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If you have an extra $500,000, here’s a gold skull armchair to buy
01.12.2016
10:10 am

Topics:
Art
Design

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A 24-karat gold skull armchair for that special supervillain in your life. I can’t imagine too many people will be buying this as it’s retailing for $500,000. Holy crap, Batman!

The company who makes it is called Harow. Here’s their information just in case, you know, you can afford it.

Dig the black velvet upholstery.


 
More after the jump…
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Sex, death & fishnets in the surreal film ‘Satan bouche un coin’ (NSFW)
01.12.2016
09:53 am

Topics:
Art
Movies
Occult
Sex

Tags:

00bouche0.jpg
 
Paris 1968: While students riot on the streets and fight pitched battles with the police, journalist, filmmaker and writer Jean-Pierre Bouyxou was making an improvised short film—Satan bouche un coin—in collaboration with Raphael Marongiu and a group of their friends. It was a bit of fun—a surrealist home movie for their own entertainment, to be watched over a bottle of wine and a joint or two.

The pair had filmed in Bordeaux, Paris and Belgium and had even enlisted the involvement of the infamous fetishistic artist Pierre Molinier to perform in front of the camera.

The 68-year-old Molinier was a member of the surrealists, who had gained considered notoriety for his artworks and through the stories of his scandalous personal life—for example he once admitted to masturbating over the corpse of his sister. More recently, Molinier had started a highly personal and explicit photographic investigation into his auto-erotic transvestite and transsexual fantasies.
 
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Pierre Molinier.
 
In Satan bouche un coin Molinier appears as Androgyne. Bouyxou filmed one of Molinier’s auto-erotic performance pieces, which he used as the opening sequence to his film. Bouyxou’s intention was to put together a series of short unconnected sequences—or as he called them “stories”—editing them into a series of rhythmic patterns dictated by the music—Camille Saint-Saëns Danse macabre.
 
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While owing much to the work of Kenneth Anger, Bouyxou does invest Satan bouche un coin with some devilish charm and a little humor.

Bouyxou—who celebrates his 70th birthday this week—went on to become an actor and screenwriter, and making movies with such legendary filmmakers as Jean Rollin and Jesus Franco. 

Satan bouche un coin is a mesmerizing twelve minutes—one to watch before it’s pulled.
 

 
Previously on Dangerous Minds
The auto-erotic art of Pierre Molinier
 
Thanks to Brian Beadie!
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Artist illustrates what it’s like to live with anxiety and depression
01.12.2016
09:20 am

Topics:
Art

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If you don’t live with anxiety and/or depression (or know someone who does), these illustrations will probably not mean a lot to you. If you, like me, do suffer from one or both, then these illustrations will hit close to home. The wording and situations nail it, IMO.

Artist Gemma Correll sums up—with some humor—what it’s like to suffer from these sometimes debilitating medical disorders.

“I honestly think that humor can be a saviour at times of distress or, if you just live with a constant level of anxiety and depression like I do,” said Correll. “I do think that people should speak more freely about anxiety,” she added. “I know that I would have felt a little better as an anxiety-ridden teenager if I knew that I wasn’t completely alone in my fears.”

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More after the jump…
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
‘She asked for my love and I gave her a dangerous mind’: Goodbye David Bowie from Dangerous Minds
01.11.2016
03:58 pm

Topics:
Art
Heroes
Music
R.I.P.

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David Bowie playing at Rodney Bingenheimer’s club in Los Angeles, 1970. Courtesy of Getty Images. Buy a print of this photograph at Photos.com.

As—ahem—some of our readers may have noticed over the years, the late David Bowie has always been our patron saint here at Dangerous Minds. You might say he was our spirit animal. Below, three of our writers pay tribute to the Thin White Duke and contemplate a world without David Bowie in it…

***

Christopher Bickel: Let’s be honest. At Dangerous Minds there are certain subjects that we have covered rather extensively. We’ve taken our share of good-natured ribbing over that fact that we jock Bowie hard and often. It goes without saying that the writers here are going to have something to say on this day when we celebrate the career and legacy of one of the true giants of the rock and roll era.

No celebrity death has emotionally affected me to this degree. We haven’t had a musician pass who was so universally loved for their talent and influence since the assassination of John Lennon. Michael Jackson, maybe, but his legacy was so tainted by the time of his death. Bowie’s life and artistic output remained inspiring up until the very end. Last November when the video for “Blackstar” dropped, I remarked that it was a “masterpiece.” Little did I know, then, that it was Bowie’s “parting gift” to us all. Certainly he knew.

