The grooviest tarot deck ever: The Linweave Tarot, 1967
03.19.2014
03:01 pm

Topics:
Advertising
Art
Occult

Tags:
Tarot

Linweave Tarot
“Jupiter” and “L’Amoureux”
 
In 1967 the Linweave Paper Co. was looking to promote its outstanding paper products, so they hit on a terrific promotional idea—publish a large-format, full-color tarot deck with art in the contemporary style executed by several top graphic artists of the moment. So they hired Ron Rae, Hy Roth, Nicolas Sidjakov, and David Mario Palladini to do it, and the results was a lively whimsical deck that looks like it came straight out of Yellow Submarine. Unfortunately, the Linweave Paper Co. apparently closed up shop in 1989. So today, that means that the tarot deck is the thing it’s more known for. A collector’s item, it now goes for about $100 used on Amazon.

The actual title of the deck is “Linweave Spells Your Fortune with a Modern Interpretation of the Medieval Tarot Pack: Presented on the Most Exciting Creative Papers in America”—just that alone is pretty awesome. I’ve selected a choice few for presentation here; you can see many more cards at these friendly websites.
 
Linweave Tarot
Linweave Tarot, cover
 
Linweave Tarot
 
Linweave Tarot
“Le Mai”
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Martin Schneider | Discussion
‘U.S.A! U.S.A!’ George Washington dunking on Kim Jong-un. Because America!!!

George Washington dunks on Kim Jong-un
 
A few weeks ago, Redditor fact_school_cat called for an ass-kicking bit of counterfactual patriotic sports propaganda:
 

There is not nearly enough art depicting our country’s Founders playing basketball, a game which was not invented until 100 years after the final colony ratified the Constitution. I want this art…

I haven’t quite decided on content, but I’m thinking either a team of Founding Fathers versus international enemies (think Kim Jong Eun — a real basketball fan) or versus a team of my least favorite players (think Andray Blatche). The game should probably take place in Philadelphia’s basketball arena.

This is a strange but serious request.

 
Redditor I_may_be_Dead (Aaron Needham) has stepped up. That’s the painting he came up with. It’s the best thing I’ve seen in weeks.

I love the detail of Honest Abe Lincoln boxing out Uncle Joe Stalin in the background. You can reach Needham for further commissions at his website or at aaronm.needham@gmail.com.
 
via Deadspin

Posted by Martin Schneider | Discussion
Migraine headaches depicted by artists
03.19.2014
11:35 am

Topics:
Art

Tags:
Pain
Migraines


Migraine Art: The Migraine Experience from Within
 
I’m someone who suffers from migraines. I’ve probably visited the hospital emergency room at least ten times since the age of twelve when I first started to get them. The last time it happened I was puking, snot was running down my face and I was crying. They gave me, I was told, something like ten IV doses of Fentanyl—that’s enough to stop William Burroughs or Keith Richards in their tracks—and it didn’t even put a dent in what I was feeling (nor was it even in the least little bit fun). For the lucky people who’ve never experienced a migraine, these are not your average really terrible headaches. They’re much worse than that. A headache is a “one” and a migraine headache is a “seven” on up. Imagine the pain of an ice pick gouging out your eye for several hours or a jackhammer beating your brain non-stop until you want to explode. Tylenol, aspirin or ibuprofen does nothing to relieve it. The pain is something else, definitely in its own category and incredibly difficult to put into words. That’s why I find these artists depictions of what a migraine feels like so spot-on. You don’t need words. You just look at them and you get it.

They’re lovely in their own way, and yet as a migraine sufferer, I find them kinda discomforting, too. Trust me, I can relate to each and every one of these.

I do take medication that helps me when I feel one coming on. But if you miss that window of opportunity—meaning, it’s in pill form and you might vomit up the pill before it takes effect—you’ll have to ride it out. It can take hours or even days for the excruciating pain to go away.


 

 

 

 

Artist: Michael Bolls
 
Below, Migraines: Not Just Another Headache:

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
Hand-embroidered: Artist sews intricate designs into her own hand
03.19.2014
09:35 am

Topics:
Art
Feminism

Tags:
Embroidery


 
Artist Eliza Bennett has created one of the more intense feminist art projects I’ve seen. For her piece, “A woman’s work is never done,” Bennett actually embroidered crude (but strangely lovely) stitches into the skin of her own hand.  While the points of entry for the thread are tiny and superficial, they occur in such high density that her hand is left swollen and irritated, most likely from the more sensitive layer of skin attempting to reject the foreign material. The work unflinchingly examines traditionally feminine labor, and the usual matronly sweetness of embroidery is suddenly stark, biological and jarring. Her statement:

Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand. By using the technique of embroidery, traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of it’s opposite, I hope to challenge the preconceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy. Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ancillary jobs such as cleaning, caring, and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’.

The final picture below is of a video projection of Bennett’s stitched hand on fabric and wall. The image becomes gauzy though the light of the projector and that jarring photograph is suddenly rendered soft and pretty.
 

 

 

 

 
Via Beautiful Decay

Posted by Amber Frost | Discussion
The Muppets in a hostage situation
03.18.2014
10:58 am

Topics:
Amusing
Art
Television

Tags:
Muppets


 
Poor Beaker being brutalized by balcony-sitting curmudgeons Statler and Waldorf on TV for all to see. I wonder what message they were trying to get out to the general public? I guess we’ll never know… 

“The Hostage Situation” also titled “The Art of Heckling - Part 2” is by Matthias Weinberger.

