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Game of Microphones: Hip-hop/‘Game of Thrones’ mash-ups
12.27.2016
11:23 am

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Amusing
Fashion
Hip-hop
Music

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Tupac.
 
London-based artist Madina produces Hip-Hop designs for posters, pins, T-shirts and sweaters. He was the designer behind the best-selling GoldenEra Hip-Hop stamp collection—previously featured on DM.

Now Madina has launched a range of clothes and prints titled Game of Microphones featuring a mashup between the Kings and Queens of Hip-Hop and George R. R. Martin’s The Game of Thrones.

Check out the full set here.
 
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Biggie Smalls.
 
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Ice Cube.
 
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Full set on a T-shirt.
 
More ‘Game of Microphones,’ after the jump…
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Big Eyes: Gorgeous Margaret Keane scarves that won’t break the bank
12.21.2016
09:32 am

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Art
Fashion

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The Stray $200.00
 
This is one of those “I did not know these exist, but I’m majorly happy they do” moments. American artist Margaret Keane, creator of the “big-eyed waifs” paintings and drawings, has a line of drop-dead gorgeous scarves. I wish I would have known about these sooner, as I’m sure there’s probably someone on your holiday list as well who would have totally flipped over owning one of these beauties. What a great gift to give, but especially to get!

Maybe they can do a rush delivery?

The scarves are made in Italy and the fabric is Micromodal, “a natural fiber made from vegetable raw materials: this creates a smooth surface and allows the scarf to maintain a bright color and shine over time.”

And I’m sure they’ll become collector’s items, selling for inflated prices on eBay in short order. Don’t forget that people of the future will consider Keane to be one of the greatest artists in history. Woody Allen predicted that in 1973’s Sleeper.

The shorter scarves range from $100 - $200. The longer, dress-like scarves sell for around $250. Not too bad considering just how beautiful they are. I put prices and links below each image.


Wistful $250.00
 

The First Grail $250.00
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Blondie, Lou Reed, David Bowie, Andy Warhol & more rendered in gorgeous knitwear
12.16.2016
01:58 pm

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Art
Fashion
Heroes

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Blondie ‘Rapture’ sweater by Mary Adams.
 
I think it’s safe to say that for many people Lou Reed’s 1972 album Transformer was a life changing kind of record.Transformer was very much influenced by Reed’s life changing relationship with Andy Warhol. Warhol even directly inspired one of Transformer‘s best numbers, “Vicious.” According to Reed Andy had requested that he pen a tune about a “vicious” kind of person. When Reed asked Warhol to clarify his request, Andy responded by saying “Oh, you know, like I hit you with a flower.” Reed wrote Andy’s response down verbatim and the lyric “You hit me with a flower” would become part of the song.

When it comes to the influence that Transformer had on Mary Adams, the wildly talented clothing designer and sweater maker whose work is featured in this post, we can look to the iconic cover of the album that features an out-of-focus photograph of Reed taken by Mick Rock. One of the first sweaters Adams ever made was based on Rock’s photograph and her obsession with Reed would lead her to create an entire line of high-end knitwear inspired by the pioneering musician. In fact Adams’ company Small Town Girl took its name from lyrics to a song found on Reed’s much vilified collaboration with Metallica, 2011’s Lulu, “Brandenburg Gate.” Adams got her start working as a seamstress and costume designer for The Royal Canadian Ballet and Opera as well was what was likely another influential experience for her—a dreamy souding gig as the “wardrobe mistress” for the original Rocky Horror Show stage production in Australia in 1975. When she wasn’t busy doing that, she was regularly selling her sweaters at the popular outdoor Paddington Market in Sydney.

Many of Adams’ designs feature pop art images, some of which are derived from famous works by Andy Warhol who is also nicely represented on much of Adams’ knitwear. Other notable wooly famous faces include Reed’s wife Laurie Anderson, Transformer‘s producer David Bowie, Liza Minnelli, the recently departed Leonard Cohen, and Patti Smith. I’m not exactly going out on a limb here by describing Adams’ work as exquisite. She and her collaborators hand loom each sweater using pure Australian wool and then each piece is finished by Adams by hand. So it’s not hard to understand why her wearable works of art will run you anywhere from $45 for a head scarf to $470 for a Blondie “Eat to the Beat”-themed sweater which you can see below. If after checking out the images in this post you are filled with a strong desire to have one of your own, more information on how to do that is available on Adams’ Small Town Girl website.
 

