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There’s a Cthulhu ski mask that’s only $4.23!
11.07.2016
10:51 am

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Fashion

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Boing Boing hipped me to this really inexpensive Cthulhu-style ski mask that’s selling here for only $4.23. Depending on the color you choose, the price does change slightly. I’m blogging about the grey one and that’s currently at $4.23. Now I can’t vouch for the quality of these masks. I do not own one. However, there are over 100 customer reviews giving the masks between four and five stars. Just 4% of the reviews have it at one star.

I thought I’d throw this one out there since it’s getting cold out, it’s cheap and it could make for a great (cheap!) Christmas gift.

In his house at R’lyeh, dead Cthulhu waits dreaming of a ski mask like this one.


 

 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Tattoo Tights: Decorate your legs without permanently inking your skin
11.07.2016
09:45 am

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Amusing
Art
Fashion

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If you’ve ever considered getting a tattoo on your legs but were a tad concerned that maybe one day you’d tire of its design and would be forever marked with a dubious nautical illustration or a fast-fading love heart, or the name of a long gone ex. Well, fret no more as there is a range of fashion accessories called Tattoo Tights that allows you to change your tattoos as easily as changing your pantyhose.

Tattoo Tights is the idea of Silvana Ilieva—an artist who is passionate about creating “unique, hand-painted items with a soul.” Silvana produces individual pantyhose with tattoo motifs in her studio in Sofia, Bulgaria. Each pair of pantyhose are hand-painted using Silvana’s secret technique which incorporates ancient Asian inking methods.

So far, Silvana has produced around 100 individual tattoo designs for her range of Tattoo Tights—which she sells online. These are more than just beautiful hosiery but delightful works of art to be exhibited on sorry, on top of your skin. More details here.
 
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More beautiful ‘tattooed tights,’ after the jump…

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
‘The Story of Skinhead’ is must-see TV
11.04.2016
04:14 pm

Topics:
Fashion
Race

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My personal experience with skinheads—a “run in” you might call it—was brief, lasting mere minutes, but it was a memorable occasion…

The year was 1983 and I was a 17-year-old lovesick dickhead living in a south London squat who wanted to impress this super gorgeous goth chick I knew. My choice of attire has always been more to the preppy side, but I realized that if I was to have any chance with this beautifully morbid creature, I needed to switch up my look from Brooks Brothers to something a lil’ more Peter Murphy. So I hennaed my hair black and spiked it up with hairspray, wore eyeliner and makeup and donned a black trenchcoat. The object of my affections was not in the least impressed with my new look, but that’s beside the point.

Later that night, right after the pubs had shut, I was going home, alone, rejected and dejected, on the London subway, and feeling like an idiot. The goth look I’d worn for all of maybe five hours just wasn’t me. When the train stopped at Leicester Square, a massive rush of people crushed into the train, including a gang of eight very large, very fearsome, very mean and very fucking drunk skinheads. They were with their girlfriends, who were also wearing boots and braces. All had the “Chelsea cut” that female skins wore. The girls seemed even harder than their boyfriends, and just as ugly.

One of the female skins noticed me and pointed out the “goth poofter,” suggesting that her boyfriend and his pals should kick my faggoty ass. They jeered at me, brandished their fists at me and let me—and every other passenger in that subway car—know that they were going to beat me within an inch of my life. If I was lucky. Suffice to say that my life might’ve changed course dramatically that night had things turned out differently.

My first instinct was to piss in my pants or start crying like a baby begging them for mercy, but I decided that hoping for some cops to magically appear and save my quivering hide was probably a better strategy. Then the train conductor announced over the intercom system that we’d be stopping at the next station, and that the train we were on was being taken out of commission so all the passengers needed to exit and wait on the platform for the next train to arrive.

This was not necessarily good news, I thought.

I mentioned how crowded the train was. When this positively bursting-at-the-seams car cleared out a bit, I made to exit in the opposite direction from where the skinheads had been taunting me when the biggest and meanest one of them stomped right over and drew his arm back to wallop me with a haymaker. Had his punch connected, I’ve no doubt that he would have knocked me unconscious and probably broken several bones in my face. But he didn’t connect. He barely grazed my forehead and I felt his fist rush by me like a gust of wind as it just barely missed cracking my skull into several pieces.

