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Super-majority want Obama administration to BACK OFF legal pot states
12.10.2012
05:18 pm

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Current Events
Drugs
Politics

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A new Gallup and USA Today poll indicates that for the first time ever there is a super-majority of Americans public who want the feds to back off and let the states decide on how to deal with marijuana themselves. Via Raw Story:

A whopping 64 percent told Gallup that the federal government should not move to intervene in Colorado and Washington’s forthcoming marijuana regulations, which voters approved by wide margins on Election Day. Just 34 percent told pollsters they think the federal government should take action.

“This isn’t the first poll that shows voters want the government to let the states move forward,” Mason Tvert, communications director for the Marijuana Policy Project, told Raw Story. “We’re talking about multiple polls now, and they’re making it clear that most Americans do not want the federal government interfering in the implementation of state laws making marijuana illegal for adults.”

Pollsters segregated respondents into two groups: those in favor of keeping marijuana illegal, and those opposed. In the results, there appears to be some crossover from those who favor the drug war but also favor states rights, a key moral sticking point for many conservatives.

Interestingly, of those who still support prohibition, 43 percent said that the states should be left alone. A full 87 percent of those who oppose prohibition said they would rather the feds stay out of the states’ business.

Overall, Gallup said 48 percent of Americans think marijuana should be taxed and regulated for adult use, versus 50 percent who favor prohibition. Though that number is unchanged from Gallup’s 2011 poll on the same topic, it represents a dramatic shift from just 2005, when only about 35 percent of Americans favored legalization.

It’s starting to look like it’s high time for the Obama administration and the DoJ to step off. A slew of law-abiding, tax-paying cannabis dispensaries were closed down recently in downtown Los Angeles and Eagle Rock. It’s getting ridiculous. Furthermore, it’s clearly not politically advantageous with numbers like these to side against the will of the people, so why are they bothering?

It’s worth noting that George Bush was pretty non-committal during his two terms, when the medical marijuana movement really picked up steam. Obama needs to heed these polls and simply do the same, i.e. nothing. Letting legal cannabis flourish is a revenue enhancing move; it increases the tax base and creates new jobs. It frees up police resources, there all kinds of reasons to not make this an issue.

The main one is that no one is ever going to stop smoking pot because it’s illegal in the first place. Everyone knows this! It’s so easy for them to just do nothing.

A similar poll released by the Public Policy Polling group just last week saw similar results, with 58% saying that cannabis should be taxed and regulated similar to cigarettes and alcohol.

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Psychedelic drugs and high fashion in Asia Argento’s ‘Firmeza’
12.05.2012
12:20 pm

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Drugs
Fashion
Movies

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Firmeza , a new short film directed by Asia Argento for Ludovica Amati’s Spring/Summer collection of 2013, draws in viewers emotionally with a scenario involving an ayahuasca ceremony and then manages to slip in an entire fashion show without them realizing it. I loved it. Super clever idea to display clothing. Breathtaking visuals and cinematography.

I can’t say for sure that she actually took ayahuasca during the shooting, but knowing the Scarlet Diva, I wonder…
 

 

 

 

 
Previously on Dangerous Minds
New Kenneth Anger short film for Italian fashion house Missoni

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Timothy Leary’s video game paraphernalia discovered
11.29.2012
08:24 am

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Drugs
Games

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power glove
And he was an Adidas man, to boot
 
So the New York Public Library is archiving a giant cache of Timothy Leary’s possessions, and before you think it’s all ceramics and glass:

The Timothy Leary papers amount to 412 linear feet of letters, manuscripts, research documents, notes, legal and financial records, printed materials, photographs, video and audio tapes, CDs and DVDs, posters and flyers, and artifacts, dating from Leary’s youth in the 1920s until his death in 1997.

What’s even cooler, however, is that they just came across a little-known Nintendo component called a Power Glove. You may remember it from the movie, The Wizard, which I watched at least 5,000 times as a kid.

Power Glove was a fairly esoteric, expensive, and rare precursor to the Wii, so not a lot of people had one. This is probably a good thing, because I understand the technology wasn’t quite developed yet to make it any more than a cumbersome bother to use. Regardless, it’s fun (though not surprising) to know that Leary jumped on the video game gadgetry bandwagon early.
 

Posted by Amber Frost | Leave a comment
Elvis Died For Somebody’s Sins But Not Mine
11.26.2012
11:54 am

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Books
Drugs
Heroes
History
Music
Politics
Pop Culture
Punk

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What a great title, right?

Just in time for the Aztec calendar to run out (and let’s not forget Christmas, of course) comes Elvis Died For Somebody’s Sins But Not Mine, a collection of Mick Farren’s primal ‘up against the wall, motherfucker’ style of rock and roll polemics. One man’s literary life spent railing against the machine lives between these covers. The hidden history of the twentieth century and beyond. He was there and you weren’t. Listen up, children!

Within these pages you’ll meet the likes of Frank Zappa, Johnny Cash, Chuck Berry and Gore Vidal, and steam open correspondence between the author and Pete Townshend. And, much more importantly, you’re about to go one-on-one with a world-class raconteur… If this kind of mess-around seems like your cup of meat, then prepare your relaxant of choice, kick back and dig in. The greasy ’oodlums are at your door.”

