follow us in feedly
Brad Elterman’s strikingly candid photos of rock stars in the 1970s
07.17.2011
10:11 pm

Topics:
Art
Music

Tags:
Brad Elterman
Like It Was Yesterday


Phil Spector before the fall.
 
Photographer Brad Elterman was smack dab in the middle of L.A.‘s rock and roll vortex at a pivotal time in the 1970s. His camera caught some of the energy of the moment in sharply etched fragments of time.

Elterman’s career started with a borrowed camera at the age of 16. His first photo, of Bob Dylan performing onstage, was published in 1974.

That lead to endless nights of covering the rock scene in Hollywood encompassing pop, punk and rock bands including Joan Jett and The Runaways, Rod Stewart, David Bowie, the Sex Pistols, Kiss, Queen, Blondie, the Ramones, the Bay City Rollers, Abba, Boney M, Kenny Rogers, The Who, Leif Garrett, Michael Jackson, etc.

“It was my education in life,” says Brad, who left school to travel with bands and visit European magazine editors at the age of 19. “I had a front row seat in life which took me everywhere from Munich to Tokyo to Rio.” Brad toured Japan with teen idol Leif Garret, traveled to South America with German pop stars Boney M, and did tour dates with The Eagles and Rod Stewart, just to name a few.

Elterman has an almost Zen gift of being in the right place at the right time, capturing unguarded moments that seep through the cracks of his subject’s facades. 

He’s published a collection of his extraordinary black and white photos in a limited edition of 500 copies. While “Like It Was Yesterday” seems to have gone out of print, Amazon has a few for sale here. You can also purchase prints of Elterman’s work at his website, which is worth visiting for more detailed views of these and many more photographs and his fascinating descriptions of how they came about. I’m waiting for his memoirs.
 

 

 

Cherie and Marie Currie.
 
A video interview with Brad Elterman and more photos after the jump…...

Posted by Marc Campbell | Discussion
follow us in feedly
Gorgeous stained glass windows of Aleister Crowley, William Burroughs and many more by Neal Fox


 
Take a look at the amazing stained glass portraiture by Neal Fox. Fox’s work reminds me of the work of many different artists, including Gilbert & George, Roy Lichtenstein, even Joe Coleman (composition, not details, obviously!). I’ll bet this exhibition is impressive “in the flesh.”

Daniel Blau Ltd. is pleased to present Neal Fox’s latest project Beware of the God. Fox’s drawings depict a phantasmagoric journey through the detritus and mythology of pop culture. From a life-long obsession with the tales of his dead grandfather, a World War II bomber pilot, writer and hell raiser, his large-scale drawings have developed into increasingly layered celebrations of the debauched and iconoclastic characters whose ideas have helped shape our collective consciousness.

Fox’s latest project takes many of the recurring subjects of his drawings and portrays them through the medium of the stained glass window. As traditional church windows show the iconography of saints, through representations of events in their lives, instruments of martyrdom and iconic motifs, Fox plays with the symbolism of each character’s cult of personality; Albert Hoffman takes a psychedelic bicycle ride above the LSD molecule, J G Ballard dissects the world, surrounded by 20th Century imagery and the eroticism of the car crash, and Johnny Cash holds his inner demon in chains after a religious experience in Nickerjack cave. One quality in particular binds these characters and the others together; a refusal to conform and conviction in their own ideology.

Working with traditional methods at the renowned Franz Mayer of Munich manufacturer, Fox is producing a set of twelve 2.5 metre high stained-glass windows; exhibited in a single room – an alternative church of alternative saints.

Neal Fox’s “Beware of the God” at Daniel Blau Ltd., 51 Hoxton Square, London until August 10th.


 
More after the jump…

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
follow us in feedly
Austin’s Mondo posters to become part of historic archive
07.14.2011
11:59 pm

Topics:
Advertorial
Art
Movies
Pop Culture

Tags:
Alamo Drafthouse
Mondo

Mike Saputo’s poster design for this year’s Fantastic Fest.
 
I’m convinced there’s no better city in the world to be a movie fan than Austin, Texas. Add this to our bragging rights:

Beverly Hills, CA – The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Margaret Herrick Library is partnering with the Austin-based Alamo Drafthouse theater chain to archive the company’s growing collection of original film posters designed by contemporary graphic artists. The first group of the Alamo Drafthouse’s Mondo posters arriving at the Herrick will include the latest print, a poster for the classic horror film “Frankenstein” (1931), created by Drew Struzan.

The Alamo Drafthouse began producing limited-edition silkscreen posters in 2003. Mondo, the company’s art boutique, now produces more than 120 posters annually, and through it prominent artists such as Martin Ansin, Shepard Fairey, Olly Moss, Tyler Stout and Ken Taylor are commissioned to create new art for classic films, as well as alternative posters for contemporary movies such as “Inglourious Basterds,” “True Grit” and “Thor.”

