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‘Holy cosplay, Batman!’ Exact replica of the 1966 mask Adam West wore
01.06.2014
12:56 pm

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Art
Fashion
Heroes
Pop Culture
Television

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Cool as fuck—but bloody expensive at a whopping $1500—replica Batman mask modeled after the one Adam West wore on the 1966 TV show.

It is the only available cowl still being made from the original fabric which has been custom dyed to match a color sample from the dye house used on the show. The pattern was created by a professional pattern maker using a original cowl (from the Hardeman collection) The lightweight fiberglass shell was created using a plaster cast taken from an original as a base. Even the eyebrow paint color has been Pantone matched to the original.

Adam West refers to our Cowl as a “work of art” and is a proud owner of one of our replicas.

It’s available to purchase on Etsy by WilliamsStudio2. According to the write-up, you need to “act now as fabric is in limited supply.”

Via Nerdcore

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Black sheep’s wool cut to look exactly like a prize-winning poodle
12.18.2013
12:29 pm

Topics:
Animals
Art
Fashion
Pop Culture

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You may have already seen this fantastical black sheep trimmed like a poodle, but I haven’t, so I thought I’d share with you all in case you missed it, too. Because, well, it’s a black sheep groomed to look just like a goddamned poodle!

The project was by Lernert & Sander for the Dutch newspaper De Volkskrant. According to the groomer Marieke Hollander “it was a lot of work on the day of the photoshoot. It took 12 hours, including the grooming, to finally get the right pictures.”

Is it me, or does the sheep look slightly embarrassed by its new ‘do? I hope this doesn’t turn into some sort of new hipster pet trend.

Via Mudfooted and with thanks to Adam Parfrey!

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Knitted ‘Alien’ Facehugger to keep your face warm on cold winter nights
12.10.2013
11:29 am

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Amusing
Fashion
Movies

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I guess it could keep your face warm during cold winter days, too, but maybe this is more of a “night piece.” Anyway, Etsy shop Knitrocious designed this lovely handmade Alien Facehugger to keep yer face all toasty and cozy. I like how the eyeholes are perfectly placed.

It’s a $150 + shipping here.

Previously on Dangerous Minds:

Suck on that: ‘Alien’ facehugger bong
 
Via Nerdcore

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Horrifying full body spandex Santa Claus suit
12.06.2013
11:53 am

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Amusing
Fashion

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This just ain’t right… Here’s a skintight spandex Santa Claus bodysuit that can be yours… It’s available to purchase at Rubie’s Costume Company. I can’t find the price for this scary-as-shit leotard on their website, but someone needs to use this in a Santa horror flick, stat!

Via Laughing Squid

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Got a big leotard budget? This Bowie-inspired fashion line may be for you!
11.21.2013
06:45 pm

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Fashion

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Bowie fashion
Halloween Jack was a real cool cat. Meow.
 
You might remember our recent post on the Twin Peaks-themed clothing line, but I’m way more impressed by Suckers Apparel‘s David Bowie-themed line! They’re super cute, and I could totally do with that Halloween Jack leotard (if I had that kind of scratch).
 
Bowie fashion
 
Bowie fashion
Inspired by the Thin White Duke look
 
Bowie fashion
 
Bowie fashion
 
Bowie fashion
Inspired by Bowie’s “gold circle” makeup
 
Bowie fashion
 
Bowie apparel
Inspired by Bowie’s anisocoria
 
Via Suckers Apparel

Posted by Amber Frost | Leave a comment
Milo goes to the North Pole: The Descendents’ annual Christmas sweater is here
11.19.2013
08:51 pm

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Amusing
Fashion
Music

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The Ugly Christmas Sweater Party is fast becoming one of the most annoying rites of American whiteness, but lately, thanks to one of your favorite bands, you can give that new tradition the finger. If you have to go to one, why not go in your Descendents Christmas Sweater Sweatshirt?

GOOD NEWS DESCENDENTS FANS! You guys have been asking for it, and now we have it! We are proud to present the 2013 Holiday Sweater. The Descendents started this craze a few years ago and you guys cant get enough! As always, these are only here for a limited time so grab one while you can! Happy Holidays!

They’ve been making these for a few years now, but this year, they’re taking pre-orders so that fewer fans get shut out of these limited items. You can order yours from Kings Road.

Now rock out.
 

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Leave a comment
‘Twin Peaks’-themed clothing
11.18.2013
10:36 am

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Fashion
Movies
Pop Culture
Television

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Fire Walk With Me - Dress

Suckers Apparel has a Twin Peaks-themed clothing line. A wee bit expensive for my tastes, but kind of fun nonetheless. There’s also “Who Killed Laura,” “8Bit Lodge,” and “Log Lady” leggings available for purchase.
 

