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Post-Rave Parking Lot: This 90s answer to ‘Heavy Metal Parking Lot’ is LOL funny
09.26.2014
09:29 am

Topics:
Amusing
Dance
Drugs
Music

Tags:
Raves


 
Here’s a short video documenting the, er, aftermath of a post Fantazia rave event that occurred on December 31, 1993 in Hungerford, Wiltshire. According to Wikipedia, over 16,000 people attended the event.

Much like the 1986 video documentary Heavy Metal Parking Lot, you get a brief—and kinda hilarious—glimpse into the lives of some of the folks who were at the Fantazia rave. Trust me on this, the video is all about the girl wearing the black hat and plaid jacket. She never stops. She’s like the Energizer Bunny on the best E ever!

Interviewer: Are you guys going to stop ever or are you going to keep dancing forever?

Girl: I can keep dancing forever, me. Well, at least till I remember where I put my car.

This is well worth the watch for shits and giggles. I just wish it were longer.
 

 
via WFMU on Twitter

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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Sorted for E’s & Wizz: The man who makes art out of ecstasy pills
09.26.2014
08:22 am

Topics:
Art
Drugs

Tags:
ecstasy
Chemical X

Dxtc444.jpg
 
The artist Chemical X turns ecstasy pills into art.

Arranging the pills by their color, Chemical X then uses the “disco biscuits” to create mosaics of doves, smileys, rising suns—those associated logos of ecstasy tablets—and skulls. Chemical X says his art allows the viewer to re-examine their relationship with “an old friend or perhaps a feared enemy.”

Known for designing the original Ministry Of Sound logo, Chemical X has previously collaborated with Banksy and Damien Hirst. His last exhibition in London was closed down over fears about thousands of MDMA-laced beans on site. Now, Chemical X is exhibiting his most recent work at The Ark in London, as part of a group exhibition organised by Bear Cub Gallery between 26th September and 2nd October.

I suppose the only way to find out if these pills are genuinely ecstasy is to lick the art works and see.
 
Axtc111.jpg
 
Extc555.jpg
 
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Fxtc666.jpg
 
Cxtc333.jpg
 
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Lxtc121212.jpg
 
Gxtc777.jpg
 
More art and ecstasy, after the jump…
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
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Caught between the moon and New York City: Christopher Cross, soft rock acid freak
09.25.2014
06:51 am

Topics:
Drugs
Music

Tags:
LSD
Christopher Cross


Christopher Cross goes sailing in the cosmos, 1980
 
If you’ve spent much time waiting in a room with piped-in music—in a Walgreens or Duane Reade, let’s say—you may have had occasion to wonder: just how does a person get “caught between the moon and New York City,” anyway? Wouldn’t such a person be suspended roughly 100,000 miles above the Earth’s surface, suffocating in the vacuum of deep space? Wouldn’t falling in love be the last thing on his or her mind? Yet the singer insists on telling you about the transformative experience he had among the stars and, above all, the mystical vision vouchsafed him there of the power of love: “I know it’s crazy, but it’s true,” he pleads, sounding more and more like Coleridge’s ancient mariner with every refrain.

It turns out that Christopher Cross is a true cosmonaut of inner space, the kind of performer who had to live the psychedelic nightmare of “Arthur’s Theme” before he could sing it. Last year, in an interview with songfacts.com, the singer revealed that he was frying super hard on tons of high-quality acid when he wrote his first hit, “Ride Like the Wind.” (Okay, I am probably exaggerating the quantity and quality of the dose.)

And all this time, you thought it was the least mind-expanding song in your parents’ record collection! Here’s Cross’s story of the lysergic inspiration for “Ride Like the Wind”:

Well, the interesting thing about that tune is that we had a band and we’d play every night. We were doing this Paul McCartney tune called “Nineteen Hundred And Eighty Five,” and we’d get into this big jam in the middle of it. It’s funny, I just saw McCartney and I didn’t tell him this, but in this big jam on “Nineteen Hundred And Eighty Five,” in the middle of it I did that “ba da da da, da da, da da.” I did that part.

So I thought that felt really cool. I thought it felt like it had something, some magic, so I built the song around that. That was the first part of the song, and then I built the rest around it.

It didn’t have any words. We were living in Houston at the time, and on the way down to Austin to record the songs, it was just a beautiful Texas day. I took acid. So I wrote the words on the way down from Houston to Austin on acid.

And I grew up with a lot of cowboy movies. Serials and stuff, like The Lone Ranger and these cowboy serials where they were always chasing the bad guy. And I lived in San Antonio near Mexico, so there was always this anarchistic allure about if you could get to Mexico, you could escape the authority. Also, Mexico was a place where you could go down there and drink and do all this debauchery that as a kid, you think sounds really cool. So getting to the border in Mexico was a fascinating thing to me.


