follow us in feedly
Illustrated history of the world’s worst computer viruses
07.17.2014
07:31 am

Topics:
Art
Science/Tech

Tags:
Computer virus
Bas van de Poel

skulls000.jpg
Skulls by Anthony Burrill
 
The Computer Virus Catalog is an illustrated guide to the worst viruses in computer history.

The project was founded by Amsterdam-based, multi-award-winning writer Bas van de Poel whose fascination with such “evil plots” led to his curating a new art collection of the worst viruses as illustrated by artists around the world.

See the full catalog here.
 

Code Red by Thomas Slater

This refreshing worm exploits a vulnerability in Windows 2000 and NT and initiates a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on the White House website

 
cookiem0000.jpg
 

Cookie Monster by Lawrence Slater

Created in the late ‘60s, Cookie Monster is the world’s first computer virus. After infection, Cookie Monster freezes all system activity and demands cookies….You simply unlock your computer again by typing the word ‘cookie’

 
happy99000.jpg
 
	lsd0000.jpg
 

LSD by Clay Hickson

The LSD virus is far out… This DOS virus overwrites all the files in the current directory and then displays a druggy video effect. Next it shows a message from your local dealer: ‘LSD ViRuS 1.0 Coded By Death Dealer 4/29/94 [TeMpEsT -94]’

 
marburg0000.jpg
 

Marburg by HORT

Marburg infects .EXE and .SCR files and draws the all too familiar critical error icon everywhere on your screen.


 
More illustrated viruses, after the jump…
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
follow us in feedly
Images of LSD, cocaine, meth and other drugs exposed to film
07.16.2014
10:22 am

Topics:
Art
Drugs
Science/Tech

Tags:
LSD
cocaine

Fantasy + Ecstasy
Fantasy + Ecstasy
 
Sarah Schönfeld was working at a Berlin nightclub when she decided to try to find out what the various drugs people were ingesting look like. Much like the apple falling on Isaac Newton’s head, perhaps the story of Schönfeld observing an obnoxious MDMA user will someday become one of the formative myths of scientific inquiry… but somehow, I doubt it. And yet it’s awfully apt.

Schönfeld converted her art studio into a lab, and exposed various drug mixtures in liquid form to film negatives and documented the results. The photographs have been collected in a book called All You Can Feel (Kerber Press), which will be available in late August.

The results mostly conform to general predictions—the only thing missing from the LSD visualization are trails. “Fantasy + Ecstasy” looks like a road map of a fucked-up island kingdom, and cocaine supplies a blue bursting-at-the-seams effect. Others are more surprising. Pharmaceutical speed looks like a Mandelbrot pattern, which kinda makes sense. Meanwhile, adrenaline, perversely, has a sluggish feel. And do my eyes deceive me or does the crystal meth photo feature a small chunk of Walter White’s “Crystal Blue Persuasion” in what appears to be a dystopian snow globe?
 
Cocaine
Cocaine
 
Caffeine
Caffeine
 
Crystal Meth
Crystal Meth
 
LSD
LSD
 
Ketamine
Ketamine I
 
Ketamine
Ketamine II
 
Adrenaline
Adrenaline
 
Heroin
Heroin
 
Pharmaceutical Speed
Pharmaceutical Speed
 
via WFMU

Posted by Martin Schneider | Discussion
follow us in feedly
Creepy anti-communist propaganda from Bohn Aluminum and Brass Corporation, 1952
07.16.2014
07:30 am

Topics:
Art
Class War

Tags:
propaganda
anti-communist


 
Bohn Aluminum and Brass Corporation is most famous in the design crowd for its futuristic advertising campaigns—absolutely gorgeous (and totally campy) illustrations of all the products they dreamed of one day manufacturing. (There’s one of a firetruck that’s so New Wave it should probably be a B-52s album cover.)

Lesser known is that the Detroit-based company was in constant conflict with the quickly radicalizing United Auto Workers membership—the local was actually the first to elect a black president, a surprise to many, despite Bohn’s primarily black labor force.

Sensing danger, Bohn produced an anti-communist campaign, perhaps hoping that a bunch of ominous posters might mold dissent into model employee patriotism. It’s difficult to imagine that any Bohn workers were inspired to fealty by corny sloganeering and a few creepy disembodied (white) hands, but one would hope that the heavy-handed (geddit?) propaganda gave the Detroit proletariat a giggle as they occupied factory floors, organized work stoppages and staged sit-down strikes with over 12,000 workers.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Amber Frost | Discussion
follow us in feedly
Roman shower: How to turn an ordinary shower head into a vomiting girlfriend?
07.15.2014
08:20 am

Topics:
Amusing
Art
Sex
Unorthodox

Tags:
shower heads


 
Japanese blogger ARuFa wanted to spice up his bathroom because he thought it was ugly and boring. In order to “gorgeous-ify” it, he came up with the brilliant idea of the DIY lady (girlfriend?) shower head! Now this is coming from a Japanese website and I do not speak or read Japanese so I’m at the mercy of Google Translate. I *think* this is what’s going on. I mean, he does seem rather pleased with the end results, doesn’t he?

