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Adorable handmade diorama cards featuring Delia Derbyshire, Roxy Music, De La Soul and many more
10.10.2016
12:04 pm

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Art
Design
Music

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Delia Derbyshire
 
I normally don’t care about papercraft objects, I guess because I wouldn’t know exactly how to use or display them. They seem so fragile to me. That was until I saw this adorable Delia Derbyshire paper diorama card featured via a friend’s Facebook page. It would make a perfect gift for someone who’s a fan of Derbyshire. It looks sturdy, too!

Well, It piqued my interest and I discovered they’re made by Etsy shop HeyKidsRocknRoll. Not only is there one of Delia Derbyshire but pop-up cards of Roxy Music, Grandmaster Flash, De La Soul, Stevie Wonder, Run-D.M.C., Raymond Scott and Hank Williams, too.

Sadly, it looks like someone has already purchased the one of Derbyshire. But I’m sure if you contact the Etsy shop directly and inquire, more could possibly be made.

At least I hope so! I want one!


Roxy Music
 

Stevie Wonder
 

Grandmaster Flash
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Red Red Wine: Beautiful carafes inspired by the bloodstream
10.10.2016
09:50 am

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Art
Design

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A diagram of our veins and arteries may look like a congested roadmap, but to Etienne Meneau the circulatory system has inspired him to design Strange Carafes—beautiful handblown decanters or vessels for pouring wine.

Each decanter is produced in a limited signed edition of eight and cost 2,500 euros—around $2,800. The carafes are made from borosilicate glass—which Meneau describes as a “chemically and thermically” robust kind of glass highly suitable for use in creating his large and intricate decanters.

The finished product may look more like a sculpture or artwork than something to pour the plonk—but after a few practice lessons training with water “you will can perfectly pour wine in a glass without any drop anywhere. The main rule of this new game is : where is the wine?.” Meneau’s most recent designs can be seen and bought here.
 
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More wine tasting, after the jump…

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Cthulhu Approved: High-heeled tentacle shoes
10.06.2016
09:30 am

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Design
Fashion

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Totally insane-looking—and probably not practicable footwear—tentacle high-heeled shoes made by fashion designer, costume designer and shoe designer Kermit Tesoro. I can’t imagine walking in these. Hell, I can’t even walk in heels to begin with!

I just checked out Kermit Tesoro’s Facebook page to see if he had any other equally freaky high-heeled designs and it looks like he’s also got a Venus flytrap shoe. Why not? Again, probably totally impractical unless you’re Lady Gaga or a Japanese porn star. Why can’t someone just make sensible shoes that look like alien creatures eating your feet?


 

“EQUILIBRIA” by Kermit Tesoro (2016)
 
All images via Kermit Tesoro on Facebook

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Stunning Erotic Tattoos
09.30.2016
10:31 am

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Art
Design
Sex

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I don’t have any tattoos but if ever I do consider getting one then I certainly could be tempted by these beautiful erotic tattoos by Bordeaux-based tattoo artist Sad Amish.

Unlike the more traditional ship’s anchors, bluebirds, Celtic doodles or Pictish script Sad Amish’s stunning monochrome tattoos are high quality graphic art with a wonderfully charged eroticism.

The tattoos feature women artfully posed in bondage gear, fetish wear or playfully fondling a bong while enjoying a mouthful of vin blanc. All beautifully rendered in the deepest blackest ink.

More of Sad Amish’s work can be viewed here.
 
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More of Sad Amish’s fab monochrome skin art, after the jump…

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
A Naked Alphabet: The Human Body as Typography (NSFW)
09.22.2016
10:38 am

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Amusing
Art
Design
Sex

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To paraphrase L. P. Hartley: The 1970s is a foreign country: they do things differently there.

The sexual liberation that favored metropolitan areas in the 1960s spread across country during the seventies. Suddenly—or so it seemed—everybody was enjoying the “zipless fuck.” There were guide books offering useful tips on how to have a better sex life. Married couples were swinging. Nudity was celebrated. Porn was ubiquitous. Orgasms compulsory. Yet, it was still very much the male heterosexual eye that influenced everything.

In 1971, a small group of Dutch artists, photographers and graphic designers—Ed van der Elsken, Anna Beeke, Pieter Brattinga, Anthony Beeke, and Geert Kooiman captured this (newish) sexual freedom with a naked human alphabet—published in Avant Garde Magazine No.14: Belles Lettres. The letters were created using naked women—who lay, curled and bent into the appropriate shapes.

But this wasn’t just mere titillation—this artful display of female nudity was a protest “against the supposedly ‘dehumanising’ and thoroughly ‘indecipherable’ mechanistic alphabets.”