Laura - Dress
 

Welcome To Twin Peaks - Dress
 

Smoking In The Girls Room - Cape
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
At long last, the invisible bike helmet is here
11.12.2013
10:46 am

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Design
Fashion
Science/Tech

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bike helmet
 
I regard bike helmets simultaneously with contempt and reverence. Reverence because I have flipped over my handlebars - unhelmeted - and gone skull-to-pavement in such a way that the temple arm of my eyeglasses ended up embedded in my forehead. I still have that scar. I could have majorly fucked myself up for life that day, and absolutely should have been wearing a helmet, there is no question about that at all - those things have saved some of my friends lives, and I have never been so reckless as to go without since. Contempt because, well, every complaint about the goddamn things has a point. They’re heavy, bulky and uncomfortable. They mat your hair down, which can legitimately be a problem if you’re commuting to a job where appearances count. And there will always be a tremendous temptation in how great the breeze feels when you ride bare-headed. Helmets rob you of a lot of the sense of freedom in the open-air experience that’s such an important part of cycling’s appeal.

But now, two Swedish design students have invented a helmetless helmet. It has its basis in a familiar automotive technology, but I will not describe it to you in any further detail. The video below has an amazing reveal that I don’t wish to spoil. I believe you will find yourself wondering - as I did - why nobody has thought of this before.
 

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Leave a comment
Colorful sports uniforms for hip artists like Warhol and Basquiat
11.11.2013
10:27 am

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Fashion
Sports

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Andy Warhol, number 28
Andy Warhol, number 28
 
I know perfectly well that these shirts are little more than a quick grab at fashion trendiness, but I like ‘em anyway. The whole idea of a French firm assigning American sports jerseys to various iconic creative people (none of whom would probably be able to tell apart a catcher’s mitt from a hockey stick) seems pretty witty to me.

These come from a French fashion outfit called LES (ART)ISTS, who say that these designs were inspired by “American football jerseys,” which seems fair enough.

The regular T-shirts are €45 ($60), and the flannel versions are €99 ($133). Actually, they seem to have only the b/w version (such as the KAWS one) on their site. I prefer the more playful and colorful ones, they strike me as much more clever and engaging.

The odds are that the numbers were chosen more or less at random, but I can’t help reading meanings in (busted, I’m a sports fan). WARHOL 23 makes sense for anyone who knows who Michael Jordan is [Update: DM reader “ThatGuy” points out that Warhol is 28 on all three shirts], and beyond that, I admire the use of rather high numbers. In baseball high numbers are generally used for scrubs who don’t play, the types who make it to spring training and then don’t make the squad. If we’re talking football, the numbers have specific meanings—for instance, a number in the 80s means you’re a wide receiver, anywhere from 50 to 79 means you’re either a lineman or a linebacker, and so on.
 
Keith Haring, number 58
Keith Haring, number 58
 
Haruki Murakami, number 62
Takashi Murakami, number 62
 
Damien Hirst, number 75
Damien Hirst, number 75
 
Jean-Michel Basquiat, number 60
Jean-Michel Basquiat, number 60
 
See the rest of the jerseys after the jump…...
 

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Lost Manhattan: Amazing home movie footage of New York City in the 1970s
11.10.2013
12:03 pm

Topics:
Fashion
History

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While much of what we see in this bittersweet time capsule still stands, there are scenes of a once vital part of New York City that has vanished. I refer to the footage of the Garment District. Hard to believe that only a few decades ago Manhattan was one of the fashion production capitols of the world. Clothing was actually being made in giant lofts not far from Times Square. It was an amazing scene of streets cluttered with migrant workers pushing rolling racks hung with freshly-made dresses that swayed seductively as they passed pastrami-scented delis jammed with kibitzing garmentos. Sidewalks teemed with Hasidic men in funereal three-piece suits and black hats made of rabbit fur while high above in the cathedrals of fashion sewing machines chugged metallically. Jazzily. Music of the shears.They call them Singers for a reason.

It’s all gone now. A whole American industry and culture disappeared like dinosaurs in the tar pits of progress. A song no longer sung.

I bought many fine sharkskin suits from factories in the Garment Center in the late Seventies. My favorite one by far had super narrow lapels, 13 inch pegs and was lime green with silk paisley lining. Years later, I ripped that suit to shreds on the stage of The Ritz during a set with my band. I was drunk and I regret having destroyed that lovely piece of American craftsmanship - handmade by some old cat with a sewing machine in a darkened loft surrounded by hundreds of yards of shimmering silk.

I turned my obsession with vintage threads into a business. I spent my days in the Garment District going through warehouses of unsold merchandise or digging through the stockrooms of stores like Bond’s (which later became a music venue where The Clash would have their famous seventeen day residency). I scored skinny ties at $15 a dozen and sold them to boutiques catering to punks and new wavers. I found factories that made women’s leather gloves, pop art handbags, plastic costume jewelry in neon colors and day-glow fishnet stockings. I bought em all, blew off the dust, and made bucks from clients like Trash And Vaudeville and Patricia Field. Before I knew it, I had a 2000 square foot space in the farther reaches of the West Village packed with low couture grooviness. I was getting visits from the owners of stores in London and Paris. They wanted American style made in America. The sleek pimped-out suits, cockroach killers with Cuban heels and white Naugahyde go-go boots made in the Bronx, Queens or Manhattan were far hipper than the shit strolling down the runways of Europe.