While I applaud AruFa’s creativity—you can’t say he wasn’t thinking outside the box—but this emetophile‘s…. er… “wet dream” is the most horrifying shower head I’ve ever seen! I don’t think he has many girls over to his place, what do you think?

The step-by-step visual instructions are below. You can read them here IF YOU’RE INTO THIS KIND OF THING…
 

 

 

 

 

 
See the horrifying results after the jump…
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
follow us in feedly
Meet the great ‘English eccentric’ who financed the Surrealists

ettirgamjames.jpg
 
You may not have heard of Edward James, but you will certainly recognise the back of his head from the painting Not to be Reproduced by René Magritte. This was one of two portraits the Surrealist artist did of James, the other was The Pleasure Principle.

Edward William Frank James (1907–1984) was a poet and a patron of the arts, who used his vast wealth to publish writers (like poet John Betjeman), commission theatrical productions most notably Les Ballets and Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill’s last work together The Seven Deadly Sins in 1933. He also supported individuals, communities in Mexico and financed artisan workshops, but James is most famously known for his patronage of Surrealist art, in particular the artists Magritte, Leonora Carrington and Salvador Dalí. He also bought works by Giorgio de Chirico, Paul Klee, Pavel Tchelitchew, Pablo Picasso, Alberto Giacometti, Max Ernst and Paul Delvaux.

Being rich and aristocratic usually meant James was described as a great “English eccentric,” though he was never fond of the term claiming he was like “the boy with green hair,” just born that way. According to James he was the illegitimate son of King Edward VII, which may have indeed been possible as his mother was said to have been one of the royal’s many mistresses. When he was five, his father (or at least his mother’s husband) died leaving James the sole heir to his fortune and the 8,000 acre family estate of West Dean House in Sussex. James eventually gave away the family estate, financing its reuse as a college. He created his own Surrealist home in Monkton, and then in Las Pozas, Mexico, where he used his money to support its community employing villagers to build houses, a hotel, Surrealist sculptures and architectural follies.

This delightful film The Secret Life of Edward James made in 1978 was narrated by the late jazz singer, art critic and writer George Melly. James and Melly were good friends, united by their passion for Surrealism. Melly was a wonderfully outrageous and much loved performer whose exuberance for life was often matched by his attire. He also wrote three highly entertaining volumes of autobiography and released a whole bag of recordings. If you haven’t heard of George Melly he is worth investigating.
 
ettirgamsemaj2.jpg
Magritte’s other portrait of Edward James ‘The Pleasure Principle’ (1937).
 

 
More after the jump…

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
follow us in feedly
Handpainted Calvin and Hobbes Vans shoes
07.14.2014
10:14 am

Topics:
Art
Fashion

Tags:
Vans
Calvin and Hobbes


 
Sweet Calvin and Hobbes handpainted Vans by Laces Out Studios. It’s not entirely clear on their website how much they are or how to order a pair. I’d message them via their “Contact” and hopefully they’ll respond.


 

 

 
Below, Beastie Boys’ Licensed to Ill shoes:


 
Via Nerdcore

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
follow us in feedly
‘The Executive Coloring Book’ is a vicious satire of post-war America (and self-important jerks)
07.11.2014
03:09 pm

Topics:
Amusing
Art
Drugs
History

Tags:
The Executive Coloring Book


 
I had a pretty good laugh reading The Executive Coloring Book published in 1961 by Marcie Hans, Dennis Altman, and Martin A. Cohen. Even though this book is well over 50 years old, it’s witty, smart and still kinda… relatable? Who doesn’t want to pop a “pink pill” at the end of the day after working at a dull job? That’s evergreen. Timeless!

According to A Hole in the Head blog:

The early 60’s showed the strain on an America post-war populations that were struggling with the idea that they fought for freedom only to be forced to live in glass buildings and conform to the ‘status quo’. It was the age of The Apartment and The Sweet Smell of Success.

While some of its humor is dated, I got a kick out it. Maybe you will too. You may even want to print out these puppies and color them in all grey…


 

 

 

 

 

 
Read the rest after the jump…
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
follow us in feedly
Photo series of Americans lying in seven days worth of their own garbage
07.11.2014
06:06 am

Topics:
Art
Environment

Tags:
Gregg Segal


 
7 Days of Garbage could have come off way preachier if the subjects weren’t photographed portrait-style—some of these folks are absolutely working the camera! Households and individuals were shot among a week’s worth of their own garbage, and while the results aren’t really a shock, the fakey-nature sets really drive home the reality that human beings don’t live “outside” of the environment—the trash has to actually go somewhere. As photographer Gregg Segal puts it, “We’ve made our bed and in it we lie.”

