene. But, there was something there in some of the work that exhibited extraordinary personal commitment, emotion, and abandon I had not seen elsewhere. For me, these qualities trumped all training and technique.

Having been one of the kids in one of those seats years ago, I don’t know if that’s exactly what I would have wanted to hear after spending years of my life and tens of thousands of borrowed dollars learning training and technique, but you can’t deny that point! It’s a great and genuinely inspiring speech about the process of making, and you can watch it in its entirety, via cleveland.com after the jump…

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Leave a comment
‘The Nasty Terrible T-KID 170’: New doc on one of NYC’s greatest and most legendary graffiti writers
05.16.2016
09:32 am

Topics:
Art
Crime

Tags:


 
World-renowned graffiti artist, Julius Cavero aka T-KID 170,  began his “career” in the mid ‘70s tagging under the name “King 13” for gangs The Bronx Enchanters and The Renegades of Harlem, where he learned how to paint trains. After a gang-related shootout, Cavero suffered three shots to the leg, nearly killing him.

In three weeks of hospitalization following the shoot-out, Cavero sketched endlessly, recreating himself as T-KID 170. At that time, Julius Cavero gave up gang life for street art. That’s not to say he went “straight,” mind you—he was still committing criminal acts of trespassing and vandalism, but those acts made a name for him as one of the most important NYC graffiti artists of the ‘70’s and ‘80s.

T-KID 170 became famous for his unique lettering, illustration style, and extremely prolific train-bombing. In addition to his notable artistic ability, T-KID gained a reputation in the early to mid 1980s as being one of the most feared writers. T-KID’s crew, The Vamp Squad, allegedly robbed and beat many writers attempted to tag trains on their “ghost yard” turf. These guys didn’t fuck around.
 
More T-KID 170 after the jump…

Posted by Christopher Bickel | Leave a comment
Old Playboy covers, ‘doodle-bombed’
05.13.2016
03:43 pm

Topics:
Art
Sex

Tags:


 
I feel like the world would be a better place if more artists and designers had an attitude like Hattie Stewart. She doesn’t take herself too seriously, and she treats the world of pop culture like her own personal playground. Last year she posed for pictures wearing a shirt of her own design that was studded with fake logos for acts like Miley Cyrus, in a style she termed “death metal meets Britney Spears.”

Speaking of which, here’s one of Stewart’s scurrilous “doodle-bombs” on a cover featuring the über-twerker. She also has odd little tattoos on her wrists.

Stewart’s work reminds me of Pee-wee’s Playhouse meets the Paul Frank monkey—painted by Keith Haring. On mescaline.

In this series Stewart takes disrespectful aim at some vintage Playboys, including covers that Harry Crane on Mad Men probably, ah, “enjoyed looking at.”
 

 

 
More Playboy “doodle-bombs” after the jump…....

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Fantastic wooden sculptures of famous movie directors
05.13.2016
12:05 pm

Topics:
Art
Movies

Tags:


Stanley Kubrick
 
I like these mash-up wooden sculptures of Hollywood film directors by artist Mike Leavitt. If you notice, each sculpture references movies the director made. The directors are in the details i.e. Stanley Kubrick’s eyelashes referencing A Clockwork Orange or Hitchcock carved as a bird. 

Each sculpture measures around 18 inches in height. Now as to whether or not these are for sale… I simply don’t know. You can contact Mike Leavitt at his site here to find out. You can also follow Leavitt on his Instagram to see his work in progress. 


 

Alfred Hitchcock
 

An unfinished Quentin Tarantino
 
More after the jump…
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
The hilariously twisted and totally f*cked-up comics of Joan Cornellà—ANIMATED!
05.12.2016
09:09 am

Topics:
Amusing
Art

Tags:


 
Several of us here at Dangerous Minds are big fans of the utterly twisted Spanish illustrator Joan Cornellà. A distinctive stylist and a master of sequential art, Cornellà packs some of the most horrible mutations and atrocities imaginable into bright, colorful six-panel narratives in which his preternaturally chipper characters bear the brunt of appalling misfortunes all smiles. He first appeared in this blog a little over a year ago, when my erstwhile colleague Amber Frost wrote “Cornellà‘s work deals in mutilation and disfigurement, sadistic or oblivious violence, the alienation of modernity and a total disregard for human life. (I know. It doesn’t sound funny, but trust me.)” Spot on. 