“We are always seeking out the unusual, and the Mondo collection certainly fits the bill,” said the Academy’s graphic arts librarian, Anne Coco. “We are looking forward to working with the Alamo Drafthouse to ensure that its contribution to the art of movie posters will be around for future generations to appreciate.”

This ongoing gift from the Alamo Drafthouse will be housed along with the Herrick’s existing collection of more than 38,000 movie posters. The posters in the library’s collection are stored in climate-controlled vaults, and are scanned and entered into the library’s online catalog, where they can be viewed by the public.

“We’re extremely grateful to the Academy for its interest in archiving Mondo’s poster collection,” said Mondo Creative Director Justin Ishmael. “We’re fans of movie art, first and foremost, and to have our artists’ work archived alongside some of the classics of movie poster art is an incredible honor.”

The Margaret Herrick Library poster collection includes a wide range of works created by noted graphic artists, such as the Stenberg brothers’ constructivist poster for “Man with a Movie Camera” and Wiktor Gorka’s arresting poster for the Polish release of “Cabaret.” The library also holds all of the film posters designed by Saul Bass, including his groundbreaking key art for “The Man with the Golden Arm.”

The Austin Film Festival and Fantastic Fest are coming up in the next few months and Dangerous Minds will be there.

Check out some of the stunning movie posters at Mondo’s website.

Here’s a taste:
 

Shepard Fairey
 

Jesse Philips

 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Discussion
follow us in feedly
Notes towards a portrait of Francis Bacon

image
 
In the final moments of a documentary on Francis Bacon, made by a French TV channel, the great artist turned to camera and jovially announced, in his best Franglais, that he had lost all his teeth to his lovers. That is what he was like –dramatically revealing intimate scenes from his life at the most unexpected of moments. His paintings did the same, as they were images, which unnervingly presented the “brutality of fact,” within the most intimate and commonplace of locations – a bedroom, a living room, a toilet.

I once played Francis Bacon on his deathbed, tended by nuns. It was for a drama-documentary, which examined the Bacon’s work through his asthma. The idea was to find out how much this medical condition shaped the artist’s life. For as Bacon once said to critic John Russell

“If I hadn’t been an asthmatic, I might never have gone on painting at all.”

If this was true, then arguably, it was his asthma that made him a painter, and his asthma, which induced the heart attack that killed him.

Of course, there have been other suggestions as to why Bacon became an artist: the childhood trauma of being locked in a cupboard by the family nanny, or more luridly, as writer John Richardson has claimed, it was Bacon’s masochism that inspired his work. Yet, neither of these fully explain his drive or resilience, or the influence of his strange relationship with his father had on his work.

Bacon was 82-years-old when he died in Madrid, on the 28th April 1992. In many respects, it is a surprise he lived so long.  Bacon was a prodigious drinker, had a damaged and diseased heart, lost a kidney to cancer, and once, nearly lost an eye, after being “pissed as a fart” and falling down the stairs of his favored drinking den. But Bacon had resilience, rather than seek immediate medical attention he merely pushed the offending orb back into its socket, and continued with his afternoon debauch.

Bacon was a gambler. He saw himself as open to the opportunities of chance in both life and art. He made and lost small fortunes on the spin of the roulette wheel. He was an atheist who saw no hope of an afterlife, and gave credence to “the individual’s perceived reality.” He claimed he had been “made aware of what is called the possibility of danger at a very young age,” which led him to treat life as if it were always within the shadow of death:

“If you really love life, you’re walking in the shadow of death all the time…Death is the shadow of life, and the more one is obsessed with life the more one is obsessed with death.  I’m greedy for life and I’m greedy as an artist.”

In the late 1940s, Bacon was told by his doctor he had an enlarged heart. One of his friends, Lady Caroline Blackwood, then wife to artist Lucian Freud, later recounted a tale of a dinner when Francis had joined her and Lucian, at Wheeler’s Restaurant :

“His (Francis) doctor had told him that his heart was in such a bad state that not a ventricle was functioning; he had rarely seen such a diseased organ, and he warned Francis that if he had one more drink or even became excited it could kill him.

“Having told us the bad news he waved to the waiter and ordered a bottle of champagne, and once it was finished ordered several more.  He was ebullient throughout the evening but, Lucian and I went home feeling very depressed.  He seemed doomed.  We were convinced he was going to die, aged forty.”

 

 
More on Francis Bacon and part two of his interview with David Sylvester, after the jump…
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
follow us in feedly
Letterheads as works of art: Wild, weird and beautiful
07.13.2011
06:53 pm

Topics:
Advertorial
Art

Tags:
Letterheads


 
Letterheady is a pretty nifty website devoted to uniquely designed letterheads and stationery of famous people and businesses, from Frank Zappa and Frank Lloyd Wright to the Church Of Scientology.