It’s worth pointing out that not all garbage is created equal. Biodegradable orange peels aren’t really comparable to a plastic milk jug or used diapers, the latter of which I notice to be conspicuously absent from the pictures featuring a sweet-faced infant or toddler. It’s quite possible those families do cloth diapering (or didn’t feel like bringing clean diapers to the shoot to represent the used ones), but it might be even more interesting to show the sheer bulk of disposable nappies required to keep a baby happy, healthy and clean.

The tragedy in all of this is the fact that our refuse output can’t be solved by conscientious consumerism. Reducing waste will require political intervention and modifying our manufacturing practices. Until that happens, we’re just going to be… kind of filthy. New Yorkers can check out 7 Days of Garbage at The Fence, in Brooklyn.
 

 

 

 
More people and their garbage after the jump…

Posted by Amber Frost | Discussion
follow us in feedly
Incredible H.R. Giger bar puts you in the belly of the Xenomorph
07.10.2014
10:34 am

Topics:
Art
Food

Tags:
H.R. Giger

Giger Bar
 
H.R. Giger’s art is among the most recognizable in existence—it’s very easy to identify something he made, and the unbelievable bar attached to the museum dedicated to his work in Gruyères, Switzerland, is no exception. Amazingly, it’s not the only one in existence—at various times four locations have been able to boast a Giger Bar, two in Switzerland (the other one is in Giger’s birthplace, the town of Chur), one in New York City, and one in Tokyo. But the ones in Switzerland are the only ones that are open today.

The New York branch was located in Peter Gatien’s legendary Limelight nightclub in the Chelsea neighborhood, but once it closed in the 1990s, the Giger Bar closed with it. The story of the ill-fated Tokyo version is even more fascinating:
 

A fourth Giger bar was located in Shirokanedai, Tokyo in the late 1980s. Giger dissolved his involvement with this location after facing frustrations with Japanese building codes and with the Japanese company behind the bar, which created the bar after only rough preliminary sketches. Giger had wanted private booths that functioned as individual elevators which traveled up and down the interior four stories of the design. This design was problematic given restrictions caused by earthquake resistant engineering. Giger disowned the Tokyo Giger Bar and never set foot inside. Within a few years, the establishment was out of business.

 
Giger Bar
One of Giger’s sketches for the bar
 
The description of the bar on the museum’s website is suitably Gigerian:
 

The interior of the otherworldly environment that is the H.R. Giger Museum Bar is a cavernous, skeletal structure covered by double arches of vertebrae that crisscross the vaulted ceiling of an ancient castle. The sensation of being in this extraordinary setting recalls the tale of Jonah and the whale, lending the feel of being literally in the belly of a fossilized, prehistoric beast, or that you have been transported into the remains of a mutated future civilization.

 
The Giger Bar is open every day of the week, except that between November and March it is not open on Mondays.
 
Giger Bar
 
Giger Bar
 
Giger Bar
 
Giger Bar
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Martin Schneider | Discussion
follow us in feedly
Otto Dix captures the violence and brutality of war’s front lines in ‘Der Krieg’
07.10.2014
08:24 am

Topics:
Art

Tags:
Otto Dix


Stormtroopers Advancing Under Gas
 
When World War I broke out, German artist Otto Dix volunteered for the army. He spent three years amidst some of the most horrifying violence imaginable before being discharged a few weeks after the war’s end. He returned home with a nasty case of PTSD and a new artistic motivation, helping to form the progressive, pacifist artists’ collective, the Dresden Secession. In 1923, he debuted The Trench, an anti-war painting so disturbing the museum hid it behind a curtain. The Mayor of Cologne not only backed out of purchasing The Trench, he got the museum director fired for even displaying it.

A year later, he published Der Krieg, a collection of 50 etchings inspired by the war, a sampling of which you see here. The harsh lines and brutal textures exude a violent intensity that seems to accost the viewer. (If you recognize a bit of “gonzo” in the illustrations, you’re picking up on one of Ralph Steadman’s major influences.) Dix was quickly labeled a degenerate artist when the Nazis took power, and over 260 of his paintings were seized—many of them burned. For a long time The Trench was believed to have been among them, but a bill of sale exists from 1940, leaving many with the hope that it may still be rediscovered someday unharmed.

Although Dix was eventually absorbed into the Nazi propaganda machine, (forced to paint properly nationalist landscapes), he secretly continued to paint anti-Nazi art—many pieces were later found in the 2012 Munich artwork discovery. At one point Dix was even arrested under suspicion of trying to assassinate Hitler, but the accusation was spurious and he was released. In a horrible irony, the pacifist Dix was conscripted into the Volkssturm. He was eventually captured by the French, but he was released at war’s end, and lived to see his work like Der Krieg, extolled all over the world.
 

Soldier’s Grave Between the Lines
 

Buried Alive - January 1916, Champagne
 

Gas victims - Templeux-la-Fosse, August 1916
 

Crater Field Near Dontrien Lit Up by Flares
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Amber Frost | Discussion
follow us in feedly
Page 2 of 209  < 1 2 3 4 >  Last ›