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Big ol’ penis spray-painted on $2.5 million car
10.08.2014
03:09 pm

Topics:
Art
Economy

Tags:
Bugatti Veyron


 
I can’t help but laugh a little at this dick that was childishly graffitied on a Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport (the world’s most expensive production car).

Apparently this all went down in Seattle as the car was parked on a city street. No one has copped to the vandalism yet, so the motivation behind the graffiti is still unclear (but I don’t think it takes a brain surgeon to figure why this happened or the message). 

I can’t imagine the owner of the Bugatti Veyron was too thrilled to see a primitively rendered spray-painted dick on his or her car, but it sort of comes with the territory when such an opulent chariot is parked among the proletariat, don’t you think?

The owner has, so far at least, not revealed his or her identity.


 
Via Metro and h/t Death and Taxes

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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Cartoonists document Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement


Art by Luis Simoes
 
The last few days have seen no small amount of drama in Hong Kong, as disenfranchised students are calling attention to their lack of political freedoms. The students have taken up umbrellas to protect themselves from the massive amounts of tear gas the riot police have used as a means of restoring order. 

On Facebook you can find two groups dedicated to recording the scenes at the the Causeway Bay, Mong Kok, and Admiralty areas of Hong Kong. Urban Sketchers Hong Kong (USHK) and Sketcher-Kee have both been in existence for about a year, and have responded to the recent unrest with vigor. Its members have been posting sketches featuring unfriendly police, tense protesters, and poetically empty or chaotically crammed urban vistas dominated by umbrellas and the color yellow. 

At the moment the protests are in a bit of a lull, as protest leaders have met with government officials and agreed to meet for talks starting on October 10. Student leader Lester Shum has said that the protests would continue until “practical measures [have] been forged between the government and the people.”

USHK cofounder Alvin Wong emphasized to Hyperallergic‘s Laura C. Mallonee the value of documenting “the biggest pro-democracy protest in Hong Kong history,” no matter the risk. As Wong Suede of Sketcher-Kee says, “We want to use our ability to make awareness for the public, to share our observations, experiences, and thoughts via the Internet to the world. ... We hope we can support and encourage the protesters who are fighting for Hong Kong … since we are also protestors, we hope it may [achieve something] for the whole movement.”
 

Art by Rob Sketcherman
 

Art by Collins Yeung ART
 

Art by Wink Au
 
More after the jump…
 

Posted by Martin Schneider | Discussion
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‘Good Grief! Cancer Boy!’ Charlie Brown in nihilistic German existential cinema parody
10.08.2014
09:32 am

Topics:
Amusing
Art
Movies

Tags:
Peanuts
Charlie Brown
Apocalypse Pooh


 
You may remember a post last week on “Apocalypse Pooh,” a fantastic little pre-Internet mash-up of Apocalypse Now and Winnie The Pooh released in 1987 through underground tape-trading circles by art student Todd Graham. Though Graham is still best-known for his prototype mash-ups, I was pleased to find his fantastic little original short, “Good Grief! Cancer Boy!” a nihilistic portrayal of Charlie Brown in German (I mean, it’s more nihilistic than the original).

The disdain of his peers, the conniving sadism of Lucy, the general alienation of modern life, even in childhood—really, the material is already there. Todd Graham himself is brilliant as our tragic protagonist, and you can really feel the existential despair, you know?
 

Posted by Amber Frost | Discussion
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We are Narcissus: Artists create anti-selfie mirror
10.08.2014
09:16 am

Topics:
Amusing
Art

Tags:
narcissism
selfie


 
French artists Chloé Curé and Bertrand Lanthiez created a “mirror” effect with just water and speakers. It’s an interactive art project titled “We are Narcissus.” The longer a person stares into the mirror and gazes at their own reflection, the more their face gets distorted—leading the person “to question their relation to their own image.” (And making it damned near impossible to take the perfect selfie!)

I like this idea. I like its message. It works perfectly with the story of Narcissus, a vain hunter full of hubris and arrogance. Lured to a lake by Nemesis, the Greek goddess of revenge and divine retribution, Narcissus fell in love with his own reflection in the water, not realizing he was looking at himself. Unable to leave the beauty of his own reflection, Narcissus died there.

That’s hubris, baby.

So does this mean we’re all going to die if we keep taking photos of ourselves posing in front of mirrors? Surely you’ve heard the rumors that selfies contain carcinogens? Google it.

Watch the video below:

 
Via Booooooom!

