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‘One of Us:’ Stunning portraits of origami masks
11.04.2013
10:39 am

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Art
Design
Fashion

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oneofus5
 
Designer Francesca Lombardi has created a menagerie of haunting origami animal masks, which have been photographed in beautiful black and white portraits by fashion photographer Giacomo Favilla for a series called “One of Us.”

Via the excellent arts blog Yatzer:

Titled ‘‘One of Us’’, the project consists of black and white portraits of people sitting in a vintage armchair, while wearing beautiful origami masks. With the intention creating an impression of an imaginary world, where animal and human natures blend together as one, each mask has been laboriously folded over and over again to resemble a different animal. Be the animal a puma, a rabbit, a crocodile or a cat – they all take their turn in ‘‘being the face,’’ be that temporarily, of a person sitting to have their photo taken where their most striking feature is the fact that they have no eyes – they are in fact stylised blindfolds in the shape of animals.

 
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DM readers in London might like to know that the series will be exhibited at The Book Club beginning on November 28th. Or 28 November, if you prefer.
 
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Posted by Ron Kretsch | Leave a comment
Too soon?: Lou Reed tribute shirt goes hilariously wrong
10.31.2013
04:53 pm

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Fashion
Music

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It’s clear from some of the other shirts this Etsy user has for sale that this is the work of a morbid and highly twisted prankster, but I have to admit - I laughed. And I kind of want one. Putting a picture of David Bowie on a Lou Reed R.I.P. shirt like that is a pretty great joke.

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Leave a comment
Shreddies: Fart-filtering underwear with Zorflex® activated carbon material
10.21.2013
03:26 pm

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Amusing
Fashion

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Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
1930s nose jobs
10.14.2013
01:43 pm

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Art
Fashion
History

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I’ve always had a mild fascination with the art of plastic surgery. I’ve never had any cosmetic plastic surgery myself, but I’ve got nothing against someone who has if it makes that person feel better about themselves. Extreme plastic surgery—Jocelyn Wildenstein-level surgical augmentation—is a whole other story, but then again, if that’s what makes her happy, who I am to say… anything?

But what I really find interesting about these “vintage” 1930s nose jobs is how well they’re done. Apparently back then, plastic surgeons were simply better. Instead of carving out the perfect little “one size fits all” Hollywood-approved button nose for everyone, the surgeons gave their patients noses that fit their faces.


 

 
Via Retronaut

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Camel toe underwear, new from Japan!
10.14.2013
12:23 pm

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Amusing
Fashion

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Straight from Japan, here’s some deliberate “camel toe” underwear to fulfill all your camel toe wearin’ needs. Why? I don’t know. Just go with it.

Anyway, I can’t find these anywhere online to purchase, but I guess you could probably just make a pair on your own (if this is what floats your boat). Doesn’t look too difficult.

Via WFMU

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Fashion Victims Unite: Manchester’s late ‘70s—early ‘80s Perry Boys subculture
10.07.2013
04:54 pm

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Fashion
Music

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perryboysabroad
 
Manchester and Salford, England’s Perry Boys (a.k.a. Town Boys, “real” mods) and Perry Girls were a late ‘70s-’early ‘80s cultural movement that embraced expensive continental sportswear, Tamla Motown and glam rock, auburn-rinsed wedge haircuts, and in some cases, love of Manchester United and shoplifting across Europe. They were the regional rivals to Liverpool’s Scallys and pre-cursors to Boys, The Nameless Thing, and Casuals. But for many young boys, being a Perry was all about the clothes rather than violence, petty theft, and soccer hooliganism.

Ian Hough’s amazing books, Perry Boys: The Casual Gangs of Manchester and Salford and Perry Boys Abroad: The Ones That Got Away, are part-memoir and part cultural history but both are low on photos. Perry Boys, despite having roots in the Northern Soul subculture, were not associated with only one specific musical genre, like the slightly later New Romantics. As a result they were not as carefully documented visually as other subcultures, which is a real shame.

Hough describes the Perry Boy look:

Bowie and Bryan Ferry were the dual lighthouses that served to guide kids’ blinkered coolness into a new harbour. Then, they slowly emerged, from Northern Soul and football roots, to coalesce in a new look that seemed so right; Clarke’s Polyveldt, Hush Puppies and Adidas Kick were the featureless tadpoles from which numerous forms sprang. Peter Werth polos, burgundy chunky sweaters and Fred Perries were the shirts. Levis and Lois were the jean. The hairstyle was the wedge.