I loved Bowie from the first time I heard him—which was “Rebel Rebel” on the radio. But as a kid, I thought the words I was hearing were “Grandma, Grandma—who tore your dress?” I remember at the time thinking “it’s really rude of this singer to call his grandmother a ‘tramp’”—but also kind of cool. I was wrong about the words I was hearing, but I wasn’t wrong about loving the music.  The man never put out a bad record. Sure, there’s varying degrees of quality in his catalog, but I challenge anyone to name a single Bowie record that “flat out sucks.” You can’t.

It’s hard to pin down a favorite. I called it as Low for years, but I’ve eventually settled on Scary Monsters as my top pick. New Wave Bowie is my guy. Bowie knew how to pick a backing band, and Fripp just kills it on that record. Reeves Gabrels later picked up that torch and THIS VIDEO from 2006 of “Scary Monsters” is absolutely scorching—and is as good as any Bowie performance from any point in his career. That’s the thing: Bowie remained relevant and exciting as both a writer and performer all the way until the very end. There will never be another. 

***
 

 
Martin Schneider: What is there to say? One mark of an artist’s power is a general inability on the audience’s part to imagine our world in their absence; we’re all experiencing that weird pang right now, big time. No rock star was more forward-looking or incorporated so many different cultural streams; it shouldn’t be surprising that his influence and resonance have only increased over the years. He was a cultural vampire, in the best sense; he took from everybody and he never aged.

As a teen, I found Bowie incredibly intriguing but also a bit chilly (Pink Floyd was easier); it took me a long time to warm up to him. Of course I did, finally—he’s inescapable, after all. As I get older he strikes me as the very best, the most mature and the most complex, that a rock star can realistically be.

So long, Star Man.

***
 

 
Richard Metzger: I first heard of David Bowie when I very first started listening to pop music. My interest in Bowie was probably what got me interested in music to begin with. I was eight and it was early 1974. A local AM radio station played “Space Oddity” at 11pm one night and I happened to be be up late listening and had my young mind totally blown into a million pieces. That song entered my consciousness and exploded there, rearranging my outlook on the world like nothing had before and like nothing has ever since, I can promise you. It was, for me personally, probably the Ur-epiphany of my entire life. But I didn’t catch the name of the singer or the song. The next night, at the exactly same time, the DJ played it again, and then the following night he spun it again. This time I was ready. I taped it with my $30 Sears cassette recorder, the mic held up to the clock radio’s speaker. Soon afterwards I had the 45rpm record and soon after that—a matter of just days—I had the ultra-heavy single only version of “Rebel, Rebel” (a record cut so loud that it threatened to blow out your speakers, as anyone reading this who owned it can attest to). My parents were okay with buying me a 99 cent single from time to time, but an LP (which might’ve cost about $4.98 then) was out of the question and I needed to have everything David Bowie-related. Immediately if not sooner.

So I did yard work and gardening around the neighborhood—weed-pulling to be exact, I was too young for pushing a lawn mower around—to be able to afford first Diamond Dogs, then in fairly rapid succession Aladdin Sane, Pin-Ups, The Man Who Sold the Word, David Live, Young Americans, etc. (Oddly enough, it would be Ziggy Stardust that I acquired last and it remains my least favorite of the pre-ChangesOneBowie catalog.)

And then I saw that they were repeating “The 1980 Floor Show” on The Midnight Special. I don’t think I was ever the same again after I saw that. It was a powerful and visceral lesson in… well… something. I was too young to know exactly what it all meant, but I did know intrinsically what he—David Bowie as an iconic entity—meant. Bowie-fandom was closer to a religion than a hobby. It was a revelation, you might say.

I would scour the TV Guide hoping for a Bowie-sighting and—in lieu of a VCR—I’d tape the audio on my cassette recorder whenever he appeared on things like Soul Train, Dinah!, Cher and the Grammy Awards telecast. I listened to them so many times that 35 years later I would see them again on YouTube and I’d know each and every word. On Dinah! he invited Dr. Thelma Moss on as one of his hand-picked guests, a UCLA professor who was known for investigating the science of Kirlian photography. This was in 1976 and I would have been, at that point ten and in the 5th grade. My Bowie-fanaticism was so ingrained in me by then that I built a rudimentary Kirlian photography device after finding plans for it on microfilm in the local library!
 

 
I wrote about this in 2010, on the occasion of the publication of the coffee table book Bowie: Object.

To give you a personal (and very small) example of the multitude of ways David Bowie has influenced little old me, when I was ten years old and Bowie was the guest on Dinah Shore’s afternoon talk/variety show, he was able to invite Dr. Moss on as a guest as well. Moss demonstrated the ability of the Kirlian device—a high voltage electric field “camera”—to basically take snapshots of plant and human “auras.” Because Bowie was fascinated by this wild new science of Kirlian photography, then, hey, so was I and—this is true—I built a homemade version of the Kirlian Photographic device for a grade-school science fair.