The platform at the station was even more densely packed than the train had been. I needed to find some cops—and was frantically trying to push my way through the sardines, followed closely behind by this drunken, bloodthirsty skinhead wolfpack—but there were no London bobbies anywhere to be found. I kept moving, hoping something would happen when the train turned up. Standing still and waiting for them to catch up to me wasn’t an option, and there were several yards between us. I plowed onwards.

Keep reading after the jump…

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Hilarious & cringeworthy knitted sweaters of the 1980s
11.04.2016
09:42 am

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Books
Fashion

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It’s November, and the temperature in my neighborhood in northern Ohio reached 77 just two days ago. It felt like the start of September really, just a lovely day to be outside. Not at all cold.

One of the benefits of the balmy winters brought on by catastrophic climate change is that there’s no risk someone will trick us into donning one of the absolutely amazing sweaters featured in a remarkable book of knitting designs from the fashionable 1980s. Wit Knits, which presented “lively and original” knitted sweater suggestions by George Hostler and Gyles Brandreth, came out in 1986, and the photographs showing off the finished designs are simply jaw-dropping in their silliness.
 

 
There’s a website devoted to these pictures, but its proprietor, rightly sensing that the visual impact of these doozies is the primary appeal, therefore “won’t post patterns, buy the book if you want to make them.” Harrumph. The book is, like everything else, available on Amazon.

The really peculiar thing about Wit Knits is that virtually all of the models are well-known figures from 1980s British television. I don’t know how Hostler and Brandreth were able to sucker such famous personages into agreeing to be involved with this, but perhaps it was simply a paid gig like any other. Maybe they got to keep the sweaters?

For instance: I can remember watching, on WNET Channel 13 in New York back around when this book came out, a delightful British show called Good Neighbors (it was known as The Good Life in the U.K.), and Richard Briers, here wearing the light blue sweater with the “wee Scottie” on it, was the lead actor on that show. Meanwhile, Joanna Lumley—then perhaps best known for her stint in The New Avengers, who later became an icon of decadence in Ab Fab—here is shown wearing a ridiculous sweater with a horsey; she also has a different one with what is most likely an owl on it. Lizzie Webb, who presented morning exercise routines on TV, is wearing a sweater with a kittykat on it. Most of the people here are like that.
 

 

 
Much more after the jump…......

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Retro Rubberist: Vintage photos of latex and leather fetish wear from ‘AtomAge’ magazine
11.01.2016
09:18 am

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Fashion
Sex

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Pages from a vintage issue of ‘AtomAge’ magazine from the 2010 book ‘Dressing for Pleasure in Rubber, Vinyl & Leather: The Best of Atomage 1972-1980.’
 
Back in 2010 the book Dressing for Pleasure in Rubber, Vinyl & Leather: The Best of Atomage 1972-1980 took on the weighty task of detailing the career of remarkable English designer John Sutcliffe and his leather and latex fetish magazine (often referred to as the “fetish bible”) AtomAge. Part of the book’s title is taken from the fantastic 1977 documentary film of the same name by director John Samson, Dressing for Pleasure.

Sutcliffe started making his dangerous latex and leather getups back in the late 1950s after his marriage fell apart and the pioneering kinky clothing maker found himself struggling to stay afloat. After making a few risque outfits out of rubber and leather Sutcliff found himself so busy that he opened a shop on the popular Drury Lane. He made the infamous leather jumpsuit worn by Marianne Faithfull in the 1968 film Girl on a Motorcycle and his subversive attire would soon be carried on the racks of Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood’s SEX boutique on King’s Road.

