follow us in feedly
Get your Halloween on with this treasure trove of wild 1970s cosplay
10.06.2014
11:28 am

Topics:
Amusing
Art
Design
Fashion

Tags:
Halloween
Cosplay


 
I posted these photos a few years ago from io9 writer Ron Miller‘s insane 1970s cosplay-esque photo collection. They need to be revisited again. If not just for the disco dust-era eye candy, then to draw inspiration from these batshit galactic costumes for this upcoming Halloween.

Some have a slightly Kenneth Anger-ish feel to them. Well, Ken Anger meets Sonny & Cher meets Sun Ra meets a contingent of OTO members snorting coke at a Star Trek convention taking place at Studio 54 maybe…

You have your work cut out for you, folks! A good soundtrack for these would be Chic’s “Dance, Dance, Dance (Yowsa, Yowsa, Yowsa)” don’ you think?


 

 

 

 
More photos after the jump…
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
follow us in feedly
Russian nesting dolls of ‘Spinal Tap,’ ‘The Young Ones,’ ‘Rocky Horror,’ ‘Heathers’ and more
10.06.2014
08:01 am

Topics:
Art
Movies
Music
Pop Culture

Tags:
nesting dolls
Russian dolls

This is Spinal Tap nesting dolls
This is Spinal Tap
 
Australian artist Irene Hwang’s Etsy shop Bobobabushka is full Russian “Matryoshka” nesting dolls that bear the likeness of alt-cinema misfits from The Rocky Horror Picture Show, This is Spinal Tap, Ghost World, Heathers, cult BBC TV show The Young Ones and various troublemakers from the films of Wes Anderson and the Coen Brothers.

Hwang’s customers even harassed her into making a nesting doll based on the lower-than-low-budget 1966 cult film, Manos: The Hands of Fate and they are as excellent as Manos is horrible. A few of the cooler sets of Hwang’s hand-painted dolls ($120 - $190 a set) follow. 
 
The Rocky Horror Picture Show Russian nesting dolls
The Rocky Horror Picture Show
 
Ghost World Russian nesting dolls
Ghost World
 
Heathers Russian nesting dolls
Heathers
 
The Young Ones Russian nesting dolls
The Young Ones
 
The Big Lebowski Russian nesting dolls
The Big Lebowski
 
Manos: The Hands of Fate Russian nesting dolls
Manos: The Hands of Fate
 
Devo Russian nesting dolls
DEVO
 
Previously on Dangerous Minds:
Motörhead Russian Nesting Dolls

Posted by Cherrybomb | Discussion
follow us in feedly
Graffiti artists reclaim the commons and obscure subway ads
10.06.2014
05:58 am

Topics:
Activism
Advertising
Art

Tags:
graffiti
NYC
subways


 
For what New Yorkers pay to ride “public transportation,” you’d think the MTA wouldn’t feel compelled to sell every square inch of subway car to bloodsucking corporate pirates—much less that aesthetic villain, Dr. Jonathan Zizmor. M.D.. But where there is a square inch to monetize, “public” space will never really be public. Two anonymous artists, going by SKI and 2ESAE, have decided to take the commons with some slick guerrilla tactics.

Now defacing ads is nothing new, and their messaging might be a little platitudinous (“be who you are don’t be sheep”), but the project itself is a kind of a cool ad campaign against ads. While the duo’s traditional idiom is graffiti, the plastering of polished “ad copy” is a subtler, more formal approach to anti-advertising protest—you have to look twice, something straphangers almost never do for a scrawl of Sharpie or an artless tag in spray paint. While very few people probably saw the installation itself (I’ve been on the J train at 3AM—it’s pretty dead), the folks at ANIMAL videotaped it for posterity—YouTube is the last town square, I suppose.

I’d hope actions like this might take off, but the MTA has already announced plans to put cameras in cars... you know… for safety.
 

 
Via ANIMAL

Posted by Amber Frost | Discussion
follow us in feedly
Ghostly painted shadows in abandoned psychiatric hospital
10.03.2014
11:26 am

Topics:
Art

Tags:
Herbert Baglione


 
Behold the eerie work of Brazilian street artist Herbert Baglione. These ghostly shadows painted in an abandoned psychiatric hospital in Parma, Italy are a part of an ongoing project titled “1000 Shadows.”