It was made with a battery, a wood base, some wire, a metal plate and used 2” by 2” film, which was placed under the plate, and sent a jolt via the battery to expose the film. Now, granted, at that age, I wasn’t testing the “before and after” side-effects of snorting cocaine on my aura (see above) like Bowie was—-I used leaves and my thumbprint—but still, you can see clearly in this stupid example of how I, a little kid at the time, saw David Bowie as this like, larger than life cultural avatar of the newest and coolest things around.

Beyond influencing my 5th grade science fair entry, I’m pretty sure that it was David Bowie that led me directly to my interests in Andy Warhol, Iggy, Lou Reed, the Velvets, George Orwell, and even William Burroughs. My interest in most things artistic and countercultural probably began with David Bowie when I was a kid and simply fanned out from there. I honestly don’t think I would be the same person today, or would have lived the life that I have or that I would even be doing what I do professionally without his influence on not only what I was thinking or feeding my head with when I was very young, but also on the way his life and art demonstrated what was possible to aspire to.

Twelve years ago, when someone working the register at St. Mark’s Books told me that David Bowie had purchased my Disinformation book and DVD—David Bowie knew who I was???—it was one of the proudest moments of my entire life. I simply can’t believe he’s gone.

Below, David Bowie and the Spiders from Mars on the ‘Ziggy’ tour in Dunstable, June 21, 1972 doing “Song for Bob Dylan”:

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Photos from the early days of Jamaican dancehall
01.11.2016
12:12 pm

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Art
Music

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Daddy Shark, 1986
 
A native of Toronto, photographer Beth Lesser encountered reggae in the late 1970s and fell for the music so hard that she simply had to go to Jamaica and document the vibrant goings-on for herself. In 1980 she and her partner David Kingston started a fanzine named “Live Good Today” (after a song by Prince Jazzbo) for Augustus Pablo’s organization Rockers International. When Pablo generously suggested they include other artists, Beth and Dave published the first edition of Reggae Quarterly, which also soon began to cover the budding dancehall scene.

In 1986 she married Kingston at “a Youth Promotion dance at Sugar Minott’s house.” Lesser’s fabulous documents of this invigorating era have also been collected in her 2008 book Dancehall: The Story of Jamaican Dancehall Culture.

You can see these pictures and many more at London’s KK Outlet until January 30.
 

Outside King Jammy’s studio in Kingston
 

Papa Screw, who was the selector for Black Scorpio sound
 

Artists and crew members hang around by a sign instructing people not to idle, outside Jammy’s studio
 
Many more great pics after the jump…

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Anton LaVey’s drawing of a typical ‘70s male is pretty funny
01.11.2016
10:45 am

Topics:
Art
Occult

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Several drawings attributed to The Satanic Bible’s notorious author Anton LaVey, dating from the late ‘60s and early 1970s, have turned up on eBay. As provenance goes, they’re purportedly from the collection of the late iconoclast’s namesake grandson, Stanton LaVey, a controversial figure himself—but none of the works are signed. That, or the perhaps high-ish opening bid requests could be why they’ve not attracted any action thus far—$666 is a fittingly cheeky asking price, but arguably a bit much for a 3.5” doodle, even one by so infamous a figure. And that’s the lowest price point for any of these items.

None of the works offered are what you’d call finished drawings, which is fair enough, art isn’t what the man was known for. Some are simply doodle pages, but the most interesting pieces are the more fully realized:
 

 

 

 

 
The best piece of all, though, is LaVey’s annotated caricature of the typical ‘70s male, a witty sketch that sums up LaVey’s famous contempt for normalcy and trend-obeisance.
 

 

 

 

 
After the jump, incredible footage of LaVey from—I shit you not—an ACTUAL CHILDREN’S TV SHOW in the 1960s…

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Leave a comment
Paper artist creates wonderfully intricate paper costumes
01.11.2016
10:27 am

Topics:
Art
Fashion

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By now we’ve all seen some pretty remarkable paper costumes thanks to the Internet. But I must admit, I’ve never laid my eyes on anything quite like this before: beautifully detailed, wedding-themed paper costumes. Russian artist Asya Kozina designed and constructed these gorgeous pieces for the undergarment company Wild Orchid Lingerie. I can’t stop marveling over them. I just can’t.

I worked with this recalcitrant medium back in my art school days, and let me tell you this… it ain’t easy. It’s painstaking work to get the paper to fold and curve just right.

Kudos to Kozina for such jaw-dropping, perfectly-designed pieces.