These are some of my favorites but there are many many more graphic delights (and in some cases absolute atrocities, see the Scientology stationery) to be viewed at Letterheady’s site.
 

 

 

Designed by Barney Bubbles; used in 1973 by Stacia, then-dancer for the band Hawkwind.
 

Charles Manson. ATW stands for air, trees, water and animals
 
More letterheads after the jump…

Posted by Marc Campbell | Discussion
follow us in feedly
Toy soldier skaters
07.13.2011
11:47 am

Topics:
Art

Tags:
skateboards
skaters
toy soldiers
Steve Nishimoto


 
I suppose these plastic toy soldiers by Steve Nishimoto give new meaning to “Skate or Die!” View more of Mr. Nishimoto’s designs over at his website, Nish.net


 

 
(via Nerdcore)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
follow us in feedly
‘The Warriors’ baseball card paintings
07.13.2011
10:44 am

Topics:
Art
Movies

Tags:
Ryan Jones
The Warriors


Yellow Fury
 
The Warriors oil on collage baseball cards by artist Ryan Jones for the “Crazy 4 Cult 5” exhibit at Gallery1988 Melrose. Each baseball card measures 9 x 12 inches and are all listed at $350.00 each. Sadly, it looks like they’re currently out of stock.
 

Blue Fury
 
See Red Fury after the jump…

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
follow us in feedly
Grant Morrison ‘Talking With Gods’ cover art
07.12.2011
10:59 am

Topics:
Art

Tags:
Grant Morrison
Talking With Gods
Camilla d'Errico


 
I believe this is a special limited edition DVD cover (only available at Comic Con 2011) for Grant Morrison documentary Talking With Gods. The delightful illustration of the comic’s mage is by Camilla d’Errico.
 

 
(via Super Punch)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
follow us in feedly
Explore the world of Mod Cinema with Colorspace Vol. 2
07.11.2011
05:07 pm

Topics:
Art
Fashion
Music
Pop Culture
Television

Tags:
ModCinema


 
Dante at ModCinema recently sent me a another volume of his fantastic 2-hour Colorspace compilations exploring the “mod” aestheitic of the 60s/70s.

As I wrote before about the first volume: “Professional graphic designers and design snobs will love it.” One of the ultimate DVDs to leave on at a party. Colorspace Vol 2 might even be better than than its predecessor and that’s a hard act to follow:

Modcinema presents its second two hour compilation of vintage movie trailers, music, and TV ads exploring 60’s/70’s pop culture. This volume features appearances by Raquel Welch, Marianne Faithfull, Soft Machine, Jane Birkin, Cher, Ronnie Bird, Serge Gainsbourg, Nancy & Lee, Johnny Harris Orchestra, Michel Polnareff, Tammi Terrell, Annie Girardot, Shocking Blue, Françoise Hardy, The Carpenters, Anna Karina, and Los Bravos. Fabulous 60’s fashions by André Courrèges, Mary Quaint, Paco Rabanne, choreographed dancing and so more! Plus it comes with cool artwork!

Video quality is A+. Order a copy of Colorspace Vol. 2 at ModCinema.com

Below, one of the treats in store for purchasers of Colorspace Vol. 2, Lee Hazelwood and Nancy Sinatra sing “Some Velvet Morning” on her 1968 NBC TV special, Movin’ With Nancy.
 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Discussion
follow us in feedly
Kubrick’s letter of praise to Ingmar Bergman, 1960
07.11.2011
04:18 pm

Topics:
Art
Movies

Tags:
Stanley Kubrick
Ingmar Bergamn


 
February 9, 1960

Dear Mr. Bergman,

You have most certainly received enough acclaim and success throughout the world to make this note quite unnecessary. But for whatever it’s worth, I should like to add my praise and gratitude as a fellow director for the unearthly and brilliant contribution you have made to the world by your films (I have never been in Sweden and have therefore never had the pleasure of seeing your theater work). Your vision of life has moved me deeply, much more deeply than I have ever been moved by any films. I believe you are the greatest film-maker at work today. Beyond that, allow me to say you are unsurpassed by anyone in the creation of mood and atmosphere, the subtlety of performance, the avoidance of the obvious, the truthfulness and completeness of characterization. To this one must also add everything else that goes into the making of a film. I believe you are blessed with wonderful actors. Max von Sydow and Ingrid Thulin live vividly in my memory, and there are many others in your acting company whose names escape me. I wish you and all of them the very best of luck, and I shall look forward with eagerness to each of your films.

Best Regards,
Stanley Kubrick
 
Via Letters Of Note

Posted by Marc Campbell | Discussion
follow us in feedly
Page 146 of 225 ‹ First  < 144 145 146 147 148 >  Last ›