Baglione’s work isn’t just limited to abandoned psychiatric hospitals (although I truly dig this idea), his painted silhouettes have shown up all over the world in deserted buildings, foreclosed homes and empty offices. His ghostly shadows tell the stories of the souls who once inhabited the now abandoned spaces. Locations that once had life.

You can follow Baglione’s “1000 Shadows” project on his Facebook page.


 

 

 
More after the jump…
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
follow us in feedly
‘Apocalypse Pooh’: The pre-Internet video mashup of Winnie the Pooh and ‘the horror’
10.02.2014
03:09 pm

Topics:
Art
Pop Culture

Tags:
Winnie the Pooh
Apocalypse Now


 
Think back on the era before the Internet—what savages we were! Ubiquitous genres of media like the mash-up were barely in their infancy and relegated almost entirely to the art world (aside from druggy pastimes like syncing up Wizard of Oz and The Dark Side of the Moon, the political détournée of René Viénet’s Situationist comedy Can Dialectics Break Bricks? or comedic dubs like What’s up, Tiger Lily?). Apocalypse Pooh, a surreal 1987 cut-and-paste of Apocalypse Now and Winnie The Pooh, was one of the first 100% recycled mash-ups, and was distributed almost completely through an ‘80s tape-trading underground.

Video artist (and former childhood TV addict) Todd Graham created Apocalypse Pooh in art school, and it was a mini-sensation among tape-traders. It rarely got much credit from the art world—a reception Graham attributed to the oh-so-serious world of video arts’ lack of humor (he also did a mash-up of The Archies doing “God Save the Queen), but today the video is considered groundbreaking. Apocalypse Pooh is as strange and funny as anything you’d find of its genre on the Internet now, and here it is, remastered in crystal clarity, so you can really see the napalmed Hundred Acre Wood!
 

Posted by Amber Frost | Discussion
follow us in feedly
Flowery guts make for lovely anatomical art
10.02.2014
07:28 am

Topics:
Art

Tags:
organs
flowers


uterus
 
Guatemalan-born artist Camila Carlow manages to depict organs in a floral, feminine light with “pretty” accurate depictions rendered in plant life. Her “Eye Heart Spleen” series (billed as “a tribute to nature’s invisible work”) is created entirely from materials she foraged. It’s quite a lovely tribute to our hardworking, rarely appreciated innards!

From her website:

The most fascinating and intricate of biological structures, yet we rarely pay heed to the organs inside our body. Regardless of whether we fill ourselves with toxins or nourishing food, whether we exercise or not - our organs sustain us, working away effortlessly and unnoticed.

In a similar way, plants flourishing in the urban environment are a testament to nature’s indifference to our goings on. They grow out of the sides of buildings, in brick walls and between the cracks in concrete, despite of the traffic and pollution.

You can buy Carlow’s prints on Etsy—maybe the perfect gift for that girly gastroenterologist you’re looking to woo? 
 

testicles
 

spleen
 

breast, note the inclusion of lymph nodes
 

pancreas
 

lungs
 

kidneys
 

heart
 

gut
 

Posted by Amber Frost | Discussion
follow us in feedly
We Are Gumbo! Pop culture soup can art featuring Devo, The Cramps, Divine & more
10.02.2014
07:14 am

Topics:
Art
Pop Culture

Tags:
Andy Warhol
The Cramps

The Cramps pop art soup cans by Zteven
The Cramps, Lux Interior and Poison Ivy
 
I’ve been an admirer of Atlanta-based pop artist Zteven for a while now and own many pieces from his pop culture-inspired soup can series (Lemmy Kilmister-flavored Bouillabaisse anyone?). In an interview earlier this year, Zteven cited the very moment his artistic inspiration was born after he saw Andy Warhol’s appearance on The Love Boat (which incidentally aired on October 12th of 1985 during season nine/episode three). The young Zteven was instantly mesmerized by Warhol’s “awkward coolness.” He developed an insatiable appetite for comic books, music and TV magazine, as well as the occasional tabloid while accompanying his grandmother to the beauty parlor.

Zteven is an 80’s kid to the core, and his artwork celebrates the many highlights of this glorious decade that often gets a worse rap than it deserves. Sail on over to Zteven’s Popmania! Etsy shop to see more.
 