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
This parrot is actually a painted naked lady
03.17.2014
01:09 pm

Topics:
Animals
Art

Tags:
body painting


 
Okay, so I’m hella late to the game with this one—in Internet “lateness terms” this was passed around last Friday—but for those of you haven’t seen this one yet, this bodypainted rainbow macaw lady was done by artist Johannes Stötter.

It took me a long time until I saw “her.” Start with the tail, that’s one of her legs. Follow it up, see the knee? The left hand is draped over her head. Isn’t that amazing?

Below, a tropical frog painted by Johannes Stötter consisting of five people. Unbelievable.


Via Gizmodo

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
Immortalize your pets in the style of Himalayan ‘Beware of Dog’ signs
03.17.2014
08:18 am

Topics:
Animals
Art

Tags:
Himalayas
dogs


 
I am a cat lady—please feign a gasp or surprise—but I’ve never been one for animal commemoration unless it’s something super-creepy like an urn on the mantle that you can use to scare away Jehovah’s Witnesses. However, I have discovered some pet portraiture I can totally get into—the hand-painted “Beware of Dog” signs of the Himalayas! These beauties are often found on the gates of Nepali homes, but are now falling out of style in favor of mass-produced signs.

As luck would have it, American traveler Michelle Page has set up a new market for the art at Nepal Art Dogs. You can send in a picture of your beloved creature for a custom portrait! Not only is she expanding the market for these artists, she appears to be doing it ethically, saying, “I pay fair trade wages, the artists get to paint again, pet lovers get a choice of three paintings for each commission, and I get to help Nepali artists make a living.”

So you can actually have your dog/cat/chicken immortalized in this milieu. They’re bright, technically sophisticated, and just plain lovely. Yes, these paintings will do quite nicely as I collect more and more cats…
 

 
More after the jump…
 

Posted by Amber Frost | Discussion
Low-Cost Cosplay: For when you can’t afford elaborate costumes
03.14.2014
12:40 pm

Topics:
Amusing
Art
Pop Culture

Tags:
Cosplay


 
Thai Facebook community page Low-Cost Cosplay is a neverending treasure trove of cosplayers giving it their all one toilet paper roll and hot dog at a time!

ALL of these folks deserve an A++++++ for effort!
 

 

 

 

 

 
Many more after the jump…
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
The first kiss ever filmed was between two women, and shot by a murderer
03.14.2014
10:01 am

Topics:
Art
History

Tags:
photography


 
As long as we’re all watching black and white videos of strangers kissing, (and now their X-rated parodies), why don’t we take a stroll down memory lane to the very first filmed kiss, shot by groundbreaking English photographer, Eadweard Muybridge, sometime between 1872 and 1885. The kiss was (gasp) between two women, but lest your prurient interests get the better of you, remember that Victorian culture didn’t really “get” lesbianism, and the nudity was to aid in Muybridge’s dedicated study of motion. From the Muybridge online archives:

While the Victorians were extremely sexually prudish by modern standards and commonly considered male homosexuality a serious threat to their society they believed women had little or no sex drive. Therefore the possibility of lesbianism was commonly ignored.

Because of Victorian sexual taboos Muybridge was not able to photograph men and women naked together and was only able to publish images of naked men together engaging in sports or work. Because he was free to show women naked together he used female models when he wanted to show two people engaging in ordinary activities. In many plates he had one of the women assume a typically male role and these are the plates which today we tend to perceive as homo-erotic.

You can see photos from the series below, as well as Muybridge’s “movie,” The Kiss. Of course, this was well before the invention of the motion picture camera—he simply set up a rig of rapidly firing cameras in sequence.

Fun fact: Muybridge actually shot and killed his wife’s lover, a man called Major Harry Larkyns, upon learning that he may have fathered their seven-month-old son. Muybridge actually tracked the guy down and said,  “Good evening, Major, my name is Muybridge and here’s the answer to the letter you sent my wife,” right before shooting him, point blank. Larkyns died that night, and Muybridge was arrested. He pleaded insanity on account of a 12 year old head head injury. While the jury dismissed the insanity plea, they actually acquitted him for justifiable homicide. Muybridge and his wife divorced, she died, the son was sent to an orphanage, and though Muybridge paid the boy’s childhood expenses, he did not maintain contact.

So to review: Shooting people who sleep with your wife—ok. Women and men being filmed together—very not ok. That’s those wacky Victorians for you!
 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Amber Frost | Discussion
‘Prison Landscapes’ reveals the painted backdrops of commemorative prison portraits
03.12.2014
08:25 am

Topics:
Art

Tags:
photography
prisons


 
Photographer Alyse Emdur’s affecting book of photography, Prison Landscapes explores one of the lesser known traditions of the U.S. correctional system—the commemorative prison portrait. Whether it’s the memento of a family visit or the celebration of an achievement like acquiring a GED, Emdur’s photographs evoke a lot of emotions. On the one hand, some of the subjects look legitimately happy, and small joys are the stuff of prison survival. On the other hand, the chintzy backdrops are reminiscent of aquarium decorations, complete with fake foliage and fantasy scenes.

Of course, U.S. prisons are notorious for their lack of transparency, so Emdur compiled her material from inmates and their loved ones themselves. She spent years collecting the pictures, corresponding with contacts to, in her own words, “document a system that I did not have physical access to.” Refusing to shy away from the political implications of her work, she explicitly deconstructs the facade of the backdrops, saying:

“Prison visiting room portraits are constructed to intentionally leave out the reality of prison. The aim of my project is not to be an authority on that which is left out, but to rather make the artifice visible. Although the paintings on the backdrops represent freedom, they are vehicles to control the representation of prisons and prisoners.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Via Beautiful Decay

Posted by Amber Frost | Discussion
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