The typeface (in case you’re wondering) for these photographs is said to be Baskerville Old Face.
 
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More barenaked letters, after the jump…

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Thread Bare: Examining racial and sexual identity through erotic embroidery
09.22.2016
09:36 am

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Art
Design

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These are quite beautiful—Jessica So Ren Tang’s embroidered pinups of “suggestively posed” women.

Jessica uses embroidery to explore her Asian-American identity—“the dualism of being too Asian to be American, and too American to be Asian.” Her work includes embroidered reproductions of Chinese bowls, takeaway noodle boxes, candy wrappers and decorative plates.

In her portrait series of pinup girls Jessica has replaced their “the facial identity” with exquisite Asian textile patterns.

The patterned skin creates a broader spectrum of Asian identity; it becomes more ambiguous and fluid as identity moves between the two.

The resulting image also captures an erotic charge between the model’s pose and the sensual nature of the embroidered patterns. Each portrait is hand embroidered on a piece of 8” x 10”  fabric. More of Jessica’s work can be seen here.
 
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‘Girl 04’ (2016).
 
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More of Jessica So Ren Tang’s fabulous work, after the jump…

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
The Eighties will flash before your eyes with these covers from The Face magazine
09.15.2016
09:59 am

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Design
Heroes
Media
Pop Culture

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The Specials’ Jerry Dammers on the cover of The Face #1.
 
I had a weekend job in a small newsagents in Easter Road, Edinburgh, working behind the counter selling papers, magazines, cigarettes, sweets, ice cream and fizzy drinks. You got to know the customers by what they bought. The woman with the Pekinese who always ordered a quarter of Parma violets on a Sunday afternoon. The old drunk who chain smoked in the shop while waiting for the Saturday night sports final. The kids who thought I didn’t see them trying to steal penny chews when my back was turned. It was a fun job. I liked it. The people were good, the work was easy—if the hours long.

Every month a selection of magazines came in—some ordered for customers, some on spec. One month, a new magazine arrived. Glossy, bright, full of articles about music, film, books, politics and fashion. It was like nothing I had ever seen before. This was no cheap youth pop mag. It was well-produced, high quality, beautifully designed (by Neville Brody) with smart intelligent articles by a college of young, sassy writers—Julie Burchill, Charles Shaar Murray, Ian Penman, Paul Morley, and Stuart Cosgrove. The magazine was called The Face. I bought it and placed an order thereafter. This was in May 1980.

The Face was the pop culture magazine of the 1980s and 1990s. No other magazine (or weekly music paper) ever came close to the quality or content of The Face. It was edited by Nick Logan from a small office on Mortimer Street, London. Logan had previously been editor of the NME when he made that paper hip, relevant and essential reading. He then started Smash Hits based around a “vague notion of a kids’ pop magazine.” It proved to be massively popular. Its success allowed Logan to try out another idea—The Face.

The Face was the bible for most late teens-twentysomethings during the eighties. In 1983, I was editing a student magazine. This collegiate journal had been a languishing students’ poetry mag. Inspired by Logan—I reinvented it as a student version of The Face. I filled it with interviews featuring the Fun Boy Three, Annie Lennox, Blancmange, Aztec Camera, Spear of Destiny, The Young Ones, Julie Walters, Neil Jordan, Fay Weldon, Tony Marchant and anyone I thought might of interest to my fellow students. Of course, as a tip of the hat I had to interview Nick Logan, the man who inspired it all. I traveled on an overnight bus to London and arrived in the offices in Mortimer Street. This was how I described him back then:

Nick Logan was born thirty-five years ago in London. He was educated at Leyton Grammar School, London. He left school at the age of fifteen. He is a thin. Smartly dressed. Wears glasses. Not easily impressed—ambitious, modest, talented. An ideas man as much as a leader.

From school Logan worked as a reporter on a local paper, the Walthamstow Guardian. He worked there for five years turning his hand to everything “subbing, proofing, editing and layout” before joining the NME as a staff writer.

I wanted to know about The Face. Logan said:

“The Face is what I would have come up with if I’d had more time at NME. I mean we used to say, ‘What could we do if we owned the magazine?’

“The first issue was started on a kitchen table and half in the corner of somebody’s office. A part of it is still done at home. My house is full of bits and pieces of The Face. You can physically trip over it at home.

“My wife [Julie] looks after back issues, keeps the books, pays contributors.”

The Face had a small staff: only two full-time employees—Logan and Intro/Front Desk Leslie White. There was also designer Brody—who was responsible for “80% of the way The Face looked” and assistant editor Paul Rambali.

