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‘South Park’ hilariously rips on today’s music in last night’s episode
10.09.2014
08:54 am

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Amusing
Animation
Television

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South Park


 
Here’s a little cut from last night’s South Park—episode 3 of season 18 titled “The Cissy”—where Randy shows his son Stan how it’s really done in the music world today.

Matt Stone and Trey Parker nail it as usual. Nail it.

 
h/t Peter Serafinowicz

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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‘I am being followed by a Moonshadow’: Cat Stevens cartoon with Spike Milligan’s voice
09.17.2014
12:03 pm

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Animation
Music

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Spike Milligan
Cat Stevens


 
Although there will always be people who will want to bitch and moan about Cat Stevens and some very regrettable remarks he made (more than once), these comments were uttered a very long time ago, he’s apologized (convincingly) a gazillion times for them since and it’s not like anyone died, so kindly move along if you are one of them. On point, the man has done a whole lot more good for the world than bad with his music, who is going to deny this?

For me, the news yesterday that Cat Stevens/Yusuf would be releasing a new R&B influenced album, Tell ‘Em I’m Gone and making an unexpected US tour sent me immediately to the website to buy tickets (but they weren’t on sale yet).

No surprise that the North American tour includes no southern states, the brief sprint will include five American dates in Boston, New York, Chicago, San Francisco and Los Angeles and one Canadian stop at Toronto’s Massey Hall that kicks the tour off on December 1.

It also reminded me that I wanted to post the animated “Moonshadow” short based on Stevens’ own drawings and voiced by British comedian Spike Milligan. The film was made in 1972 by an animator named Charles Jenkins (who had also worked on Yellow Submarine) from Stevens’ original drawings to promote the Teaser and the Firecat album. It was not widely seen however until it was made part of the Fantastic Animation Festival feature film in 1977. Cat Stevens also put out a Teaser and the Firecat book in 1972, which is where these illustrations are from. It’s the story of tophat-wearing Teaser and his pet, the Firecat and their adventures trying to put the moon back in the sky after it plops onto the roof of a barn one night.
 

 

 

 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Discussion
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‘Where Are They Now?’: Bleak animation about the current lives of 80s cartoon characters
09.16.2014
08:25 am

Topics:
Amusing
Animation

Tags:
80s cartoons


 
Being an aging rockstar is bad enough, but there are always the “oldies” package tours that play state fairs and casinos. Ever wonder what happened to your favorite 80s cartoon characters once the cartoon work dried up? Animator Steve Cutts gives you a bleak look into the current lives of Roger and Jessica Rabbit, He-Man, The Thunder Cats, ALF, Garfield, The Smurfs and so on. It ain’t pretty.

He-Man’s life is pretty rockin’, tho. He seems to have been smart with his money, something that cannot be said of most cartoon characters. I saw Underdog in a Starbucks recently, he looked like shit. Hasn’t worked steadily since 1967. I overheard him bitching about how Lorne Michaels had ruined his career…

 
via Laughing Squid

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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Lemmy’s mole sings ‘Ace of Spades’
09.16.2014
06:03 am

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Animation
Music

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Lemmy

Molelemmy1.jpg
 
As Lemmy will tell you himself, those facial bumps are not warts they’re moles. He did have warts once, on his hands, nineteen of them with one going round his finger like a snake. But they all disappeared, one night, after he had a bath though his hands never went in the water. Or, so he claims.

Lemmy’s moles are famous. They even have their own Facebook page, with an ambition to “conquer every woman who gaze upon them.” Who knew they could be such aphrodisiacs?

They have also been the focus of much speculation from music journalists, who seem unable to resist asking why the LA-based legend has never had plastic surgery to have them removed? Usually, Lemmy just points to his mutton-chopped face and says:

What can you make out of this? What are you going to do? I think I look all right for my age, anyway.

Apart from being conversational ice-breakers, Lemmy’s moles have recently inspired one fan to make this little animation of Lemmy’s mole performing “Ace of Spades.”
 

 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
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Rock snob comedy: In the studio with David Bowie, Brian Eno and Tony Visconti, 1976
09.15.2014
02:21 pm

Topics:
Animation
Music

Tags:
David Bowie
Brian Eno
Tony Visconti


 
“Don’t you wonder sometimes…”

This latest animated installment of a “behind the scenes” moment in the life of David Bowie from British comic Adam Buxton is very fucking amusing. What really went on with the recording of Low‘s “Warszawa”? This fly-on-the-wall speculation of what transpired at the Château d’Hérouville studio during those sessions is probably, what, 90% accurate? 95%?

All voices by Adam Buxton (damn his Bowie is good!). The animation was produced by The Brothers McLeod. More Bowie animations (and more) at Adam Buxton’s YouTube channel.
 

 
Thank you kindly to the original rock snob himself, Steven Daly!

Posted by Richard Metzger | Discussion
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Plastic Surgery Disaster: Powerful animation about trying to obtain ‘female perfection’
09.12.2014
08:39 am

Topics:
Animation
Current Events
Hysteria

Tags:
plastic surgery


 
This disturbing, powerful and eye-opening animation, “Supervenus” by Frédéric Doazan doesn’t mince… meat with getting its message across, does it?