Believe it or not, there were hundreds of these small factories and wholesalers in NYC. On 39th street I found an ancient showroom/warehouse stocked with hundreds of dozens of wraparound sunglasses - the kind Marcello Mastroianni wore in 8 1/2. They ended up on the shelves of some of the most expensive stores on Madison Avenue. That score alone covered my rent on East 27th street for an entire year. I was a high school dropout turned instant fashion mogul.

The fruit of American labor didn’t stop on Fashion Avenue. Downtown there were huge storefronts filled with close-out merchandise. On Chambers Street I discovered more than a thousand pairs of patent leather fuck-me pumps made by a company called Sapphire and bought every trashy one of them for a buck a pair. Most of those candy-colored high heels ended up in Fiorucci along with a few hundred paper dresses with op-art prints I found at a junk seller near Wall Street. Manhattan was crazy mad with this kind of stuff back then and it was usually pretty cheap.

It was possible to dress cool for next to nothing in clothing made right where we lived. We were the fashion equivalent of locavores. You could dress sharp on the proceeds of an unemployment check and still have enough cash to pay the landlord, buy some blow and get drunk at the Mudd Club. But more importantly, fashion could identify who you were in the same way as a uniform tells people what branch of the military you’re in. Yeah, we wanted to look cool but we also wanted to make a statement. In that respect, fashion could be political. It could shake up the status quo. Outside of New York, L.A. or London, dressing in a certain way could come at a price. A sharp-dressed man or woman could stir up some shit in the hinterlands. It could actually be dangerous.

I got into fashion not for the money. Money was a by-product of doing something I dug. I got into it because I wanted to outfit the future rockers of America with gear that would align them with a musical movement that, at the time, was shaking shit up and was something I was passionate about. When I started getting orders for skinny ties and wraparound shades from stores in places like Wyoming and Nebraska I felt part of a revolution. I was selling to small stores in small towns where a kid wearing a skinny tie and spiked hair was taking a chance by expressing who he was on the inside by simply wearing a tie two inches less wide than what was considered acceptable. In 2013 when everyone including your mother has a tattoo, it’s hard to imagine that a tie or a pair of sunglasses could be seen as radical, but they were.  For three bucks a kid in the middle of nowhere could buy a piece of gear that immediately set them apart from the pack. They could announce to the world that they were different while they took the time to figure out just what that meant. Even if it meant nothing more than loving The Ramones or DEVO.

Like love, rock will tear us apart… tear us apart from the humdrum realities of a life where chances are never taken. Fashion, in its purest form, is as clear an expression of intent or philosophy as a poem or song or painting. In 1966, at the age of 15, I pierced both of my ears and stuck two gold hoops in them, scrawled a peace sign on the back of my jean jacket and walked through a shopping mall in Virginia with my pet chicken on a leash. I had no idea what the fuck I was doing I just knew that I had to do it. Someone in that suburban hellhole had to. Sometimes your personal revolution starts with a fashion statement. Sometimes all it takes is a chicken on a dog leash and a pair of earrings.

And it’s still ongoing. I was in a Hot Topic in New Mexico not long ago and I saw a group of Hispanic kids buying Cure and Smiths tee-shirts and a few pairs of bondage pants. It was a big move for them. There are parts of Albuquerque where shit like that can still you get you fucked up. You saw Breaking Bad, right? But these young cats were making the leap out of themselves and declaring what they loved and what they wanted to stand for. I walked over to them, they were probably no older than 16, and simply said “cool” and that was enough to let them know that we were on the same team even though there were was more than a 40 year difference in our ages. I left it at that, though I was tempted to tell them my chicken story and that the people who made the bondage pants they were buying were my best friends and have made millions selling punk rock clothing to kids all across America since 1975. Purists will question the commodification of rebellion. To which I say “fuck that shit!” Punk has always been as much about fashion as it has music. Not every kid can be in a band but every kid can look like he’s in a band. And that’s a good fucking start. 

Anyway, here’s some way cool footage of New City when it was funky, sexy and more than a little bit crazy. These were the days when New York City made more than just money. It made stuff you could hold in your hand, put on your body and tell your story through.

From the YouTube description:

This film of New York City streets, parks, and people was made in the early 1970s by amateur filmmaker Irving Schneider. Includes scenes of Brooklyn Heights, Washington Square and Greenwich Village, the Garment District, Times Square and 42nd Street, and Central Park. Music by John Coltrane.

 

 
Thanks to Jahn Xavier for turning me on to the video.

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
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