‘Lou Reed’ sweater coat.
 

David Bowie ‘Ziggy Stardust’ sweater.
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
A skull and crossbones hair bun cover
12.12.2016
11:59 am

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Fashion

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This is actually a clever design that I may incorporate into my own wardrobe (when appropriate, of course): a wire skull and crossbones bun cover by Kyle Wyatt of Etsy shop Wyre Art. I think you would need pretty long hair for this to work as the skull itself appears wide and big.

This look ain’t for no tiny man buns! It’s best that way, if you ask me.

Unfortunately, it appears the shop is currently sold out. But you can probably contact Wyre Art directly and see if they have any available and/or are able to produce more. It would certainly make for an excellent holiday gift. I know I’d dig one of these.


 
via Like Cool

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
You won’t be able to unsee this hideous bad taste underwear from the 1970s
12.12.2016
10:36 am

Topics:
Advertising
Amusing
Fashion

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Everyone’s done shit they are embarrassed by. You know the kinda of stuff—that late night drunken text that you thought was oh so witty—but only got you a restraining order. Or maybe the time you turned up as Hitler at the fancy dress party for Hymie’s bar mitzvah. Or, that Christmas party when you woke up in bed with your girlfriend’s mother. No? Maybe that was just me then….?

Anyhow….

That embarrassing shit we’ve all done—that we’re still so sickeningly ashamed about—well, that was the seventies… Except the seventies didn’t give a fuck. The seventies wore all that bad taste stuff out in public like it was the Nobel-fucking-Peace Prize for ending war, starvation and world poverty.

And you know something—I gotta be honest—I kinda respect that attitude of not giving a fuck about what anyone else thinks. Just enough to tip the hat to the boys and girls who were brave enough to wear these cheesy (maybe not the right word to use here…), shockingly bad taste underwear.

British Bulldog produced a range of seventies underwear that was “funtawear.” There was no subtlety here. Just saucy innuendo with straplines like “Slippery when wet,” “The Big One,” “Rub Here,” and “No Shortage….”  Someone, somewhere obviously thought such humor would be a big turn on when stripping off in front of a hot date.

And why the hell not.
 
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Have a peek at more saucy underpants, after the jump…

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Sad-looking Lou Reed sweater is sad because it costs $2,730
12.08.2016
01:10 pm

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Amusing
Fashion
Heroes

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A spendy sweater made by LA-based company Enfants Riches Déprimés
 
And yes, I do realize that this image of Lou Reed is taken from the cover of his 1972 album Transformer however, you really can’t deny that Reed looks rather sad to be a part of a sweater that costs more than most monthly mortgage payments. You might call it, at $2,730, a “steal.”

In fact when you translate the name of the LA-based company that makes the garment Enfants Riches Déprimés from French to English it becomes “Depressed Rich Kids.” Which further reinforces the appearance of despair on poor Lou’s 100% merino wool face, don’t it? If the Lou sweater is a bit too spendy for you, then the same image also appears on a coat from les Enfants that will run you (just) a cool $1,160.

The Enfants Riches Déprimés brand is wildly popular with young Hollywood types whose parents pay all their bills.

Their customer base routinely shell out all kind of ridiculous cash for t-shirts complete with holes that cost $378, and jackets like this one named for Holden Caulfield from The Catcher in the Rye that retails for $800. Speaking of being depressed, Enfants even makes a $7000 cashmere noose which while posh enough for the jet-set to use to end it all, isn’t likely to be strong enough to use to actually hang yourself with. Too bad.
 

‘Lou Reed’ coat.
 

An image of the $7000 cashmere noose by Enfants Riches Déprimés .

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
East Germany’s leading fashion magazine, Sibylle
12.07.2016
01:33 pm

Topics:
Fashion
History

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May-Jun. 1981
 
One of the contradictory artifacts of the Communist bloc was the arena of clothing design and fashion. Indeed, one might even say that in any self-respecting socialist paradise, the entire notion of physical beauty would always be suspect: After all, visual attractiveness by definition involves itself with appearances over inner substance. But that didn’t mean that Eastern Europe was just going to cede the territory to the capitalists entirely. The Communist bloc had to compete with the West on many fronts, and one of them was the objectification of women.