By the time the first issue of AtomAge hit the shelves in 1972 Sutcliffe was already wildly busy filling orders from his rabid customer base. Originally intended to be a vehicle for Sutcliffe to advertise his clothing AtomAge quickly became a real page-turning publication full of articles, photos of readers wearing his designs, and of course erotic photos of sexy models wearing Sutcliff’s fetish wear, often while engaged in BDSM style role play. Sadly it was the boundary-pushing and at times sadomasochistic photographs that would contribute to the demise of the magazine. Specifically after a book published by AtomAge titled The Story of Gerda found its way into the hands of the authorities. The cops thought that the book gave them just cause to raid AtomAge’s office and take possession of everything on site. The painful end-result of all this madness (in addition to numerous fines assessed to Sutcliff) resulted in every unsold copy of AtomAge being destroyed.

Despite this sad setback Sutcliff (who passed away at his desk a few years after the Gerda debacle essentially ended his career) ended up blazing the trail for other fetish-fueled magazines such as Modern Life Illustrated (which was already putting out their own issues in the mid-60s), Latex Maid, and Rubber Quarterly  leaving us a fantastic legacy of erotic and subversive imagery. I’ve got a load of photos in this post from Dressing for Pleasure as well as a few other latex/leather erotic magazines—most of which are delightfully NSFW. If this gets your heart racing then I highly suggest checking out the equally NSFW site that has cataloged AtomAge’s entire print run.
 

‘AtomAge’ number 23, 1979.
 

A page from ‘AtomAge’ magazine.
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
Punk rock knitting: These cult figure sweaters are easily the most amazing sweaters money can buy
10.27.2016
12:27 pm

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Art
Fashion

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Kraftwerk sweater by by Amimono Horinouchi
 
I’m not the sort of person to really care all that much about, or even notice, expert knitting or “crafting” or embroidery or anything remotely like that. This very sentence will probably mark my first time using the word “felted” and it might very well be the last. I’ve got no business being in a Hobby Lobby. I’m not putting it down, but it’s not my area of interest.

That was until I saw the jaw-dropping sweaters made by Amimono Horinouchi, a 49-year-old knitwear artiste based in Tokyo. THIS is where my own esoteric interests hit the Venn diagram with wool sweaters hard. When I saw the Kraftwerk sweater, my eyes practically bugged out—they’re all so amazing: Debbie Harry, Ramones, Bowie, YMO—but what could possibly top that insane Kraftwerk sweater???

And then I saw the one on his website of Throbbing Gristle-era Genesis P-Orridge and was completely and utterly floored.

Amimono Horinouchi‘s knitwear might be “fashion,” but it is also art.

According to his Etsy page, which has prices in dollars, the bags sell for less than $200, and the sweaters go for about $600 which I think is a great bargain. He also takes commissions and will even do a sweater of your beloved dog or cat. I’d love to see him working in large tapestries. Incredible!

Follow Amimono Horinouchi on Twitter.
 

Genesis P-Orridge
 

Debbie Harry
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
How to make poop Emoji hair
10.26.2016
11:15 am

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Amusing
Fashion

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If you have no idea what you’re going to be for Halloween yet, don’t fret because have I got the costume for you! Why not dress your tresses as a poop emoji? There’s a step-by-step video to show you how to get the exact look.

In the video they dye the woman’s hair brown. If you don’t already have long brown hair, I say buy a cheap brown wig. Don’t dye your hair. This is supposed to easy for Pete’s sake! If you have Amazon Prime you can have a cheapo brown wig delivered to your house within two days. If not, I’m sure any Halloween store will still have some in stock. The eyes also look a bit too time consuming to make. Just buy some giant googly eyes and glue the pupils in place. That’s my advice, anyway. I like my costumes easy.

In the end your hair will look like… shit.

Don’t say I’ve never given you any last minute Halloween ideas or tips!

 
via Nerdcore

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
For Sale: The Private Life of Marilyn Monroe
10.26.2016
11:15 am

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Design
Fashion
Movies
R.I.P.
Superstar

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This is what it comes to when we die: a wardrobe full of clothes, shoes, some scattered notes, several albums of photographs and a few good memories to be shared by others.

When Marilyn Monroe died on August 5th 1962, she left behind a shitload of personal effects from which we can learn more about her private life than any biography or old movie magazine interview could ever reveal. This November, Julien’s Auctions are selling some of Marilyn’s personal belongings from the collections of David Gainsborough-Roberts, the estate of Lee Strasberg and the estate of Frieda Hull. The lots up for grabs include clothes, costumes, jewelry, photographs, memorabilia, private journals, and poetry.