In it, a female anatomical drawing goes for plastic surgery. She is cut up, given botox and liposuction, and is finally transformed into a blonde bombshell. The procedures do not stop there, however, and take on nightmarish proportions.

This animation is painful to watch—it documents the pressure that women face as they feel like they have to look a certain way, as well as their love-hate relationship with their bodies.

Living in Los Angeles this is something you’re faced with every single day in the most mundane places. Supermarkets, the car wash. There’s a Jocelyn Wildenstein in every yoga class in town. The only minor quibble I have with the piece is that’s is not just women who are feeling the pressures of “unattainable beauty”—due to all the photoshop nonsense in magazines—but men are too. I mean, look (try not to gawk) at Bruce Jenner, Mickey Rourke, Sylvester Stallone and so forth. Clearly they’ve also been “infected” with the body dysmorphic virus.
 

 
Thank you Alice Lowe, of London, England!

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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Trippy ‘Fantasia’ parody shows evolution of life from a germy alien soda bottle


 
Bruno Bozzetto’s Allegro Non Troppo (“Fast, not too fast”) is a full-length animated parody of Fantasia made in Italy in 1976, so you should probably let that sink in for a minute. Debussy, Vivaldi, Stravinsky and others are the soundtrack for a series of snarky cartoon vignettes that frankly, give Disney a run for its (vast sums of) money. My personal favorite segment however is Ravel’s Boléro, which chronicles the birth of life from the primordial stew of a Coca-Cola bottle, tossed out by a careless spaceman.

What follows is a perfect compliment to the rich swell of Boléro. Creatures grow and change and shift into multitudes, marching across a shifting landscape with a graceful sense of purpose. Eventually of course, man is born, and the vast diversity of life is crushed by the vulgar descendants of apes and their brutal cities. There’s a tragicomic fatalism to the whole parade that is never observed by the progenitor astronauts, who are probably off somewhere else, casually littering ultimately doomed cradles of life onto other faraway planets like intergalactic Johnny Appleseeds.
 

Posted by Amber Frost | Discussion
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Eye-catching (but let’s face it, creepy) baby GIFs
08.29.2014
08:06 am

Topics:
Animation
Art

Tags:
GIFs


 
I’m lovin’ and hatin’ these mesmerizing baby GIFs by Austin-based designer and animator, Hayden Zezula. They remind me of something I’ve seen before, but I can’t place my finger on it.
 

 

 

 

 
via Boing Boing

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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‘Peyote Queen’: Storm De Hirsch, the woman who made movies without a camera
08.26.2014
08:14 am

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Animation
Art
Drugs
Movies

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Storm de Hirsch


 
Storm De Hirsch is one of those avant-garde goddesses without much name-recognition outside of underground film circles, but her influence and dynamism has always been lauded by peers. Jonas Mekas, for example (often referred to as the “godfather of American avant-garde cinema”), called her psychedelic classic, Peyote Queen, “among my favorites ... beauty and excitement.”

De Hirsch was actually a published poet before transitioning to film, and as such didn’t have ready access to a camera early on. Her first improvisational techniques were innovative manipulations of whatever film was just lying around at the time, making her as much a “sculptor” of celluloid as a filmmaker. The results of her experiments are now recognized as foundational films in avant-garde cinema. In an interview with Mekas, she spoke of her early work, like Peyote Queen, saying:

I wanted badly to make an animated short, but I had no camera available.  I did have some old, unused film stock and several rolls of 16mm sound tape. So I used that—plus a variety of discarded surgical instruments and the sharp edge of a screwdriver — by cutting, etching, and painting directly on both film and [sound] tape

 

 
De Hirsch continued making films into the 1970s, and though she eventually got ahold of a camera, it’s what she accomplished without one that most baldly represents her creative drive. She was dedicated to the work and its preservation, even hand repairing the raw film itself, (which one would assume was left very delicate after her initial artistic mangling). One of her former intern even remembers her hand-coloring the fading frames of Peyote Queen with magic marker in 1973, restoring the splashy, electric feel you see below.

 

Posted by Amber Frost | Discussion
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‘Bukowski, it’s going to be sickening’: Charles Bukowski uncensored and animated
08.14.2014
12:44 pm

Topics:
Amusing
Animation
Heroes

Tags:
Charles Bukowski


 
A candid conversation between Charles Bukowski, his then-wife Linda Lee Beighle and his co-producer John Runnette (the one asking the questions) from the 1993 Run With The Hunted recording session. Although this is just a short snippet of a conversation, it’s a perfect moment that reveals so much about the writer’s private self, which, in fact, doesn’t seem all that different from the version of himself that he presented in his autobiographical novels. I suppose imbibing as much alcohol as Buk did on a daily basis might erase that public/private dividing line quite a bit!

Bukowski: I just don’t love my stuff that much. You know what I’m interested in? What I’m going to type tomorrow night. That’s all that interests me… the next poem, the next fucking line. What’s past is past I don’t want to linger over it, and read it and play with it and jolly it up. it’s gone, it’s done. If you can’t write the next line, well, you’re dead. The past doesn’t matter.

~snip

Bukowski: I think my writing is really pretty fucking powerful stuff but I think after I’m dead and safe, they’re going to trot me out, I’m going to really be discovered you know.

Animation by HarperAudio.
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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