Last year, Cornellà launched a Kickstarter campaign to fund the creation of 30 animated shorts, some based on existing cartoons of his, some original works created specifically for animation. The campaign succeeded wildly, netting €91,647. The first one posted, “Mystique,” was released last winter to tease the project for the crowdfunding, but new Cornellà cartoons began appearing on YouTube three weeks ago. (Some possibly unauthorized Cornellà animations are also circulating; what we’ve linked here comes straight from Cornellà‘s own channel.)  All of them are fantastic, demented little hit-and-run gags, ranging in length from 14 to 28 seconds, so we suspect you have time to dig ‘em all. If you’re new to Cornellà’s work and this stuff sends you, you might like to know that his comics have been anthologized in the books Zonzo and Mox Nox.
 

 
A comic cornucopia of cartoon Cornellà, after the jump…

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Leave a comment
Negativland documentary now in the works
05.12.2016
09:06 am

Topics:
Art
Heroes
Music

Tags:


 
It’s been a rough couple years for Negativland fans. In swift succession, the Reaper took members Ian Allen, Don Joyce and Richard Lyons, decimating our heroes but leaving many ensembles of lesser quality intact. When will it be Air Supply fans’ turn to grieve? Why can’t Coldplay or Weezer come up three members short the next time they wish to prance upon the stage and make their guitars go tweedly-deedly-dee? When can others’ shame be our pride?

The good news, as the late Pastor Dick might have reminded us, is that filmmakers William Davenport and Leah Gold are collaborating on the definitive, full-length Negativland documentary, Media about Media about Media: The Negativland Story. (No slight against Craig Baldwin’s wonderful Sonic Outlaws, in which Negativland is only one of several groups profiled.) Better still, Davenport and Gold reckon they have about half of the movie already shot.
 

 
Aiming for the modest goal of $8000, with a projected release date of September, the filmmakers are offering perks that will make a person of healthy appetites drool. A $250 contribution gets you an endless loop “cart” (i.e. old-fashioned radio programmer’s tape cartridge) that belonged to Don Joyce, $1000 purchases all of Negativland’s releases “including many special surprises from the band and the filmmakers,” and $1500 buys the very model plane that appeared on the cover of the outlawed U2 EP. But I’m not saying you should go knock over a gas station and give the money to these nice people, who are so kind and decent, unlike the gas station attendant, who sits there judging you all the time, so mean and miserly.

Among other treats in the trailer below, Mark Hosler and his mother discuss how and whether the documentary should be marketed, Don Joyce (a/k/a C. Elliott Friday, Crosley Bendix, Izzy Isn’t, et al.) goes “Over the Edge,” and David Wills (a/k/a the Weatherman) hints at the “sexual” meaning of “seat bee sate.”

Visit the Indiegogo page for the Negativland documentary here.
 

Posted by Oliver Hall | Leave a comment
H.R. Giger’s nightmarish tarot cards (NSFW)
05.11.2016
12:24 pm

Topics:
Art
Occult

Tags:


 
Sometime in the 1990s the Swiss occultist who goes by the name Akron suggested to his countryman H.R. Giger that he create a set of tarot cards. Giger demurred, claiming a lack of time as well as a lack of interest in the subject—all the while insisting that he was “too superstitious” to take on such a project.

Giger did, however, regard tarot as an interesting venue for his artworks, and he was willing to re-purpose some of his pre-existing images as a tarot deck. The tarot deck featuring Giger’s artworks covers only the major arcana and is known as the Baphomet deck, named after the pagan god you can see depicted in the Alchemy and Devil cards at the top of this post.

It is currently out of print but like most anything, used sets can be purchased online. It seems that a detailed description of Giger’s cards written by Akron is included with the decks. 
 

 
Lauren Davis at io9 surely hit on something when she observed that when you use a deck like Giger’s, it doesn’t matter what cards you draw, they “always predict an unsettling future.”

My favorite part of Giger’s deck is actually the design for the back:
 

 
You can purchase a set for about $50 and up.
 

 
More of Giger’s tarot cards after the jump…....

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Page 2 of 279  < 1 2 3 4 >  Last ›