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Steal Your Face: Real-time face substitution
09.19.2011
07:11 pm

Topics:
Art
Design
Games
Science/Tech

Tags:
special effects


 
“Faces” from Vimeo user Arturo. This is totally badass. Tons of potential here.

Real-time face substitution. Made with Kyle McDonald’s ofxFacetracker + Jason Saragih’s facetracker library, a C/C++ API for real time generic non-rigid face alignment and tracking.

Inspired by Kevin Atkinson’s image clone code.

I like when he goes from being Michael Jackson to Dali to Obama at the end. That’s the best part.
 

 
Via The Daily What

Posted by Richard Metzger | Discussion
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Disney legend Rolly Crump’s drugs, Beatnik & Commie posters, 1960


 
Rolland “Rolly” Crump is a Disney legend. Originally working as an assistant animator under Uncle Walt himself in the early 1950s, Crump performed “in betweener” work on Disney classics like Peter Pan, Lady and the Tramp, 101 Dalmations, and Sleeping Beauty.

In 1959 Crump joined Walt Disney Imagineering, becoming one of Walt Disney’s key designers for Disneyland. He worked on the Haunted Mansion, the Enchanted Tiki Room and the Adventureland Bazaar. Crump served as key designer on the Disney pavilions featured at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, including “It’s A Small World.” When that attraction was given a permanent home at Disneyland, Crump added the iconic puppet children clock at the entrance. He was also one of the lead designers on a Disneyland attraction that was shelved after Disney’s death, The Museum of The Weird.

During his long and illustrious career, Crump contributed to the designs for Walt Disney World, Busch Gardens and the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus World, before returning to Disney to project design “The Land” and “Wonders of Life” pavilions at EPCOT Center. Now in his 80s and still going strong, in 2004 Crump was given a Disney Legends Award.

But back in 1960, Rolly Crump made a series of whimsical and delightful posters depicting Beatniks and their predilection for drugs. Made for poster pioneer Howard Morseburg’s Esoteric Poster Company, Crump worked for Morseburg until 1964, also turning out posters satirizing Communism, Cuba and the Soviet Union. Some of these posters were discovered again and are for sale via Crump’s Zazzle store.
 

 

 

 

 
 
Thank you Taylor Jessen!

Posted by Richard Metzger | Discussion
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Tiny Tim and The Supremes candles by Vicki Berndt
09.19.2011
11:05 am

Topics:
Art
Music

Tags:
Tiny Tim
candles
The Supremes
Vicki Berndt


The Keene Supremes, $45.00
 
I’m digging these Supremes and Tiny Tim candles by Los Angeles-based artist and rock photographer, Vicki Berndt. They’re available for purchase on Vicki’s website or over at her Etsy page.
 

The Coronation of Tiny Tim Candle, $15.00

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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What is not seen: An interview with artist Agnes Martin

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She once wrote:

“In my best moments I think ‘Life has passed me by’ and I am content.”

The outside world didn’t clutter Agnes Martin’s mind. When she died at ninety-two it was said that she hadn’t read a newspaper for fifty years - her vision was focussed solely on her art.

“To progress in life you must give up the things you do not like. Give up doing the things that you do not like to do. You must find the things that you do like. The things that are acceptable to your mind.”

Giving up the things you do not like is always easier when your life is insulated by money, but that kind of insulation didn’t come until Martin was in her late forties. Born in Maklin, Saskatchewan, Canada in 1912, her father died when she was two, leaving her mother with five children to bring up. In such difficult circumstances, Agnes didn’t have the opportunity to develop her artistic interests, but she was fully aware of the beauty that surrounded her, which inspired her belief she had the talent to paint it.

When she was twenty-four, Agnes traveled to New York, where her visits to the museums and galleries convinced her to be an artist.  It took time, for twenty years Martin worked as a teacher, painted every day and burnt her pictures every night, until she was ready. She moved to New Mexico, where food and rent were cheap. Her decision was to paint until her savings ran out, then to starve. She was lucky, the legendary art dealer, Betty Parsons, whose gallery had been the focus for the Abstract Expressionist movement, saw her work in New Mexico in 1957. It led to Martin’s first major show in 1958. It was the start of her successful career that lasted until her death in 2004.

Martin’s work was spiritual and she once described her paintings as being “not about what is seen. They are about what is known forever in the mind.”

“When I think of art I think of beauty. Beauty is the mystery of life. It is not in the eye it is in the mind. In our minds there is awareness of perfection.”

This rare interview with Agnes Martin was recorded at her studio in Taos, New Mexico, by Chuck Smith and Sono Kuwayama, in November 1997, and is quite a revealing and inspirational film.
 

 
With thanks to Surbhi Goel
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
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Stunning slow motion video of Tokyo


 

 
Video by Alex Lee with music by Flying Lotus.

 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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Stuart Sutcliffe: The Lost Beatle

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He couldn’t play the bass, but he certainly could paint. The trouble is, Stuart Sutcliffe never lived long enough to fulfill the destiny his talents promised, tragically dying at the age of twenty-one from a brain haemorrhage.

As The Beatles original bass player, and John Lennon’s best mate, Sutcliffe’s legend has grown over these past fifty years, and this documentary Stuart Sutcliffe: The Lost Beatle examines the short life and long myth of the man who quit the Fab Four to follow his own star.

Told via interviews with an impressive array of Sutcliffe’s family and friends—and through uniquely descriptive quotes from his letters—this hour-long documentary reveals a lot of intimate detail about Sutcliffe’s transition from promising art-school student in Liverpool (and best friend of John Lennon) to reluctant musician (pressed into service by Lennon) to determined painter within the German avant-garde scene. A lot of Stu’s story, as Beatles fans know, is set in Hamburg, during and after the days the group was a house band in the city’s red-light district. Familiar tales of friction between Sutcliffe and Paul McCartney abound. But these are offset by a tremendous amount of fresh insight and detail offered by such important Beatles-saga figures as rocker Tony Sheridan, Klaus Voormann and—most crucially—Astrid Kirchherr, the photographer who influenced the Beatles’ look and who became Sutcliffe’s lover until his death.