—snip—

…side-partings and old-fashioned short-back-ands-sides became more popular. The hair at the nape of the neck became subject to a particularly intense work-up…the fringe was grown low over one eye, and layered around the side, describing a horizontal line across the ear… An absolute lack of sideboards was a priority.

Amoeba blogger Eric Brightwell included a few more iconic clothing brands in his description:

In addition to Fred Perry, the Town Boys (as they were also sometimes known) also favored (preferably burgundy-colored) Peter Werth shirts, Fila Borgs, raglan sleeve shirts, Harrington jackets, Sergio Tacchini and later replica football kits. Preferred trousers included Levi’s 501s or Sta-Prest, Lee corduroys, and Lois jeans. Popular shoes included Adidas Stan Smith, docksiders, Kios, and Kickers. Other approved labels included Aitch,French Connection, FU, and Second Image.

Fred Perry traditional pique tennis shirts were as sought after as Izod Lacoste polo shirts among the upper middle class in the U.S. The mods in London had been wearing them since the early ‘60s, as had skinheads, suedeheads, rude boys and punks in Manchester and Salford, who had worn the black-champagne-champagne version. But the shirt acquired a legion of unlikely poster boys in the late ‘70s.

Perry Boys were notorious for attending Manchester United matches abroad and shoplifting luxury brand clothing and jewelry from upscale boutiques. They were also willing to get blood on those expensive shirts. Hough describes the Perry Boys’ reputation for violence, which was immortalized in The Fall’s Mark E. Smith’s song “City Hobgoblins”: 

People feared Perries, but they were a rare sight in the mid-70s, favouring night-life over day, Soul over Glam-Rock and music over football. Despite the obscurity, they were feared as nasty lads, very insular and ready to strike at anyone who looked at them, full stop.

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Native Mancunian Morrissey had nothing but negative memories of the movement when he discussed them in a Melody Maker interview in 1986:

They’re still there. Trouble is, now they’re all 33 and they’re still doing the same thing. The memories I have of being trapped in Piccadilly Bus Station while waiting for the all-night bus or being chased across Piccadilly Gardens by some 13-year-old Perry from Collyhurst wielding a Stanley Knife. Even when I was on the bus I would be petrified because I would always be accosted. They were the most vicious people. They would smack you in the mouth and ask you what you were looking at after.

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The impeccably well-dressed Johnny Marr credited the Perries for having a sharp style sense. In a 1984 Record Mirror interview Marr was asked “Who is The Smiths’ favourite fashion designer?” His reply was:

Every Perry Boy who’s ever walked around the centre of Manchester. They are really important to me. When I went to France and New York and all those places, I expected to see all these amazingly dressed people but, honestly, the Perry Boys in Manchester have got so much more class than anybody else in the world. I stole all my fashion ideas from them.

Last year he recalled the Perry Boy style affectionately:

This shirt that I’m wearing now – my sister and I used to wear these shirts in the late ‘70s. These guys called the Perry Boys used to wear them. They always made quite an impression on me. In the Smiths, when I used to wear a sheepskin coat and these necklaces over a sweater and sweaters around my waist — that all came from the Perry Girls. That’s something I saw girls on the street wearing. They weren’t very rock and roll. They were sort of street. Rock ‘n roll in the late ‘70s in the UK – there were a lot of students involved. It was kind of an intellectual thing. I’m talking about working-class people who considered music press to be pretentious. They were probably right. I always liked and admired their style even though I was into music press and rock ‘n roll.

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Drawing of a Perry Boy by author Ian Hough

Blogger Eric Brightwell listed several diverse U.K. and American bands as Perry favorites:

As with all the best youth subcultures, music played a central role for Perries. The Perry soundtrack included Disco, Soul, Roxy Music, David Bowie and neo-psychedelic post-punk bands. Favored American neo-psychedelic bands included Athens’s R.E.M., Milwaukee’s Plasticland, Rhode Island’s Plan 9, St. Paul’s Hüsker Dü and Los Angeles’s Paisley Underground (The Dream Syndicate,Green on Red, Rain Parade, and The Three O’Clock) as well as Liverpool’s Echo & the Bunnymen and Teardrop Explodes. Local post-Punk bands with Perry Boy elements in their audience included Joy Division, The Chameleons, Crispy Ambulance, Magazine and Vibrant Thigh. And they liked The Cramps. Tellingly, few if any bands from London made the grade.

Pips Disco in Manchester, behind the cathedral, had five themed dance floors, including the the Bowie Room, the Roxy Room, where you were encouraged to “dress smart,” according to the admission tickets, and a Perry Room. Although there were no self-identified Perry bands, Stockholm Monsters had Perry Boys (and one Perry Girl) among its personnel, as did Happy Mondays, Hungry Sox, The Stone Roses, and Inspiral Carpets.

