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R. Crumb illustrates incest, murder & other sordid situations from the ‘Book of Genesis’ (NSFW)
08.09.2016
12:18 pm

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It was hard to draw God. Should God just be a bright light? Should I use word balloons? Should God be a woman?

—R. Crumb on his 2009 illustrated version of the “Book of Genesis”

According to seminal underground comic book artist and illustrator of gargantuan women Robert Crumb, his unique artistic style was the product of good old LSD. Prior to taking his first trip in 1965 Crumb was newly married to his soon-to-be ex-wife Dana Morgan and unhappily employed as a greeting card illustrator. As drugs were still legal at the time, Crumb decided to drop acid one weekend and by the time the workweek arrived on Monday his entire perspective on pretty much everything (including his art) had changed for the better.
 

R. Crumb on ACID.
 
We have so many illustrated oddities to thank Crumb and his pal LSD for from Zap Comix, Mr. Natural and the weirdos within the pages of Crumb’s long-running Weirdo. And if anyone could possibly make anything related to one of the greatest works of fiction otherwise known as The Bible more interesting it’s Mr. Crumb. Which is exactly what Crumb did back in 2009 when he published his own 200+ page illustrated take on all 50 chapters that make up Genesis, The Book of Genesis Illustrated by R. Crumb. Though not a fan of organized religion himself, Crumb’s take on Genesis was brutally faithful to its ancient predecessor and is full of comic-styled depictions of sex, murder and debauchery that so displeased “God” that he decided to wipe out his creations in a flood.

Much like the disclaimer on the book’s cover Crumb truly left “nothing out” of his adaptation of Genesis—which likely riled up religious types when they saw passages from the first book of the Old Testament detailing incestual situations illustrated by the sex-obsessed cartoonist. But I’m not one of those types so I wholehearted endorse Crumb’s herculean effort. If this R. Crumb artifact if missing from your collection, you can get a copy here.

Images from The Book of Genesis Illustrated by R. Crumb follow and as you might imagine are NSFW.
 

 

 
More after the jump…

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Brutally honest cartoons capture the harsh reality of the stripping life (NSFW)
08.08.2016
09:10 am

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The Beaver Show is a collection of raunchy, funny, and honest cartoons by Jacqueline Frances. It’s a memoir of sorts that focuses on one of the most sexualized workplaces a woman can have—the strip club. As “Jacq” says, her job is to dance, naked, “for large (and occasionally insultingly modest) sums of money.” As a result, many of her work relationships are measured in minutes, and her closest confidantes are the other women doing the stripping.
 

 
In addition to entertaining and amusing, the book is a kind of all-purpose introduction and “how-to” for the stripping life, it supplies an education for women who might want to become strippers, and it powerfully serves to correct the behavior of the male clients that pay Jacq’s rent. Here are some of the useful things you’ll learn about what it’s like to be a stripper if you read The Beaver Show:
 

When you interact with strippers, they’re working. That means their main concern is getting paid. So pay them.

You might be looking for some kind of personal connection at the strip club, but they probably aren’t.

A “hot” client is probably a bit of a jerk and probably smells awful. If you want to impress a stripper, take a shower.

You’re probably not the first to wonder how they ended up doing this, so don’t ask.

Believe it or not, strippers are people, and they dislike it when you objectify them.

 
The Beaver Show appears to be a self-published project; I have nothing but admiration for “Jacq the Stripper” (as she signs her strips) for her determination in bypassing the regular publishing gatekeepers and getting her cartoons out there, come what may.

This is a raw and honest depiction of an arena that is in many ways governed by lust and power and sometimes greed. It’s a decidedly female perspective, and it can’t be surprising that the male animal doesn’t come off looking very good.

You can buy the book on Amazon or at select bookstores in Montreal, New York, and Baltimore. The price of the book is $19.99, a.k.a. “the price of a lapdance,” as she puts it.

