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Life-size replica ‘Game of Thrones’ Iron Throne for sale
06.06.2012
11:49 am

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Art
Television

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The HBO Shop is selling replica Game of Thrones “iron” thrones for $30,000 + a $1,800.00 surcharge for shipping. They’re constructed of fiberglass and fire-proof resin.

This custom chair is designed to mimic the seat of kings in the Seven Kingdoms. On the show, the Iron Throne was constructed by Aegon I Targaryen, the first king of the Seven Kingdoms. He made it from the swords surrendered by his enemies. Legend has it, it’s made of a thousand swords that took 59 days to hammer out into a throne. Spikes and jagged edges in every direction make this one very intimidating lounge

You would think by the insanely high price, that the HBO Shop would have put in some effort and uploaded better photos, but they didn’t. They’re all pretty crappy. You can check ‘em out here.

Via Geekologie

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Paper Prometheus: ‘Prometheus’ trailer made entirely of paper
06.05.2012
01:26 pm

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Art
Movies

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Travis Betz (with help of many “paper pullers”) spent an entire month reconstructing the Prometheus trailer entirely out of paper.

Here’s the original trailer vs. the paper trailer on YouTube Doubler. Watch ‘em in action side by side.
 

 
Via Tastefully Offensive

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Seeking the comic book world’s elusive visionary: ‘In Search of Steve Ditko’
06.04.2012
03:24 pm

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Art
Pop Culture

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Steve Ditko is the Thomas Pynchon of the comic book world. He’s a recluse, has rarely been photographed, interviewed or filmed. But his art is something even the most casual of pop culture observers are familiar with: he created, along with Stan Lee, Spider-Man and Dr. Strange and made significant contributions to the continuing sagas of The Hulk and Iron Man, among other comic book heroes.

I’m not a reader of comic books but I did get into Dr. Strange’s trippy alternate realities in the 1960s. With it’s surreal tales and psychedelic artwork, Dr. Strange was a superhero for hipsters. Ditko’s illustrations filled the panels with brightly-colored surreal images that popped off the page and the stories told ventured into the mystical and phantasmagorical. No question he influenced a slew of young artists to expand the realm of comic book content into what would later be known as “head” comics.

In 1965, a San Francisco gathering took place called “A Tribute to Dr Strange.” With music provided by The Jefferson Airplane and party favors by Owsley, this was one of the first hippie happenings. Ironic that Ditko should exert such a strong tug upon the consciousness of the counter-culture when he himself was a social Darwinist with a right-wing slant who probably loathed the touchy/feely, all-is-one, hippie outlook on life. Ditko’s dog eat dog philosophy (articulated in his Mr A comics) was the anti-thesis of the new age group grope.

Jonathan Ross was one of many young freaks who fell under the spell of Ditko’s pen and in this delightful documentary he sets out to find the illusive artist. First shown on BBC television in September 2007, In Search Of Steve Ditko, takes us on a journey into the life of a man who has done all he can to shift the attention away from the artist to the art. Ross seems so enamored of Ditko that he abandons his usual snarkiness and the film becomes a spiritual pilgrimage of sorts. You don’t have to be fan of comic books to enjoy the trip.
 

 
Previously on DM: Searching For Steve Ditko

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Andrew Breitbart, conservo-martyr warrior, Thalidomide baby
06.04.2012
03:09 pm

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Art
Kooks

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Patriot Depot, your one-stop online shop for crappy conservative “art” and tee-shirts that “humorously” explain to boys wanting to date your teenage daughter that you own a gun have a new item they seem quite proud of, “Fight” this ghastly portrait of ghostly conservo-martyr Andrew Breibart rendered as a glowing with ruddy health, heroic Nordic warrior god with too short arms…

It’s very curious, indeed, isn’t it?

Quoting Wonkette’s “Commie Girl” Rebecca Schoenkopf:

In a previous life, your Editrix spent 12 years as an actual art critic, the kind who never didn’t have a shiv in her pencase and a sneer upon her face. But she always had room in her heart for art atrocities of the naif tradition — Slate pitches taking the form of art reviews, if you will — and this work by David Bugnon is the kind of masterpiece of Outsider art, a veritable holocaust-tsunami of bad taste, for which she would have #warred all those other stupid art critics who were too busy fawning over Richard Diebenkorn or some other AbEx total crap (and 50 years too late) to understand the beauty of a work like Fight. Look at the loving attention paid to the contours of Ghost Andrew Breitbart’s fat face! Look at the fanboy comic-geek detail on that super-bitchen sword and armor! Look at the improperly foreshortened arm, which would have left Ghost Andrew Breitbart with little 18-inch-long stub arms that couldn’t have even reached his pockets! Look at those steely dreamy sexboat eyes, undressing you out of your altarboy cassock! The only problem with Fight that we can possibly see is that David Bugnon got Hell’s lighting wrong.

LOL.