The co-existing ‘70s Mod Revival look outlived the Perries, and other fashion-oriented subcultures eclipsed them in the ‘80s, but that Perry wedge haircut was seen on several New Romantic, synth-pop, and New Wave bands for years (Japan, Spandau Ballet, Soft Cell, The Human League, early Duran Duran). And the perennial Bryan Ferry “flick” haircut will never, ever die.

Don Letts’ 2012 Fred Perry Subculture series, Mods:

More after the jump…

Posted by Kimberly J. Bright | Leave a comment
Kansai Yamamoto’s fantastic outfits for David Bowie’s ‘Aladdin Sane’ tour
10.01.2013
11:11 am

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Fashion
Music

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Bowie Yamamoto
 
Kansai Yamamoto was one of the most important “Japanese Contemporary” fashion designers who arrived on the scene in the 1970s, His primary accomplishment as a young designer was to appropriate the traditional Japanese garb of the past—kimonos, samurai armor, and so forth—and from them create enchanting modern variations.

Bowie has said that Yamamoto was “100 per cent responsible for the Ziggy haircut and colour,” saying, according to Peter Doggett’s book The Man Who Sold the World: David Bowie and the 1970s, “He had just unleashed all the Kabuki- and Noh-inspired clothes on London, and one of his models had the Kanuki lion’s mane on her head, this bright red thing.” 

According to Cameron Silve’s Decades: A Century of Fashion, Yamamoto said of Bowie, “He has an unusual face, don’t you think? He’s neither man nor woman, if you see what I mean, which suited me as a designer because most of my clothes are for either sex.”

For his Aladdin Sane tour, Bowie sought Yamamoto out for some wacked-out space-age costumery, and Yamamoto produced the following looks:
 
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Here’s Bowie with the designer:
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Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Selling ‘rebellion’: 1977 TV segment on The Damned bemoans the commercialization of punk
09.30.2013
11:47 am

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Fashion
Punk

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I love watching old commentary on punk rock as a social phenomenon, especially in the staid, square format of conventional TV news. When they get it wrong, it’s usually an attempt at sensationalism, moralist hysteria or some such “kids these days” sentiment. Old people panicking (or attempting to incite panic) about youth culture is almost always amusing in retrospect.

But it’s even more of a trip when they get it right.

This spot isn’t a probing exposé on The Damned (nor does it have the best visual quality, sorry), but the segment actually gives a fairly astute assessment of punk rock as an exploitable business opportunity. In addition to giving a decent description of punk’s appeal to working-class British kids, the piece is genuinely insightful about the relationships between capitalism, identity, youth, and “authenticity.” You can actually hear concern in the narrator’s oh-so-sober-and-respectable tone as he bemoans that “it is now possible to buy a gold safety pin for up to $100 to go with a hand-ripped t-shirt, that sells for $16.”

And those are 1977 dollars, folks! It stinks that the vid cuts out early, because it’s honestly kind of heartwarming to hear the narrator differentiate between fashion-plates and “true believers.” There’s a sweetness to this sort of mildly cynical anti-capitalist commentary; the idea that art shouldn’t have to be contaminated by profit motives is a noble one, and one that I still kind of believe in, after a few drinks. As absurd as it is, that Urban Outfitters jacket is nothing new. Art, rebellion, and youth culture get marketed as soon as the opportunistic catch a whiff, and all we can do is remember it’s the natural order of things, have a laugh, and try not to roll our eyes too hard.
 

Posted by Amber Frost | Leave a comment
Someone decided to have a little bit of Photoshop fun with that Urban Outfitters’ ‘punk’ jacket
09.25.2013
07:06 pm

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Amusing
Fashion

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If Urban Outfitters was selling this extraordinary leather jacket, they’d sell bazillions! Guaranteed!

The Enya logo is an especially nice touch.

Image by Andy Kelly on Twitter. 

Previously on Dangerous Minds:

‘Vintage’ punk rock rebellion, yours for just $375 at Urban Outfitters

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Trash with Class: John Waters’ muse Divine immortalized in $1300 knitted sweaters
09.24.2013
10:54 am

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Fashion
Movies
Pop Culture
Queer
Superstar

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While I love the above knitted Divine sweater (I’d probably wear it) by designer James Long, I hate the one below. The sleeves! Oh gawd those hideous sleeves!

And when I say “I’d probably wear it,” I’d probably wear it if I had an extra $1300 to burn ‘cause that’s how much these “high-fashion” sweaters cost. Holy crap!
 

 
Via WOW

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
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