 

 

 

 
More after the jump…
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Man turns his decades-worth of fingernail clippings into paperweights
01.07.2016
10:18 am

Topics:
Amusing
Art
Unorthodox

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I’m sorta speechless with this one. Not gonna lie. 

Anyway, 45-year-old Queens resident Mike Drake collects his fingernail and toenail clippings and turns them into acrylic paperweights which sell for $300 - $500 a pop. It’s called ART, dammit. Try not to be so judgmental.

“I used to bite my nails, and I wondered how long they could grow. And then I wondered how much I might be able to accumulate.”

So he collected his nail clippings in a Ziploc baggie for about a year, and was about to throw them out when inspiration struck. He decided to do something ‘artistic’ with them.

“I realised I went to all that effort, and I figured, in for a penny, in for a pound. I already worked with acrylics as a hobby so I decided to make paperweights.”

Makes sense.

Drake only makes one paperweight weight per year using a greenish-acrylic tint because the jade color “gives off an emerald quality.”

The more you know.


 

 
via WOW and Huffington Post

 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Apocalypse Then: Monsters, nightmares & portents from ‘Augsburg Book of Miraculous Signs’
01.05.2016
10:56 am

Topics:
Art
Belief
Books
Kooks

Tags:

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When Oliver Sacks was starting out on his career in neurology, he noted that many of his colleagues never seemed to read or make reference to any scientific papers more than five years old. Sacks found this strange, for as a teenager in England he had devoured numerous books on the history of chemistry and biology and even botany. However, to his fellow neurologists Sacks’ interest in the “historical and human dimension” of science was considered “archaic.” Undeterred, Sacks was convinced the historical narrative offered a better understanding of scientific investigation.

This became evident with his diagnosis of a patient who suffered incessant jerking movements of the head and limbs. With his knowledge of previous scientific investigations, Sacks was able to correctly identify the cause of the patient’s illness while at the same time confirm a theory put forward by two German pathologists—Hallervorden and Spatz—in 1922, which had almost been forgotten. This only further convinced Sacks of the great insights to be gleaned from having some historical understanding of science.

Something similar is going on here in the phantasmagorical Augsburg Book of Miraculous Signs from 1552—which presents a continuous religious narrative from Biblical stories through historical events, and assumed portents and signs right up to the 16th century—the era when Protestantism became the dominant Christian religion in England, Scotland, Germany and Switzerland.

Privately commissioned in the German town of Augsburg, this “miracle” book was published in “123 folios with 23 inserts, each page fully illuminated, one astonishing, delicious, supersaturated picture follows another.” While church reformers such as Martin Luther and John Calvin denounced Catholicism for its superstitious and idolatrous beliefs, the Augsburg Book of Miraculous Signs served to remind its Protestant readers of the hand of God working thru various strange and ominous events—earthquakes, plagues of locusts, weird beasts, monstrous births and unusual solar activity. Like many of his fellow reformers, Luther believed such portents signified The End of Days and the coming Apocalypse—a trope that continues to this day. 

But for the modern secular reader, these beautiful water colors and gouaches describe meteorological events—floods, hailstones, storms; seismic activity—the Lisbon earthquake; solar activity; and the cyclical path of comets; all of which—as Oliver Sacks understood—can give science its human and historical dimension.

M’colleague, Martin Schneider previously posted on this wondrous book, stating he wished he was able to read the descriptions accompanying the images. Well, this where possible I have now done or have described the scene illustrated. For those who would like to own their own copy, a facsimile edition of the Augsburg Book of Miraculous Signs has been published by Taschen and is available here.
 
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The great flood—in the center what maybe a representation of Noah’s ark.
 
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The destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah.
 
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Moses parts the Red Sea.
 
More ‘divine’ revelation, after the jump….

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Your new favorite 19th-century naughty erotic typeface (NSFW)
01.04.2016
11:40 am

Topics:
Art
Design
Sex

Tags:


 
I couldn’t find much about 19th century German artist Heinrich Lossow’s “smutty” alaphabet. In fact, I could only find one single online source that had all of Lossow’s dirty typeface together on one page. Perhaps there’s a reason why: these illustrations are also credited to a French artist namedJoseph Apoux. According to Apoux’s brief Wikipedia page, the series is called Erotic Alphabet and date back to 1880.

Heinrich Lossow (1843-1897) was known for his Rococo-style paintings and pushing the envelope when it came to inserting pornographic details into his paintings. The most notable one being The Sin, circa 1880. French artist Joseph Apoux had the same reputation as Lossow.

In the end, I’m going with Joseph Apoux as the one responsible. There’s slightly more information pointing towards him concerning these naughty letters.


 

 

 
More after the jump…
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
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