And here’s the full, unexpurgated text of the cosmic cowboy epic Cross brought back from his psychedelic odyssey, which I trust the heads among you will scrutinize for hidden meanings:

It is the night
My body’s weak
I’m on the run
No time to sleep
I’ve got to ride
Ride like the wind
To be free again

And I’ve got such a long way to go
To make it to the border of Mexico
So I’ll ride like the wind
Ride like the wind

I was born the son of a lawless man
Always spoke my mind with a gun in my hand
Lived nine lives
Gunned down ten
Gonna ride like the wind

And I’ve got such a long way to go
To make it to the border of Mexico
So I’ll ride like the wind
Ride like the wind

Accused and tried and told to hang
I was nowhere in sight when the church bells rang
Never was the kind to do as I was told
Gonna ride like the wind before I get old

It is the night
My body’s weak
I’m on the run
No time to sleep
I’ve got to ride
Ride like the wind
To be free again

And I’ve got such a long way to go
To make it to the border of Mexico
So I’ll ride like the wind
Ride like the wind

Sounds like a real bummer, man. . .

To refresh your memory of “Ride Like the Wind,” take a look at this classic SCTV sketch, in which Rick Moranis shows how Michael McDonald might have recorded his backing vocals:
 

 

Posted by Oliver Hall | Discussion
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Performance art? Drugs? Both?
09.24.2014
06:24 am

Topics:
Art
Drugs

Tags:
NYC


 
So the folks over at Bowery Boogie seem sure that these four anonymous citizens are partaking of hallucinogenic drugs, but I’m not totally convinced. In these trying times of flash mobs and Improv Everywhere, one cannot discount the possibility of a staged event. Or perhaps it’s just a misunderstanding?

One could argue that the stretching lady is just doing some early-Monday-morning calisthenics! And the lady staring at the pillar could simply be quietly reflecting. The person shaking the chains could be testing their structural integrity, and the guy humping the trash can…well… nevermind, they’re probably just all on drugs.
 

 
Via Bowery Boogie

Posted by Amber Frost | Discussion
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‘80s anti-drug PSA makes you wanna snort blow off a chicken’s butt
09.23.2014
10:57 am

Topics:
Amusing
Drugs

Tags:
drugs
PSA


 
Dammit, I knew I shouldn’t have clicked play on this clip of a bizarre anti-drug PSA from the 80s. Any song titled “The Chicken Club” is a sure-fire recipe for an all day earworm. You can tell from a distance, can’t you? I’ve been humming and tappin’ my toes to this catchy lil’ tune all day. I hate myself for it.

The message I’ve taken away from this video and song is, if you don’t do drugs you can do some awesome variations of “The Roger Rabbit” / “The Cabbage Patch” and, you know… you just gotta join the “Chi-chi-chicken Club!”

Are you a “chicken” for not doing drugs? That’s a bit of a mixed message, yeah?
 

 
via Death and Taxes

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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Adorable Hunter S. Thompson / Hello Kitty sculpture
09.22.2014
08:34 am

Topics:
Amusing
Drugs

Tags:
Hunter S. Thompson
Hello Kitty


 

Let us toast to animal pleasures.—Hunter S. Thompson

I know, I know it’s a “cute animal” post on Dangerous Minds, but it’s Hello Kitty as Hunter S. Thompson! I just want to “squee” at those teeny-tiny shades “Gonzo Kitty” is wearing.

The sculpture is made by Portland-based artist Eloah whose shop on Etsy is called All Seeing Cat. “Gonzo Kitty” is selling for around $150.00.

But my real question is: does Gonzo Kitty start its day with Chivas Regal and cocaine?!

via Cherrybombed

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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‘F*ck it, I quit’: Reporter quits on air after revealing she’s pot club owner!
09.22.2014
07:45 am

Topics:
Amusing
Drugs
Television

Tags:
marijuana
cannabis


 
This clip is great: TV reporter Charlo Greene of KTVA in Alaska, quit her job live on-air after revealing she was the founder of the AK Cannabis Club.

Via the Sydney Morning Herald:

Her announcement followed a story on the Alaska Cannabis Club, a “collective” that “connects medical marijuana cardholders in need to medical marijuana cardholders with green.”

The aptly named Ms Greene revealed at the end of the story that she was the club’s owner and, as such, was left with little choice but to leave her job.

“Now everything you heard is why I, the actual owner of the Alaska Cannabis Club, will be dedicating all of my energy for fighting for freedom and fairness which begins with legalizing marijuana here in Alaska.

“And as for this job, well, not that I have a choice but, f—- it, I quit.”

Details are scant at this point and the whole clip has yet to surface, but good for her.
 

UPDATE: Greene posted a video explaining what happened on YouTube:

“Who is willing to take a stand? I’m not afraid, clearly. But if you are, I don’t judge you or any other man. Nearly a century of marijuana prohibition and stigma have stained America, the land of the free and home of the brave. But we have a chance to start taking back the right. Today it’s marijuana prohibition and, once we get that done nationally, we the people will realize that we are stronger than ever and you will feel empowered to take up what you choose to fight. Advocating for freedom and fairness should be everyone’s duty. I’m making it my life work, to uphold what America stands for truly: life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness — ideals that now need to be defended.”