 

 
Previously on Dangerous Minds

Jimmie Nicol: The Beatle Who Never Was


 
More on Stuart Sutcliffe, after the jump…
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
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Grant Morrison, Neil Gaiman, Terry Gilliam and others want to ‘Illuminate Parkinsons’


 
This Saturday night in Los Angles, there’s going to be a special art show hosted by Neil Gaiman and actress Fairuza Balk and produced by Dangerous Minds pal Lenora Claire:

“Illuminate Parkinsons” is a benefit for Becky Hurd’s Illuminate charity fighting young onset Parkinson’s disease

The aim of Illuminate is to raise awareness of Young Onset Parkinsons while raising funds to support Parkinsons charities. The Illuminate Parkinsons International Photography Exhibition has been created by Becky’s best friend and celebrity photographer, Allan Amato. This amazing photographic journey into the world of Parkinsons spans two years beginning in September 17th at Pop tART Gallery. Subjects in the exhibit include Terry Gilliam, Neil Gaiman, Kevin Smith and an assortment of other fascinating people all of whom lent their support to the project.

The initial aim of the Illuminate Parkinsons campaign was to raise £100,000 for Parkinsons charities. So far the campaign has generated over £51,000 since it began with the first Illuminate Ball in Birmingham in April 2010. Since the first ball Illuminate Parkinsons has gone from strength to strength with many new fundraising projects.

Illuminate Parkinsons by Allan Amato
Saturday, September 17th, 8-11pm Pop tART Gallery, 3023 W. 6th St., Los Angeles

Posted by Richard Metzger | Discussion
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Patti Smith tribute to Harry Smith
09.14.2011
09:41 pm

Topics:
Art
Music

Tags:
Patti Smith
Harry Smith
Hammer Museum


Harry Smith, the artist as a young man.
 
Last year Patti Smith paid tribute to “filmmaker, musicologist, ethnographer, bohemian, and occultist, Harry Smith” at The Hammer Museum in Los Angeles.

In this simple and sweet video, Patti reads from her memoir, tells stories and sings a Hank Williams tune as well as her own.

The audio makes it sound at times like Patti has a slight speech impediment. It’s kind of endearing.
 

 
Thanks to Punk Not Profit.

Posted by Marc Campbell | Discussion
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The surreal, intricate collage of Lola Dupré
09.14.2011
06:44 pm

Topics:
Art
Unorthodox

Tags:
Glasgow
art
collage
Lola Dupre


 
Like many traditional collage artist, the Glasgow-based Lola Dupré makes all her work out of just paper, scissors and glue. But unlike most artists Lola goes further than relying on a simple juxtaposition of imagery to make a point. Instead she uses multiple copies of source material, employing thousands of cuts and manipulating tiny shards of paper to create a strange, amorphous, almost fractal vision. Her work is like looking at a dissolving reality reflected in a spoon.
 

 

 

 

 
In a recent interview on the Empty Kingdom blog, Lola says this of her modus operandi:

t came about through experiments with paper as a sculptural medium, through a chance arrangement in 3D forms I began to think about applying it in 2D.  I guess the work could say a few different things about me; I think I am meticulous and multi-dimensional as a person, perhaps that comes across in my work, I’m not sure.  In my opinion, I create, and it is up to the viewer to decipher things and find meaning.

You can read the rest of that interview here, and see all of Lola’s work at her website www.loladupre.com - in the meantime, click read on (below) to see more of her exceptional work. 

 

Posted by Niall O'Conghaile | Discussion
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Rear Projection: John Waters’ new art exhibition

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DM favorite John Waters is having a new exhibition of his photographs and sculptures called Rear Projection at the Arthur Roger Gallery, 432 Julia Street, New Orleans, LA, from October 1st – 29th.

Mr. Waters will be present at the opening reception hosted by the gallery on Saturday, October 1st from 6 to 9 pm, and will lead a walk-through of his exhibition on Saturday, October 1st at 1 pm. Now how cool is that?

Rear Projection is a movie term for the process whereby a foreground action is combined with a background scene filmed earlier to give the impression the actors are on location when they are, in fact, working inside a studio.  In John Waters’ latest work, this artificial and outdated visual effect is embraced and taken to extremes.

Using an insider’s bag of tricks and trade lingo, John Waters celebrates the excess of the movie industry. Word and image play permeate Waters’ work, and the movie industry and its various sleights of hand are a common target. Always ambitious and playful, some of the works are condensed narratives or “little movies” as Waters calls them.  Waters wickedly juxtaposes images from films and television that he captured by photographing his television set as they play.  His approach originated with a desire to retrieve stills from his own movies and developed into an appreciation for the overlooked and misrecalled.

Waters has said, “I’m concerned that people don’t remember movies; they remember stills that they’ve seen over and over in books so I try to photograph things in movies that you are never supposed to see.  Really, it’s about writing and editing.  I think up each of these pieces and then I have to go find the images that make a new narrative which many times is the opposite of or has nothing to do with what the director really began with.”

Check the Arthur Roger Gallery for details.
 
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Old Chickens (2009) 9 C-prints (ed.1/5) 5 x 63 inches
 
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John Jr. (2009) C print (ed.5/5) 32 1/2 x 26 inches
 
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Rear Projection (2009) 9 C-prints (ed.5/5) 8 x 90 inches
 
More from the fabulous Mr Waters, after the jump…
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
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