Devo pop art soup can art by Zteven
Devo
 
Marc Bolan pop art soup cans by Zteven
Marc Bolan
 

‘Strangers with Candy’
 
Polyester pop art soup can by Zteven
Divine and Edith Massey
 

‘Pink Flamingos’ triptych
 

Tura Satana
 

Little Edie and Big Edie from ‘Grey Gardens’
 

David Bowie

Posted by Cherrybomb | Discussion
follow us in feedly
Massive mural pays homage to cult film ‘Heavy Metal Parking Lot’
09.30.2014
11:14 am

Topics:
Art
Movies

Tags:
Jeff Krulik

Heavy Metal Parking Lot mural by Jasper Patch
 
New York City based artist Jasper Patch was invited to hand-paint this 8’ x 70’ mural on a wall outside of a bar called Clyde’s in Chattanooga,Tennessee. The owners of Clyde’s left the subject matter up to Patch and he chose wisely, as the mural features several of the most memorable stars of director Jeff Krulik’s 1986 cult documentary “Heavy Metal Parking Lot.”

The mural took Patch about ten days to paint and according to the artist himself the response has been as big as his painting. In my estimation, the only thing this metal monstrosity is missing is an image of the long-haired acid tripper from HMPL, the forever shirtless Graham (“you know, like, gram of dope n’ shit?”). Here are a few close-ups of the mural.
 
Heavy Metal Parking Lot mural braces girl
 
Heavy Metal Parking Lot mural Zebraman
 
If you’ve ever wondered what happened to the drunken kids of “Heavy Metal Parking Lot,” I have good news. In 2006, Jeff Krulik and his partner in crime John Heyn tracked down some of the film’s alumni to see what they’ve been up to. To the surprise of nobody they are all still headbanging devotees. They even found “Zebraman” (pictured above), an unwitting fan favorite of the flick who despite his acid-soaked proclamations about Mars, is improbably still alive.

“PRIEST IS THE BEST!”
 

 
Previously featured on Dangerous Minds:
‘Heavy Metal Parking Lot’ trading cards

Posted by Cherrybomb | Discussion
follow us in feedly
Stevie Nicks’ selfies from the 1970s
09.30.2014
09:05 am

Topics:
Art
Music
Pop Culture

Tags:
Stevie Nicks
Fleetwood Mac


 
Never-before-seen—until now, naturally—Stevie Nicks self-portraits from the mid-1970s. There are a lot wickedly cool Nicks selfies in this collection—all of which were shot with a Polaroid camera.

(Eat your heart out Kardashian clan! Your selfies got nothin’ on Stevie!)

Some people don’t sleep at night - I am one of those people. These pictures were taken long after everyone had gone to bed - I would begin after midnight and go until 4 or 5 in the morning. I stopped at sunrise - like a vampire… I never really thought anyone would ever see these pictures, they went into shoeboxes, where they remained. I did everything - I was the stylist, the makeup artist, the furniture mover, the lighting director. It was my joy - I was the model…

Leaving aside the matter of what was keeping Ms. Nicks awake in the 70s, the Morrison Hotel Gallery is doing an exhibition of her photos in Los Angeles and New York City. You can buy prints online if any image strikes your fancy.
 

 

 

 
A few more images after the jump…
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
follow us in feedly
U.S. money redesigned with contemporary icons
09.30.2014
07:36 am

Topics:
Amusing
Art
Heroes

Tags:
money


 
Ah, wouldn’t it be wonderful if Iggy Pop were on the five-dollar bill? Or if Warhol were on the ten? I used to live in Austria, and back in the pre-Euro days, when they still had the Schilling, their banknotes had Erwin Schrödinger and Sigmund Freud on them—not bad. Belgium used to have Magritte on its 500-franc note. France put Antoine de Saint-Exupéry on one of their bills. James Joyce at one time was on Ireland’s ten-pound note.

How long before Iceland puts Björk on a bill? 

It’s difficult to look at these defaced U.S. banknotes, part of James Charles’ “American Iconomics” series, and not think of J. S. G. Boggs but Charles’ satires are less totalistic in their intent—closer to Mad Magazine, say.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
via Ufunk

Posted by Martin Schneider | Discussion
follow us in feedly
Page 4 of 220 ‹ First  < 2 3 4 5 6 >  Last ›