The best-known fashion magazine in East Germany a.k.a. the German Democratic Republic (GDR) was called Sibylle. It was in print from 1956 until 1995, and it was named after its founder Sibylle Gerstner. The magazine was a bimonthly, appearing six times a year, and its modest run of 200,000 would regularly sell out, implying a demand among East German women for increased coverage of fashion topics.
 

Sibylle Gerstner
 
The question naturally arises whether how a socialist version of Vogue (people at the time were aware of that exact comparison) differed from the Western original. Certainly the Sibylle covers emphasize a more natural look and eschew materialistic or otherwise illusionistic makeup and other trappings—but it could also be that we’re reading into it, a bit; it’s possible that the covers are more similar than different. The article on Sibylle in German Wikipedia features the intriguing sentence “Auf die frauenzeitschrifttypischen Ratgeberteile wurde bewusst verzichtet,” which means that the typical women’s advice columns and similar content was consciously rejected. In the socialist East German paradise, women are not to be condescended to in matters of the heart!

For some reason the lion’s share of the covers available on German eBay are from the 1960s and the early 1980s but very little in between. I’m quite taken by the latter period but I’ll also show a few from the earlier span as well.
 

Jan.-Feb. 1981
 

Mar.-Apr. 1981
 

Jul.-Aug. 1981
 
Much more after the jump…...

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Just in time for the holidays: A HUGE realistic-looking beetle earring!
12.06.2016
09:34 am

Topics:
Animals
Fashion

Tags:


 
Still don’t know what to get your loved one or friend for the holidays? Well if they don’t suffer from insectophobia, why not get him or her this realistic looking beetle earring? It’s a Dynastinae or rhinoceros beetle to be exact which are a subfamily of the scarab beetle family.

As freaky as this earring looks, I must admit I kinda dig it. I’ve never seen anything quite like it before. It certainly is a fashion statement, wouldn’t you say? (That statement being: “Look at me!”)

The beetle earring is available at Japan Trend Shop for $47 here.


 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
OMG, the ‘sexy’ full-body crotch-showcasing wolf onesie has arrived!
11.21.2016
10:57 am

Topics:
Amusing
Animals
Fashion

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Remember those “sexy” crotch wolf head’s underwear I blogged about a few months ago? Well, some evil genius decided to take it to a whole ‘nother level by creating this “sexy” wolf’s head onesie. If you notice, the crotch is stil, er, accentuated. Dear lord…

It’s available here for $54.94.


 
via Boing Boing

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Arsenic and old lace: When women’s clothing could actually kill you
11.17.2016
10:13 am

Topics:
Design
Fashion
History

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A child’s dress dyed green with arsenic, 1838-1843.
 
Ah, the color green. Generally associated with good luck and four-leaf fucking clovers the color green was anything but good luck back in the 1800s. During the entire century and into the 1900s arsenic was used in all kinds of everyday products from wallpaper to paint as well as women’s clothing and beauty products. Yikes.

Originally known as “Scheele Green” in 1814 German company Wilhelm Dye and White Lead Company decided to try to modify the paint by adding arsenic and verdigris (a blue/green color that is made by using copper or brass to oxidize it). The new color was dubbed “emerald green” and was an overnight smash. It was soon being used for all kinds of things including dying dresses, shoes and flower hair accessories for women, among countless other products too numerous to mention. When the actual “recipe” for the dye was published in 1822 distributors attempted to temper the color as well as change its name so customers would keep using products that would eventually kill many of them.

Due to their constant contact with the deadly dye, seamstresses and makers of flower hair accessories were especially susceptible to the dangers of getting up close and personal with arsenic and would pay for it by developing horrific lesions on their skin or face. And they were the lucky ones. Death from arsenic poisoning was preceded by vomit that was a distinct shade of green, foaming at the mouth and convulsions. All things considered, as bad as things are now, they really seemed a whole lot worse during a time when looking good could literally kill you. I’ve included many images in this post of vintage garments, shoes and other items that drastically cut the average life-expectancy of a lot of ladies and anyone who liked cake because guess what? Arsenic was also used to color cake icing back in the 1800s! If this kind of historical weirdness is your kind of thing I highly recommend picking up the book Fashion Victims: The Dangers of Dress Past and Present by Alison Matthews David.
 

The effect of constant contact with arsenic on the hands of perhaps a seamstress or flower maker.
 

Boots dyed with arsenic, mid-1800s.
 
More deadly clothing after the jump…

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
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