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Discovering Dad: Terry Gilliam’s daughter uncovers her father’s artworks

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I probably owe Terry Gilliam money. I nicked his book Animations of Mortality when I was a kid as I wanted to improve my skills at drawing cartoons. Gilliam’s work was a big influence, (along with Ronald Searle and Ralph Steadman), and I spent hours perusing the pages of my pilfered goods, learning how to create art from a Master

What joy, therefore, to find Mr Gilliam’s daughter Holly has started a blog uncovering her father’s brilliant work, uploading discoveries on an almost daily basis.

Since October last year, Holly has undertaken this mammoth task of organizing her father’s archive:

....all his work from pre-Python days, as a cartoonist, photojournalist & assistnat editor for Help! magazine, through all his original artwork and cut-outs for Python animation, posters, logos and generally everything Python, to his storyboards, designs and sketches for his feature films and other non-film related projects (including his opera of “Faust” and that infamous Nike commercial).  Why!? Because I have been lucky enough to be surrounded by my father’s amazing work all my life and I think it should be seen by everyone so I am organising the archive so it can eventually be put in a book and an exhibition.

Holly is to be commended for this fabulous undertaking and I’m more than delighted she is sharing her father’s spectacular art works, and am now certainly willing to cough up the five quid owing on the book.

See more of this on-going project at Discovering Dad aka delving into Terry Gilliam’s personal archive. Or, follow Holly on twitter for updates. All images copyright Terry Gilliam.
 
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Previously on Dangerous Minds

Terry Gilliam: How he made stop-frame animations in his bedroom


 
Bonus Gilliam’s Monty Python illustration, after the jump…
 
Via Laughing Squid
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
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‘Hilum’: Puppets under the influence of magic
07.25.2012
05:27 pm

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Art
Dance
Design

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Hilum


 
Hilum is a strikingly beautiful and quite spooky fantasy created by marionette designer and manipulator Patrick Sims of Les Antliaclastes puppet theater.

The manipulators dressed and masked in white lace become a part of the surreal world of Hilum as they interact with the puppets in an opium-like dream. In medical terminology hilum is the point where blood vessels and nerves enter and begin to vein their way through an organ, not unlike an umbilical cord or a puppet’s strings, carrying energy and primal instruction - magic embodied.

Hilum takes place in the basement laundry room of a second-rate Natural History Museum. The cellarage is populated by a host of dubiously adorable urchins who have, for some reason or other, been cut off from the rest of the kingdom of curiosities that has remained ordered upstairs. Orphaned and liberated from their hosts, the prenatal rascals amuse themselves as most children would do at this age. Washer-women attend to their opus of bleaching laundry, despite the frequent shenanigans of the children.What starts off as mere women’s work and child’s play eventually becomes impossible. In the cubic crucible- whites mix with colours, wools are washed with warm water, the cat is chucked into the heavy duty rinse… and playtime quickly becomes a downright theatre of cruelty.

Video directed and filmed by Sébastien Jousse, Franck Littot and Benoit Millot.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Discussion
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Gallery of Lost Art: A century of vanished work by the likes of Freud, Kahlo & Duchamp

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It is strange to think that some the most important works of art from the past 100 years have been lost, erased, destroyed, stolen, censored, or allowed to rot, and can now no longer be seen.

The Gallery of Lost Art is a virtual exhibition that reconstructs the stories behind the disappearances of some of the world’s best known and influential works of art. It’s the biggest virtual exhibition of its kind, and is curated by Jennifer Mundy, and is produced by the Tate in association with Channel 4 television. The virtual Gallery has been beautifully designed by digital studio ISO, and the site will be kept live for 12 months, before it is lost.

Amongst those currently on exhibition at the Gallery of Lost Art are:

Lucian Freud Portrait of Francis Bacon (1952)

This small painting was stolen in at exhibition in Germany on May 27th, 1988. It is considered one of Freud’s best early works, and although there was a police investigation and a hefty reward (300,000DM) the portrait has never been recovered.
 
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Tracey Emin: Everyone I have Ever Slept With 1963-1995

Made in 1995, when Tracey Emin was still relatively unknown, Everyone I Have Ever Slept With 1963-1995 is a tent covered with the names of all the people Emin had slept with, including lovers, friends, family members and foetus 1, foetus 2. Inspired by an exhibition of Tibetan nomadic culture, which included examples of their tents, which are used by Tibetan monks for meditation, Everyone I Have Ever Slept With 1963-1995 made Emin an over-night sensation and one of the most controversial artists working in Britain at that time. The work was bought by Charles Saatchi, who kept it (along with hundreds of other art works), in a warehouse in London’s east end. In 2004, a fire destroyed this warehouse and most of Saatchi’s collection - including 40 paintings by Patrick Heron.

The Gallery of Lost Art - see the exhibition here, before it is gone.
 
More Lost Art from Kahlo, Sutherland and Duchamp, after the jump…
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
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The perfect gift for the wine-o who has everything
07.11.2012
05:04 pm

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Advertising
Amusing
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Drugs

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Wine-o


 
For the upscale brown bagger, wine-o who has everything, or hipster desperate to burnish his street cred without sacrificing the convenience of a cool sip of Sauvignon Blanc.

Wine’O may look like a run-of-the-mill paper bag, but it¬s really super-strong non-woven fabric that¬s quilted and insulated to keep the chill in your chardonnay. Naturally, it’s reusable - so anytime you need to tote a bottle, it’s in the bag.”