You can see more single-panel cartoons like these at her website.
 

 
Much more after the jump…....

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Lemmy Kilmister homaged with sick new custom Motörhead ‘Warpig’ bass
08.08.2016
08:51 am

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Custom ‘Lemmy Bass’ by Cynosure Guitars.
 
Set to make their debut to the word at massive UK heavy metal festival Bloodstock are two new custom bass guitars that were created to memorialize the forever frontman of Motörhead, Lemmy Kilmister.

Paul Raymond Gregory the man behind Bloodstock commissioned Cynosure Guitars to make two different Lemmy inspired basses—“The Lemmy Bass” with a body carved in Wenge wood (found in Central Africa) in the image of Motörhead’s famous “Warpig” (also known as “Snaggletooth” complete with a nose ring and Zebra wood eyes that function as volume controls) and a more classic bass with touches inspired by Lemmy’s love of German WWII military artifacts.

In addition to getting an eyeful of both incredible bass guitars the bar at Bloodstock has been renamed “Lemmy’s Bar” in honor of the rebellious Kilmister who as we all know had a nearly life-long relationship with booze—specifically his beloved Jack and Coke. While I know many of our readers are big Motörhead fans and are probably saying out loud “shut up and take my money!” both fully-functional basses are at this time one-offs and do not appear to be for sale. Yet.
 

 
More after the jump…

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Doctor Who reimagined as Penguin Books
08.08.2016
08:50 am

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Well this is nice. The world’s longest-running science-fiction series Doctor Who reimagined as retro Penguin books from the 1960s-1980s.

I do like Penguin books. They are the acme of paperback fiction. And while I may have an apartment already crammed wall to wall and floor to ceiling with way too many books, I know I could just about find enough space for a few of these.

The covers are designed by Sean Coleman at notebooks from Coleman Designs. A small selection of these vintage designs are available to buy as notebooks.

While there are literally dozens of real Doctor Who novelizations—some even published by Penguin—none are quite as stylish or as desirable as these beauties. Check out more Doctor Who book designs here.
 
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More classic Penguin-style designs, after the jump…

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Troublemaking toddlers harass half-naked pin-up girls in vintage French magazine ‘Paris Tabou’
08.05.2016
11:50 am

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The cover of the October 1951 issue of ‘Paris Tabou.’
 
Cheeky French magazine Paris Tabou (named for the famed Parisian nightclub “Le Tabou” once located on Rue Dauphine in St. Germain des Prés) was a French monthly pin-up magazine that made its debut in September of 1949. What I found rather curious about the gorgeous covers that featured illustrations of nearly nude women (most by Italian artist Gino Boccasile) was the inclusion of various mischievous toddlers with rather bad intentions.

Though Paris Tabou stopped publishing in 1953 it definitely made its mark with the help of Boccasile’s intriguingly perverse covers. Boccasile himself has an interesting history—the artist had only one functional eye, but was fairly prolific during the 1930s. His work graced the covers of many French magazines and books. Though his ability to produce beautiful renderings of women in various stages of undress can’t be disputed, the illustrator also had a darker side.

A supporter of fascist dictator Benito Mussolini, Boccasile’s hateful “anti-negro” posters (which I won’t include in this post for obvious reasons—Google them if you really must) were used as propaganda by Mussolini in the 1940s during the onset of the RSI (the “Repubblica Sociale Italiana” or “Italian Social Republic”) that was formed by Mussolini in order to maintain control of Italy (with the assistance of the German military). Boccasile was later tried (and acquitted) for his “artistic” contributions to the Third Reich. Yikes. Soon after his acquittal Boccasile switched gears and began creating memorable images that were used to advertise everything from makeup to booze. His illustrated covers for Paris Tabou were some of the last works he created before he died in 1952 at the age of 51. Many of the images that follow are slightly NSFW.
 

July, 1950.
 

June, 1950.
 