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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iBeenHACKED
10.07.2014
04:57 pm

Topics:
Amusing
Art
Media
Music

Tags:
smartphones
Tim Fite


 
I’m one of those people—there are still a few of us left—who adamantly refuses to carry a cell phone. I had one in the late 90s for about a year, but I dropped it on a marble floor and didn’t replace it until 2007 during a period where I was traveling a lot. And that one is just a flip. It’s also never charged and I really have to hunt for it when I need it.

I simply don’t like the idea of anyone being able to reach me wherever I am. If I’m out in the world, or having lunch with someone or driving, I don’t want to take a phone call. My email can wait. I will not be texting anyone or Instagramming my selfies from the vegan food truck. All of it can wait until I get home.

I know it’s very… 1989 of me, but I honestly just don’t care. It’s not even that I am particularly anti-cell phones or anything, it’s that I personally do not require one.

Brooklyn-based art prankster/beatmeister Tim Fite is a man after my own heart. Realizing he had a “codependent” relationship with his smartphone he designed a glass iPhone replica called “The Phoney” to wean himself off the always on, constantly-updating datastream he was addicted to. Kind of like an e-cigarette that doesn’t have any nicotine. Or any battery for that matter.

Fite’s new project takes it further: iBeenHACKED is social commentary in the form of a musical concept album and art installation investigating the ways that the digital teet intrudes upon our daily lives and alters the way we live. The project includes a limited edition series of handmade glass “Phonies” and the taking over of a Brooklyn storefront that was turned into a giant smartphone and art studio, then gallery space. For the album, rather than try to sell CDs or downloads, Fite tried some alternative strategies to monetize his work such as the sale of advertising between songs and personal shout-outs. The songs lampoon online “liking” (“Like”), smartphone addiction (“Check Yo Cell”), the cult of Apple products (“Big Mac”), binge-watching (“4 Seasons”) and more.

If you like this post, please consider “liking” it…
 

 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Discussion
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Skinheads, 1979-1984
10.07.2014
07:51 am

Topics:
Art
History
Punk

Tags:
skinheads
Derek Ridgers


“Margate during a bank holiday, 1981.”
 
I can’t look at these poignant pictures of skinheads and punks in the U.K. around 1981 and not start humming “No Thugs in Our House” by XTC, which, as it happens, was recorded in late 1981.

You might imagine that the photographer, Derek Ridgers, was a compatriot of these young rebels, but that’s not the case. Ridgers had studied at the Ealing School of Art around 1970 (one of his fellow students there was one Farrokh Bulsara, a.k.a. Freddy Mercury), and in the 1970s Ridgers worked in advertising. In 1981 Ridgers turned 29 years old.

Says Ridgers of his becoming one of the first serious documenters of the skinhead scene: “It was pure beginner’s luck, helped by the photos being timely and available. And because of my advertising background, I had chutzpah and was fairly shameless in touting them around.”
 

In early ‘79 I was already engaged in what eventually turned out to be a lengthy photographic study of the New Romantics (though back then they were not known as such). I’d been documenting this nascent scene in the Soho nightclub ’Billy’s’ and, one evening, a group of about half-a-dozen skinheads turned up. They saw me taking photographs and one of them, a guy called Wally, asked me if I’d like to take some photos of them too. They seemed pretty friendly and not at all camera shy. I took a few snaps, we got talking and Wally suggested I go with the whole gang on one of their Bank Holiday jaunts to the seaside. That was what led, eventually, to five years of photographing skinheads. In those five years I got to know some of the skinheads quite well and liked many of them.

 
Interestingly, Ridgers was so not one of them that he almost entirely misjudged the identity of his subjects. “I must have been pretty daft. At first I assumed that Wally and his friends were just dressing up as skinheads. I thought that they’d probably all come from art schools or fashion colleges and they were benign, skinhead revivalists. … I proved to be seriously misinformed.”

Ridgers’ new book Skinheads was released in September. The captions are Ridgers’ own and come from this gallery at the Guardian website.
 

“I entitled this photograph ‘Smiler’ since he’s got it written on his jacket. His real name was Wayne and his street name was Wally. In an email he informed me that he was 16 when I took this photograph in 1984.”
 

“Kevin, photographed next to The Last Resort shop in Goulston Street, 1981. “
 

“Two skinhead girls photographed on a bank holiday in Brighton (this is the image later used by Morrissey on the Your Arsenal tour).”
 

“Kate, left, and Lesley, Shoreditch, 1979. “
 

“Skinheads hanging around outside The Last Resort shop in Goulston Street, 1981.”
 

“This is John and Dave (gleaned simply from looking at their tattoos) in Chelsea in 1981.”
 
More of Ridgers’ pictures of skinheads after the jump….