—Charles Shaar Murray (from his foreword)

About the Author:
Mick Farren was born on a wet night at the end of World War II. During his long, occasionally hallucinatory, and sometimes hell-raising career, he has published twenty-two novels (including The DNA Cowboys Trilogy). He has also published more than a dozen non-fiction works on topics that range from music to drugs to conspiracy theory (including Give The Anarchist A Cigarette). An unreconstructed rock & roller, he continues to function as a recording artist and songwriter. He has also made detours into anarcho-agitprop like editing the underground newspaper IT, and defending both his liberty and the comic book Nasty Tales through a protracted obscenity trail at the Old Bailey.

He was part of what is now called (by some) the NME golden age, during which time he helped explain punk to people who still thought Rick Wakeman had merit. As a lyricist, Mick’s words have been sung by Metallica, Motorhead, Hawkwind, Brother Wayne Kramer, the Royal Crown Revue, and the Pink Fairies.

Publisher Headpress are offering a very limited stamped, numbered and signed deluxe edition hardback of Elvis Died For Somebody’s Sins But Not Mine, only available from their website, and for the special price of £28 until December 3. There’s also an unsigned hardback edition selling £20, but I sez get yours autographed. Why regret not getting it signed?

And just in case you were wondering, here is a list of the drugs found in Elvis’‘s body when he died, included in the book as a piece of found poetry:

Codeine—at a concentration ten times higher than the toxic level

Morphine—possible metabolite of codeine

Methaqualone—Quaalude, above toxic level

Diazepam—Valium

Diazepam metabolite

Ethinamate—Valmid

Ethchlorvynol—Placidyl

Amobarbital—Amytal

Pentobarbital—Nembutal

Pentobarbital—Carbrital

Meperidine—Demerol

Phenyltoloxamine—Sinutab (a decongestant)

Below, Mick Farren talks about the underground press in London with John Peel in 1967.
 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
One Black Beauty too many: The night Larry Hagman drove Keith Moon to rehab
11.24.2012
01:41 am

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Drugs
Movies
Music
Television

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Larry Hagman in “Stardust.”
 
In this excerpt from British TV show The Real…, Larry Hagman spares no details in describing the time he drove Keith Moon to rehab after the drummer over-indulged in Black Beauties (amphetamine). Moon and Hagman were friends, having originally met on the set of Stardust, a 1973 movie about the Brit rock business starring David Essex.
 

 
Thanks to Charles Lieurance.

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
‘Build This Bong: Instructions and Diagrams for 40 Bongs, Pipes, and Hookahs’
11.20.2012
09:36 am

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Drugs

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It’s not too early to start Christmas shopping for that special craftsman in your life! While many instructions for DIY drug paraphernalia designs are available on the Internet, rarely will you find such a well-articulated and attractively diagrammed collection of field-tested models. Build This Bong: Instructions and Diagrams for 40 Bongs, Pipes, and Hookahs is so simple, even a child could make their own cannabis vaporizer!

The Amazon reviews are glowing:

Warning: Do not attempt while stoned, or your craft will look like crap. Lots of fun craft to make your custom water pipes and smoking accessories all just a Lowes stop away. Great for lovers of Do-It-Yourself projects

A great book for DIY enthusiasts, the projects were not hard at all. Most of them only took a day or two to build. I managed to create 23 of them so far and sold some on Ebay.

See? You don’t even need to be a smoker to enjoy bong-artistry; and you can even start your own business!

Give the gift of American ingenuity, resourcefulness and DIY drug paraphernalia this holiday season!

Posted by Amber Frost | Leave a comment
1967: Documentary on ‘The Summer of Love’

sixties_summer_of_love_1967
 
The joyful hedonism of the 1960s was in part a response to the trauma to the Second World War. The same way the twenties swung after the first great conflagration. And like that decade, it was primarily the white, upwardly mobile, metropolitan, middle class that enjoyed the sex, the drugs and the rock ‘n’ roll.

London may have been swinging in 1967, but for the rest of the country not a lot changed. It would take until the 1970s for most of the country to get a hint of what London experienced. The most important changes, apart from pop music and American TV shows, were the legalization abortion and de-criminalization of homosexual acts between consenting adults - both of which set the scene for bigger and more radical changes in the 1970s.

Yet, as so many of the media are Baby Boomers, the love of all things sixties ensures TV fills its schedules with documentaries on that legendary decade. 1967: The Summer of Love is better than most, as it covers the cultural, social, and political changes that the decade brought. With contributions form Germaine Greer, Donovan, Nigel Havers, Bill Wyman, John Birt and Mary Quant, together with some excellent color archive, this documentary is a cut-above the usual retro-vision.
 