More after the jump…

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‘Wunderkammer’: A new exhibition of Clive Barker’s weird and disturbing paintings
08.05.2016
09:55 am

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‘Death’s Womb.’
 
A new exhibition of artwork by writer, artist and filmmaker Clive Barker opens at the Copro Gallery in Santa Monica this month.

Entitled Wunderkammer the show brings together Barker’s more recent oil paintings depicting the “unseen world of fantasy co-existing with our own reality.” Wunderkammer means “a place where a collection of curiosities and rarities is exhibited.”

Barker is of course best known for his superlative work as a writer and producer of fantasy-horror fiction and film. His novels include The Hellbound Heart, Weaveworld, Imajica, Abarat and The Scarlet Gospels.  While as producer or director he has made the movies Hellraiser, Nightbreed, Candyman and Lord of Illusion.

Barker divides his day between writing, filmmaking and painting. The painting he usually does in the evening around seven when he dons his “painting clothes” and goes into his studio. His artwork has been exhibited across the world and included in books and magazines.

Wunderkammer opens at the Copro on August 6th-27th. All of the paintings are for sale—details here.
 
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‘Demons of Night and Day.’
 
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‘3 Beasts Devouring Each Other.’
 
More of Clive Barker’s paintings after the jump…

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Unsettling sculptures of the Torrance family from ‘The Shining’ that you can never unsee
08.04.2016
09:20 am

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Danny, Wendy and Jack Torrance sculptures.
 
Sculptor and artist Clair Monaghan says that she enjoys building and animating characters that tell a “story.” In this case Monaghan managed to scare the shit out of me by re-telling Stanley Kubrick’s 1980’s adaptation of Stephen King’s 1977 novel The Shining by creating three sculptures based on Danny, Wendy and Jack Torrance. I feel compelled to warn you that Monaghan’s bizarre sculptures cannot be unseen, much like the film itself.
 

An image of the jacked-up teeth in the mouth of Wendy Torrance sculpture
 
I’m especially freaked out by the jacked-up looking teeth protruding from Shelley Duvall’s clay face (see above). The sculptured choppers sent me scurrying to look at photos of Miss Duvall to see if in fact her actual teeth were that askew. While they are not perfect they are definitely not of the full-on hillbilly back-room dentistry variety that Monaghan created. Sadly Monaghan hasn’t updated her blog or website since 2012 and at that time it did not appear as though she was interesting in selling any of her clay Torrances. Which leaves us to revel in her curiously weird sculptures of three of cinema’s most famous faces frozen in time—just like Jack. 
 

 

Jack and Wendy Torrance together forever!
 
More after the jump…

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DIY models kits (apparently) of Lou Reed, Frank Zappa, ‘Diamond Dog’ Bowie, Marc Bolan & more
08.03.2016
12:32 pm

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Now who does this rock ‘n’ roll animal resin kit look like to you?
 
Monsters in Motion, the self-described “one-stop monster shop” based in Placentia, California sells many strange things. Things like a replica of the bloody shirt that Bruce Willis’ character wore in Pulp Fiction. There’s so much strange ephemera to sift through on their website that I decided to go directly for the “Rock & Roll Collectables” category to see what kind of weirdness was being offered up there.

If you came into this world at a certain time period you remember building models of hot rods because that was where it was at. While you won’t find a kit that helps you build a 1969 Ford Mustang Mach 1 (my vintage getaway car of choice) you will find several DIY kits that allow you to create your own tiny versions of (allegededly) Lou Reed, Keith Richards, Mick Jagger-there’s even a resin facsimile of David Bowie as rendered by artist Guy Peellaert on the cover of his 1974 album Diamond Dogs.

The images are a bit tatty, but see if you can make out who they’re supposed to be.
 