Fred and Friends
will be selling these soon in case you want to pick one up for that special grapehead in your life.
 

 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Discussion
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Full-length gown made out 50,000 gummy bears, inspired by an Alexander McQueen design
07.06.2012
12:22 pm

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Amusing
Design
Fashion

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Alexander McQueen
Gummy Bears


 
I never really understood the Internets’ fascination with gummy bears. It all seemed a little pointless, and silly to me.

Until now!

Maybe I’m moving over to the darkside or something, becasue I simply adore this 220-pound Alexander McQueen-inspired gown constructed by Hissa Igarashi and Sayuri Marakumi for TWELV magazine.

To create the masterpiece, steel wire was twisted into the shape of the dress and covered with a sheet of vinyl. Then 50,000 gummy bears were painstakingly glued on by hand in a colorful pattern reminiscent of a Chevron rainbow.

Taking three weeks to complete, the final dress was fitted exactly to MAJOR model Jessica Pitti’s measurements. And weighing in at approximately 220 pounds, required the strength of three adults to move.

 

 
Below, the Alexander McQueen dress Hissa Igarashi and Sayuri Marakumi took their inspiration from.
 

 
Via Laughing Squid

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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Nerd Glass: Stained glass characters and logos for nerds only
07.02.2012
10:58 am

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Amusing
Art
Design
Heroes
Movies
Television

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Stained glass


The TARDIS

I love this. Artist Judith Mascolo makes these wonderful one-of-kind glass pieces of pretty much anything you wanna nerd-out to like Dungeons and Dragons, Doctor Who’s trusty TARDIS, Futurama , superhero logos and much more.

Mascolo takes custom orders, too. I wonder if she’d make a stained glass Troy and Abed for me? Now that would be somethin’!

See more of her work at Nerd Glass
 

D&D
 

Wonder Woman logo
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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Brian Eno: ‘Music for Films’ design contest announced
06.29.2012
11:24 am

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Art
Design
Heroes
Music

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Brian Eno


 
Dangerous Minds pal, Los Angeles-based architect John Bertram, is sponsoring a new design contest at his Nabokov-obsessed blog, Venus febriculosa. This time, however, the contest is to create alternate art for Brian Eno’s decidedly minimalist (in every respect) Music For Films:

Brian Eno’s album covers have always tended toward the interesting, (one or two I find exceptional, notably Music for Airports), and he was fortunate to count work by the brilliant artists Tom Phillips and Russell Mills among them. On some level, however, the covers have always seemed more intent on establishing Eno’s artistic, intellectual, and theoretical bona fides (and, especially with the earlier albums, his overall weirdness) than anything else. The cover for Music for Films, however, is radically different.  Not so much designed as intentionally left blank, the chocolate brown Helvetica text is pushed to the extreme upper edges of the texture-less and indescribably beige cover (the same text layout was used to good effect for the Cluster collaborations After the Heat and Begegnungen). This apotheosis of neutrality avoided the plain brown wrapper look in favor of what in retrospect seems closer to the generic packaging popular in grocery stores in the late ‘70s (or perhaps a reference color from Interiors, Woody Allen’s beige-est Bergman-esque film, also from 1978). Importantly, the cover is not ‘conceptual’ in the way that Richard Hamilton’s design for The Beatles’ White Album is, nor has it the cool rigor and studied minimalism of any number of ECM or Factory Records covers that – brilliant as they are (and they are brilliant) – somehow appear positively baroque in comparison. Rather, music and cover co-exist nicely as a unit, the latter providing no commentary on the former (or anything else for that matter), simply existing as a visual analogue to the wordless music. It’s a nice conceit.

The contest will be judged by Geeta Dayal, staff writer at Wired.com and author of Another Green World; famed graphic designer and typeface maven, Frith Kerr; Medicine man and former DM blogger Brad Laner, who contributed to Brian Eno’s Another Day on Earth album; Russell Mills, artist; illustrator and Eno collaborator on More Dark Than Shark and cultural critic Rick Poynor, who also collaborated with Mills and Eno on More Dark than Shark.

There are a lot of DM readers who are both graphic designers and Eno fans, so get your engines started. Deadline for entry is September 1, 2012 and the winner will receive $500 (and some additional Eno-related prizes that have yet to be announced.)

Go to Venus febriculosa.for more information.
 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Discussion
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Smileys from 1881
06.25.2012
01:45 pm

Topics:
Amusing
Design
History
Media

Tags:
Smileys
Typography
emoticons

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Nothing is new is everything is repeated. Well possibly, as the cool folks over at Retronaut show with these original emoticons from 1881.
 
With thanks to Andrew McColgan, via Retronaut
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
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KA-BOOM! Great collection of vintage firecracker labels
06.25.2012
12:33 pm

Topics:
Art
Design

Tags:
Firecrackers


 
Flickr user Mr Brick Label says he’s been collecting firecracker and firework labels since 1968. He writes, “I buy, sell and trade firecracker labels.”

I’ve never really studied a firecracker label before, I had no idea how much work and creativity goes into designing a package for something you’re just going to blow up anyway.

Here are a few choice picks from Mr Brick Label‘s never-ending collection.
 

 

 
More after the jump…

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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Glass Chewbacca marijuana pipe


 
Two great tastes that taste great together: Star Wars and weed, amirite?

This handmade Wookie glass pipe was designed and created by the artist known as “Creep.”
 

 
Via Dressed Like Machines

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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