Posted by Martin Schneider | Discussion
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Get your Halloween on with this treasure trove of wild 1970s cosplay
10.06.2014
11:28 am

Topics:
Amusing
Art
Design
Fashion

Tags:
Halloween
Cosplay


 
I posted these photos a few years ago from io9 writer Ron Miller‘s insane 1970s cosplay-esque photo collection. They need to be revisited again. If not just for the disco dust-era eye candy, then to draw inspiration from these batshit galactic costumes for this upcoming Halloween.

Some have a slightly Kenneth Anger-ish feel to them. Well, Ken Anger meets Sonny & Cher meets Sun Ra meets a contingent of OTO members snorting coke at a Star Trek convention taking place at Studio 54 maybe…

You have your work cut out for you, folks! A good soundtrack for these would be Chic’s “Dance, Dance, Dance (Yowsa, Yowsa, Yowsa)” don’ you think?


 

 

 

 
More photos after the jump…
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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Russian nesting dolls of ‘Spinal Tap,’ ‘The Young Ones,’ ‘Rocky Horror,’ ‘Heathers’ and more
10.06.2014
08:01 am

Topics:
Art
Movies
Music
Pop Culture

Tags:
nesting dolls
Russian dolls

This is Spinal Tap nesting dolls
This is Spinal Tap
 
Australian artist Irene Hwang’s Etsy shop Bobobabushka is full Russian “Matryoshka” nesting dolls that bear the likeness of alt-cinema misfits from The Rocky Horror Picture Show, This is Spinal Tap, Ghost World, Heathers, cult BBC TV show The Young Ones and various troublemakers from the films of Wes Anderson and the Coen Brothers.

Hwang’s customers even harassed her into making a nesting doll based on the lower-than-low-budget 1966 cult film, Manos: The Hands of Fate and they are as excellent as Manos is horrible. A few of the cooler sets of Hwang’s hand-painted dolls ($120 - $190 a set) follow. 
 
The Rocky Horror Picture Show Russian nesting dolls
The Rocky Horror Picture Show
 
Ghost World Russian nesting dolls
Ghost World
 
Heathers Russian nesting dolls
Heathers
 
The Young Ones Russian nesting dolls
The Young Ones
 
The Big Lebowski Russian nesting dolls
The Big Lebowski
 
Manos: The Hands of Fate Russian nesting dolls
Manos: The Hands of Fate
 
Devo Russian nesting dolls
DEVO
 
Previously on Dangerous Minds:
Motörhead Russian Nesting Dolls

Posted by Cherrybomb | Discussion
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Graffiti artists reclaim the commons and obscure subway ads
10.06.2014
05:58 am

Topics:
Activism
Advertising
Art

Tags:
graffiti
NYC
subways


 
For what New Yorkers pay to ride “public transportation,” you’d think the MTA wouldn’t feel compelled to sell every square inch of subway car to bloodsucking corporate pirates—much less that aesthetic villain, Dr. Jonathan Zizmor. M.D.. But where there is a square inch to monetize, “public” space will never really be public. Two anonymous artists, going by SKI and 2ESAE, have decided to take the commons with some slick guerrilla tactics.

Now defacing ads is nothing new, and their messaging might be a little platitudinous (“be who you are don’t be sheep”), but the project itself is a kind of a cool ad campaign against ads. While the duo’s traditional idiom is graffiti, the plastering of polished “ad copy” is a subtler, more formal approach to anti-advertising protest—you have to look twice, something straphangers almost never do for a scrawl of Sharpie or an artless tag in spray paint. While very few people probably saw the installation itself (I’ve been on the J train at 3AM—it’s pretty dead), the folks at ANIMAL videotaped it for posterity—YouTube is the last town square, I suppose.

I’d hope actions like this might take off, but the MTA has already announced plans to put cameras in cars... you know… for safety.
 

 
Via ANIMAL

Posted by Amber Frost | Discussion
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Ghostly painted shadows in abandoned psychiatric hospital
10.03.2014
11:26 am

Topics:
Art

Tags:
Herbert Baglione


 
Behold the eerie work of Brazilian street artist Herbert Baglione. These ghostly shadows painted in an abandoned psychiatric hospital in Parma, Italy are a part of an ongoing project titled “1000 Shadows.”

Baglione’s work isn’t just limited to abandoned psychiatric hospitals (although I truly dig this idea), his painted silhouettes have shown up all over the world in deserted buildings, foreclosed homes and empty offices. His ghostly shadows tell the stories of the souls who once inhabited the now abandoned spaces. Locations that once had life.

You can follow Baglione’s “1000 Shadows” project on his Facebook page.


 

 

 
More after the jump…
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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