Again, good for her. Passionate. Articulate. Committed to doing the right thing. I like her style!
 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Discussion
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Let Sir George Martin show you how to ‘produce’ a perfect martini
09.17.2014
05:36 am

Topics:
Drugs
Food
Music

Tags:
George Martin
martini


George and George, both lookin’ foxy
 
When I saw this little video of Sir George Martin giving martini-making lessons (an excerpt from his 2011 BBC profile documentary, Produced by George Martin), a few things struck me—besides, of course, his obvious foxyness, even at the age of eighty-goddamn-five.

1) A martini is made with gin. There is the (laughable and pale) variation, the “vodka martini,” but anyone ordering simply “a martini,” with no qualifiers, should expect gin. Complaints to the contrary will result in a face full of vermouth.

2) The bolder choice in mixing technique and the not-so-cliché garnish—always keep ‘em guessing, George!

3) Always—and this is pertinent—end with a dirty joke, as George does here. Stay charming! Prurient poetry, wit and wordplay can be the only difference between an insufferable drunk and an enchanting lush!

I hereby declare we rename this particular cocktail (with the lemon rind) the “George Martini”—who’s with me?
 

Posted by Amber Frost | Discussion
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DRUGS: Trippy photos from a ‘unique’ volume of the ‘LIFE Science Library,’ 1969
09.12.2014
11:13 am

Topics:
Art
Books
Design
Drugs

Tags:
Drugs
LIFE


The cover of Life Science Library: Drugs

Back in the 60s LIFE had a series of hardcover books—26 volumes total—called the LIFE Science Library that tackled many subjects like Mathematics, The Mind, Health and Disease, Time, Food and Nutrition and so on. One of the volumes printed in 1967 was simply titled Drugs and it gave the history of medicines and how drugs affect the human body. Now if you were to judge a book by its cover, the LIFE hardback cover on drugs looks pretty boring, right? I woulda walked right past it without a second thought! The thing is, if you’d open it up, it’s chock full of trippy eye-candy delights.

Why such a boring cover with such delicious psychedelic imagery on the inside?


 

 

 

 
More after the jump…
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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Medical Marijuana 101: Learn to navigate the coming tide of legalized weed
09.11.2014
09:36 am

Topics:
Drugs

Tags:
marijuana


 
Seven years ago, Mickey Martin was obliged to plead guilty to conspiracy after his edibles company in California was shut down. Today Martin is channeling his hard-won experience in what not to do by founding the Northeastern Institute of Cannabis in Natick, Massachusetts. As the inexorable tide of cannabis legalization sweeps the nation, it’s leaving a grey area big enough to steer an aircraft carrier through, as states have already legalized the drug, while the federal government most decidedly has not. So in states like Colorado and Washington, carrying and distributing is entirely legal—unless you happen to cross paths with a grumpy FBI agent or federal judge. The situation has led to a huge collective WTF? on the part of legalization supporters. Even as we speak, Washington has hired UCLA professor of public policy Mark Kleiman to serve as its “hemperor” to navigate the thorny legal issues and decide on a policy that does the most good for most Washingtonians.
 

 
Martin, like most observers convinced that drug policy reform is likely to continue, sees an opportunity to fill a necessary gap in the market, to educate those entering the pot retail business not to repeat his mistakes. As the Boston Globe reported, interest is significant—the school has fielded about 1,500 enrollment inquiries, some from as far away as Nepal, India, Spain, and Russia. As Martin says, “What you have is people investing heavily into these businesses and going through a competitive application process—dealing with pages of regulations from the Department of Public Health, strict security protocols, strict handling protocols—there’s just not a lot of room for error.”

As an example of the kind of “error” that can occur, consider that 9 of the 20 groups approved to open medical marijuana dispensaries in Massachusetts had their privileges revoked for reasons such as misleading profit models and a lack of support from local communities. These are the aspects of selling legal weed that the Northeastern Institute of Cannabis is designed to inform future retailers about.
 

Northeastern Institute of Cannabis founder Mickey Martin
 
Classes at the Northeastern Institute of Cannabis start on September 15th. There are 12 courses, which cost $199 each; the full program costs $1500. The classes will cover regulations, the history of pot, cultivation techniques, the science of reefer, and media relations. Cultivation classes will have to make do with video instruction feeds coming from approved dispensaries.

It’s a little weird that the Northeastern Institute of Cannabis is located in a state that has not yet embraced marijuana legalization, but Martin is confident that pot will be legalized completely in Massachusetts in 2016—as long as advocates are able to get it on the ballot.

Here’s a radio interview Martin conducted with Boston radio station WAAF:
 

 

Posted by Martin Schneider | Discussion
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