A “limited edition” of this sucker sells for just $3995.00…

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Skateboard tricks in super slow motion
06.04.2012
01:38 pm

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Art
Pop Culture

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I’m late to the game on this one, but if you haven’t seen these flat ground tricks filmed at 1,000 frames per second—you’re surely in for a treat.

The song in the video is “Never Knew” by Funky Notes.
 

 
Via High Definite

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
The human eye as you’ve never seen it before
06.04.2012
01:05 pm

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Art
Science/Tech

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I’ve seen some pretty spectacular close-up shots of the human eye before, but nothing compares to these digital images by photographer Suren Manvelyan, where the iris areas almost resemble alien landscapes. Totally cool.
 

 
More eye-popping photos after the jump…

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
No Globes: Miniature power plant spews a cloud of black pollution when shaken
06.01.2012
01:49 pm

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Art
Environment

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This limited edition snow globe titled “No Globes” was designed by UK-based collective Dorothy to protest the construction of coal-fired power stations back in 2009.

Instead of the usual happy snow globe scene with pristine white snow particles, there’s a power plant spewing a cloud of black pollution.

Via Who Killed Bambi

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Laurie Anderson performs with a ‘pillow speaker’ in her mouth
06.01.2012
12:42 pm

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Art
Music

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Delightful short clip of Laurie Anderson performing a song with a “pillow speaker” at the School of Visual Arts graduates commencement ceremony.
 

 
Thank you kindly Ken Switzer

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Life and Death Mask Making Workshop with Sigrid Sarda
05.31.2012
02:07 pm

Topics:
Art
Design
R.I.P.

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The fine folks over at Morbid Anatomy are holding two special classes with “self taught ceroplast” Sigrid Sarda.

The first class, Life and Death Mask Making Workshop, will be held on Sunday, June 3, from 10 am - 4 pm. Admission is $100 (includes $40 materials fee). This class is part of The Morbid Anatomy Art Academy.

In this class, students will learn to create their very own Life Masks working with alginate—a non-toxic seaweed-based mold making product that is easy on the skin—and plaster. Students will pair up and cast one another, but don’t be alarmed; the workshop’s instructor Ms. Sarda assures us that you will love this experience, and that most everyone who has been cast comes out feeling relaxed to the point of jello, with the extra insentive of a free facial. All materials are included, and each student will leave class home with their face immortalized in plaster.

The second second class, Anatomical Wax Votive Making Workshop, will be held on Sunday, June 24, from 10 am - 4 pm. Admission is $145 (includes $63 materials fee).

In this class, expert wax worker and artist Sigrid Sarda will teach students to create an uncannily lifelike wax votive of the body part of their choice. Each student will leave class with a finished wax votive as well as a knowledge of mold making, wax craft, and the history and meaning of the anatomical votive.

Both of these classes will be held at the Observatory located at 543 Union Street in Brooklyn. RSVP at morbidanatomy [at] gmail.com if you’re interested.
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Behind the Smile: John Cassavetes and his films
05.30.2012
07:21 pm

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Art
Movies

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As a child, John Cassavetes chipped his front teeth in a fight. As his parents were too poor to buy him caps, Cassavetes didn’t smile for years. The experience made him aware of how others coped with misfortune. Later, when he started making films, his camera fixed on the facial tics and movements of his actors. These were unlike any other movies - improvised character studies, where the camera relentlessly followed, watched, examined, but rarely interrogated. We are always close-up to the characters. When we see them in wide-shots, they are isolated, the scene only highlighting their alienation: Ben Gazzara having breakfast outside after losing $23,000 at a gaming table inThe Killing of a Chinese Bookie; or Ben Carruthers taking a stroll through the gardens in Shadows; or Gena Rowlands at a loss with the world in A Woman Under the Influence.

His characters are suburban, middle-aged, all on the back slice of life. They may have flourishes of rebellion (a trip to London in Husbands), but nothing changes their direction, all stick blindly to some instinctual role.

Cassavetes’ films may not be that innovative, or offer any new or considered insights, or offer redemption, but they succeed because of the ineffable passions, the inexpressible humanity of the central characters that Cassavetes puts on screen. That’s where his genius lies - in his deep and committed humanity.

Cassavetes once told Cahiers du Cinema:

‘I am more interested in the people who work with me than in the film itself or cinema.’

Cassavetes’ films always remind me of what Jack Kerouac once wrote about literature in Satori in Paris:

“…the tale that’s told for no other reason but companionship, which is another (and my favorite) definition of literature, the tale that’s told for companionship and to teach something religious, of religious reverence, about real life, in this real world which literature should (and here does) reflect.”

Made in 1965, Cinéastes de notre temps - John Cassavetes is a profile of the great director and actor as he edits his second feature Faces in Hollywood, before taking it Paris. Cassavetes openly discusses his views on film-making and cinema, and why he takes certain roles to pay for his movie making.
 

 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
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