 

The Lizard King
 
More after the jump…

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‘LET ME DIE IN DRAG!’: The sleazy pulp paperbacks of ‘Plan 9 from Outer Space’ director Ed Wood
08.03.2016
09:07 am

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During the 1960s, several years after he’d begun making himself infamous as one of the greatest terrible auteurs in the history of cinema, Edward D. Wood Jr. moonlit as the author of lurid pulp novels, many about gay men, which he wasn’t, and cross-dressers, which he rather famously was, with a fixation on angora so powerful it made its way into his film Glen or Glenda. (That last detail is actually Ed Wood 101 stuff, and if you haven’t seen the wonderful Tim Burton biopic about him, by all means, you should—the direction and performances are superb. If you’re more the bookish type, I’d suggest reading Nightmare of Ecstasy.)

Per SIN-A-RAMA, Feral House’s excellent survey of trashy sex novels (my DM colleague Chris Bickel told you all about it not long ago), Wood wrote not just under his own name, but under at least eight pseudonyms, and according to the outstanding 2011 exhibition catalog Ed Wood’s Sleaze Paperbacks, there were more than that—they list a few books as Wood’s that are credited to I shit you not Norman Bates.

This points to a big problem in identifying Wood’s work. Some pulp pseudonyms were shared by more than one author, and the possibility exists that some books attributed to Wood were falsely credited by unscrupulous vintage resellers seeking to increase their sale price. It seems odd that Wood used pseudonyms at all—he relished in being credited under his own name, and since many of his more scandalous pulps were published under his given name, it’s hard to imagine that the tamer stuff could serve as a blow to his reputation!

If you’d care to actually read this stuff, brace yourself for collector pricing—an asking price of $200 is on the low end for some of these. A few of them have been reprinted, though, and the collection Blood Splatters Quickly compiles short stories Wood wrote for adult magazines.
 

 

 
More of Ed Wood Jr.‘s pulp fiction, after the jump…

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Leave a comment
The astonishingly beautiful three color photography of Bernard Eilers
08.02.2016
02:46 pm

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In some parallel universe where we’re all smarter, richer and better looking, Bernard F. Eilers would be as well known as, say George Eastman and the vast Kodak empire.

For Eilers (1878-1951) was a Dutch photographer, inventor, businessman and chemist who among his many other career highs devised (over several years) an astonishing three-color process of photography called foto-chroma eilers in 1935. This was a simple yet effective separation technique which delivered (as it was described at the time) near perfect color reproduction. In this parallel universe it is foto-chroma eilers that became the dominant photographic process and not Kodak.

Eilers demonstrated his foto-chroma eilers in a series of photographs. He snapped day and night street scenes of his home city of Amsterdam. Portraits of his friends. Still lifes and extraordinarily beautiful pictures of flowers.

The use of the three-color separation technique in these incredible photographs made Eilers (briefly) world famous. It lasted until Kodak dominated the market with Kodachrome and made foto-chroma eilers redundant and Eilers almost forgotten.

Which was all sadly inevitable yet still rather interesting as this narrative has a parallel subtext of American domination of the global market.

Eilers photographic style may be a tad more painterly than many of his contemporaries—his work reminiscent of those great artists from the 1800s. But Eilers had an uncanny knack for capturing the very essence of what he photographed—whether this was a sense of space or the rich character of his friends. He was understandably a highly respected photographer—who won awards for his work and exhibited widely and he really really should be better known outside of the Netherlands and Europe and any parallel universe.

The following photographs were created by digitizing 927 glass negatives from the Amsterdam Municipal Archives in 2004.

To achieve first-class picture quality, sets of three practically matching black-and-white negatives had to be selected from a far more sizeable total collection. Assembling these sets was an arduous task: they had not always been filed neatly together and could be found among several glass negative formats, particularly among the 4.5 x 6 cm size. In the end, it appeared that the selection of some sets did not lead to a satisfactory result, but the whole operation nevertheless yielded 309 beautiful prints.

You can read about Eilers and see more of his work here.
 
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More stunning color photographs, after the jump…

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
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