 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Alice Cooper: Certificate of Insanity
11.10.2012
07:52 pm

Topics:
Amusing
Drugs
Music
Pop Culture

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Alice_Cooper_Certificate_of_Insanity
 
The Alice Cooper Certificate of Insanity (issued by the School for the Hopelessly Insane) was a limited edition document given away free with Cooper’s album From the Inside, in 1978. Whether this was a recommendation or, a comment on the quality of the record, was never made clear. What is known is that rather like the source for Malcolm Lowry’s excellent novella Lunar Caustic, Cooper’s album was similarly inspired by the singer’s stint in a New York sanitarium for his alcoholism.

From the Inside was co-written with Elton John’s song-writing partner, Bernie Taupin.
 

 
Previously on Dangerous Minds

Through a Glass Darkly: Malcolm Lowry, Booze, Literature and Writing


 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Legalized marijuana in Washington and Colorado: Not if Obama can help it
11.08.2012
10:00 am

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Drugs
Politics

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Admit it, Obama voters, this is the kinda thing you expected Mitt Romney to do if he got into office. What did this take, all of around 36-hours, to get floated to the press?

Maybe I should have voted for (unimpressive) Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson (I probably agree with him on about 25% of the issues, around the same percentage as I agree with Obama, anyway). On election day it was more appealing to me to record a “fuck you” vote to the Republicans than to make a different sort of protest vote, but Obama is already making me regret that, as tiny a protest as that would have been, just TWO DAYS later!

Via Reuters:

Votes making Colorado and Washington the first U.S. states to legalize marijuana for recreational use could be short-lived victories for pot backers because the federal government will fight them, two former U.S. drug control officials said on Wednesday.

They said the federal government could sue to block parts of the measures or send threatening letters to marijuana shops, followed up by street-level clampdowns similar to those targeting medical marijuana dispensaries the government suspects are fronts for drug traffickers.

“This is a symbolic victory for (legalization) advocates, but it will be short-lived,” Kevin Sabet, a former adviser to the Obama administration’s drug czar, told reporters.

“They are facing an uphill battle with implementing this, in the face of ... presidential opposition and in the face of federal enforcement opposition,” Sabet said.

—snip—

Ian Millhiser, senior constitutional policy analyst with the left-leaning Center for American Progress, said the federal government, even if it sues to challenge the Colorado and Washington initiatives, cannot force police in those states to arrest people for marijuana infractions.

“If I were Barack Obama, I would look at this and say I would rather have young voters with me,” Millhiser said.

Damn, straight, Ian. I’d take it a step further and say that NO ONE was waiting to hear how Obama was going to crack down on… states’ rights.

If his DOJ does nothing about this, no one will even notice (Keep in mind that the Bush administration did very, very little to curb the explosive growth in California’s cannabis trade). Now they’re just going to get mad. Fuck Obama. What’s so “Forward” about this shit?

I want my vote back!

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
‘Go Ask Alice’: Televised brown acid from 1973
10.29.2012
05:54 pm

Topics:
Drugs
Hysteria
Movies

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One has to wonder how many of the multitude of drug scare films produced in the 1960s and early 70s actually managed to propagate the bad trips they were warning us about. Almost every depiction of the LSD experience committed to film has been negative, including movies made by so-called “heads.” Check out The Trip, Easy Rider and Psche-Out to see how Hollywood hipsters, who should have known better, demonized psychedelics. Easy Rider comes close to replicating an LSD trip but man is it spooky in that graveyard.

I am still waiting for the movie that reveals the truth about LSD and how it triggered one of the greatest leaps in consciousness since the invention of film itself. But that’s a whole other article for another time.

Right now, let’s peer into the dark side of psychedelia according to people who know jackshit about the subject at hand. Go Ask Alice was a 1973 TV movie based on a book of the same name. The book, like the movie, is a bunch of reactionary hokum that more than likely created more bummers than it prevented. Back in the day, teenagers were constantly bombarded with anti-drug propaganda and as a result went into the acid experience expecting the worst. And in many cases, the negative programming became a self-fulfilling prophecy. The idea of “set and setting” (be in the right mindset and in the right environment) as emphasized by Timothy Leary was basically ignored while TV and movies continued freaking kids out. I would venture to say that most bad trips were the result of bad pre-programming. But instead of teaching people how to take drugs responsibly, society chose the alternative of keeping people in the dark. I had the good fortune of reading Leary’s “The Psychedelic Experience” and various other texts on LSD before taking my first trip and knew that even the worst acid trips could simply be ridden out by breathing deeply and staying calm in the face of the cosmic storm.

It’s easy to laugh at Go Ask Alice now, but at the time it was broadcast on the American airwaves the movie probably did a significant amount of damage by promoting misinformation and outright lies. Unlike the fabricated Alices of the media world, when I was 16 years old and peaking on 250 mics of Sandoz I didn’t flip out when the telephone starting melting in my hand - a sensual, pulsating blob of red plastic. I kept talking, telling my mother how much I wanted her to share the lovely experience I was having in that moment. Yes, my first trip was transformative, profound, ecstatic. Go ask Marc. I’ll tell you all about it.

Go Ask Alice features William Shatner, Andy Griffith and future coke-fiend MacKenzie Phillips in an outrageously alarmist but entertaining exercise in ignorance. The shitty version of The Jefferson Airplane’s “White Rabbit” sets the tone for what’s to come.
 

 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
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