Julien’s shortlists the sale as follows:

Highlights from Marilyn Monroe Property From The Collection of David Gainsborough-Roberts include a sheer black beaded and sequined dress worn by Monroe in her Golden Globe winning role Sugar Kane as she crooned “I’m Through With Love” in the award winning 1959 film Some Like it Hot; an elaborate embellished stage gown worn by Monroe as she sang “After You Get What You Want You Don’t Want It” in the 1953 comedy There’s No Business Like Show Business which was designed by one of Marilyn’s all-time favorite designers, William Travilla; a pink linen halter wiggle dress designed for Monroe by Dorothy Jenkins for the 1953 thriller Niagara

The Marilyn Monroe Property From The Estate of Lee Strasberg collection includes one of just a few pieces of fine jewelry ever owned by Monroe: a ladies platinum and diamond cocktail watch with movement reading “Blancpain, Rayvill Watch Co. 17 Jewels, Unadjusted Switzerland.” Other highlights in this collection include a beautiful 1950’s brown alligator ladies handbag from I. Magnin & Co. with matching accessories; a grey pony handbag from Mexico still containing three one peso bills; a number of other handbags, fur coats and stoles; a stunning ladies minaudière with the original box, featuring multiple compartments containing loose powder with cotton buffer, mirror, comb, two mercury dimes, eight Phillip Morris cigarettes and a tube of used Revlon lipstick in “Bachelor’s Carnation” with a date of 1947, a virtual time capsule of one of the star’s nights out on the town.

Déjà vu Property From The Life and Career of Marilyn Monroe includes personal items originally sold at Christie’s 1999 and Julien’s Auctions’ 2005 Property From The Estate of Marilyn Monroe auctions and other consignors.

Among these incredible treasures are many of Marilyn’s intimate writings which reveal her frustrations with acting, her fear of being unable to love another, and various poems including one which might be about suicidal feelings:

Stones on the walk,
every color there is
I stare down at you
like a horizon
The space—air is between us beckoning
and I am many stories up
my feet frightened
as I grasp towards you.

The auction takes place over three days on November 17th, 18th and 19th, Los Angeles in what would have been Marilyn’s ninetieth year. View the catalogs here and full details of the auctions here.
 
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More Marilyn Monroe memorabilia auction, after the jump…

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
‘Do you have this octopus in my size?’ The surreal shoes sculptures of Costa Magarakis
10.25.2016
09:49 am

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Amusing
Art
Design
Fashion

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These boots aren’t made for walking—they’re sculptures designed by Costa Magarakis—a Greek-born artist who is now based in “a Shoe Galaxy some ‘step years’ away…”

Costa makes shoe sculptures because he believes every “shoe has its own personality and a story to tell.” His influences come from “everywhere” but the Victorian era is his favorite.

His sculptures are produced thru a long and laborious process in which each shoe is made “suitable for molding.” Once the old boot is softened up, Costa adds fiberglass resin and a variety of diverse materials including bronze, glass, wood, paint, fantasy and love.

The finished sculptures cost between $500 and $1,200+ each and can be purchased via Costa’s Etsy page—where he trades under the name SpiderJelly.

Check out more of Costa’s work on his website.
 
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More surreal shoe sculptures, after the jump…
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Horrifying knitted masks for Halloween
10.19.2016
09:58 am

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Fashion

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We’re getting really close to Halloween and there’s just enough time left to recreate some of these knitted and crochet masks. Many of them are vintage and one-of-a-kind, so you’re probably going to have to make your own mask or hire someone who can do it for you and not ask any questions. Consider this a lookbook. A lookbook for psychopaths, perhaps, but still a lookbook, nevertheless…

What I dig most about the knitted mask thing is that you can just plop one of these puppies on for Halloween and not worry about the rest of your costume. DONE. The mask is sinister enough on its own!

When someone asks “What are you supposed to be?” just tell ‘em: “A walking trigger warning.”


 

via Etsy
 
More mask madness after the jump…

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
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