The Face was individualistic. It didn’t try to compete with the weekly music press.

“There would be little point in that anyway. What we try to do is offer an alternative view or take a different line on a subject which others might cover as well.

“What interests The Face is very much what interests the staff of The Face—though that’s not to say we approve (if that’s the right word) of everything we report on.”

Each issue took four weeks to produce. The first week the staff recovered “shell-shocked from finishing the last one” and started planning the next one. Features were commissioned by the second week. Then the layout began. During the third week pages were proofed, photos reversed.

“In the fourth week: I disappear to the typesetter in Kilburn so I don’t have the hassle of people coming in. Then Leslie and Paul come down and give a hand. It’s bloody hard work. I’ll finish about six. Eat. Go home and work till twelve or one. That’s when it gets particularly nasty. You’re no longer living. You feel totally worthless. Useless. You can say it’s only one week—-but doing it after 37 issues you feel really bad.

“The short-term ambitions are to get a few extra sales. get more ads. Get better features and photos. And more readers. It’s just been standing holding up the wall collapsing.”

It was all worth it. For The Face changed so many people’s lives. I know it changed mine.

Below is a selection of covers from the first 50 issues of The Face. Check out pages from The Face here.
 
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Paul Weller #2.
 
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Bryan Ferry #3.
 
More choice covers from the first 50 issues of The Face, after the jump…

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Ike and Tina Turner’s former home is for sale and it’s a GROOVY 1970s time capsule
09.15.2016
08:46 am

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Design
Music

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A four bedroom home located in View Park, California that was once owned by none other than Ike and Tina Turner is for sale. It was last sold in 1977 to a woman named Amanda Pittman. According to Pittman, she kept some of the Turner’s furnishings intact and well, as you can plainly see… she didn’t really update it at all. It’s a 1970s time capsule to say the very least. In fact, some of the scenes from What’s Love Got to Do With It—a movie based on Tina Turner’s life—was filmed in the house.

Pittman recalls that Ike Turner had the sofas custom-made, but they were upholstered in a red, possibly velvet material that she disliked, so she had them redone in beige. (Owners are still determining whether or not the furniture is up for sale, says listing agent Ken Conant.)

That’s a deal breaker!

The home is listed at 999k. You can see more photos here.


 

 

 
More after the jump…

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
‘Hellraising’ design for new arts venue at World Trade Center revealed (possibly full of Cenobites)
09.13.2016
09:45 am

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Design
Movies

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The Guardian reported that a design has been unveiled for a new arts venue at the World Trade Center. The translucent, veined marble and glass building designed by architect Joshua Prince-Ramus is a proposed 99,000 square feet with three auditoriums and a rehearsal room. The rooms and halls will feature movable walls to create up to 11 configurations, with the largest configuration able to hold up to 1,200 people for bigger events. The $250m project is scheduled to open in 2020.

What the article failed to mention is the uncanny similarity between the building and the Lemarchand’s “Lament Configuration” box from Clive Barker’s Hellraiser series of films. The fact that the building contains reconfigurable rooms makes the similarity even more profound.
 

The Lament Configuration
 
In the Hellraiser films, solving this puzzle box creates a bridge through which demonic beings called Cenobites may enter the mortal realm to bring about pain and suffering.
 

Solve the puzzle and you get these guys.
 
We think the proposed building at the WTC site is quite gorgeous, but we’re concerned that it could be full of Cenobites who want to tear our souls apart.

After the jump, see what happens when you mess around with the box…

Posted by Christopher Bickel | Leave a comment
Grab life by the nuts with these ‘desk balls’
09.06.2016
08:44 am

Topics:
Amusing
Design

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Well, now everyone can get a pair…

Think of them as stress balls. Something to help offload anxiety, anger or you know just blow off steam as your boss berates you for something minor and petty. You just smile, absorb his asshattery and imagine squeezing his balls until he shrieks in pain. All in good fun!

Nice Balls is a squeezable pink bawbag. A “pendulous prosthetic supplement” which can be attached to the underside of any work or school desk “in a simple, discreet and efficient manner.” Once in place the user can then squeeze this nut sack to their heart’s content or their hand gets sore…

Nice Balls manufacturer Imagine claim these “balls” swing in a “Euclidean curve” which (apparently) “generates” a sense of relaxation. (Who knew?. Also, Nice Balls people: why a female in the promotional photos?)

Although it’s difficult to understand why someone over the age of 11 would think this is funny (or bring them into the workplace) fascist leader Benito Mussolini used to touch his crown jewels to ward off the evil eye, so maybe there’s something similar going on here?
 
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More balls out fun after the jump…

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
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