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Strangely trippy 1970s animated commercial for Levi’s Jeans
12.08.2011
11:55 pm

Topics:
Advertorial
Fashion
Television

Tags:
1970s
Commercial
Levis

levi
 
In the 1960s and 70s, Levi’s promoted their products with a series of offbeat commercials, many of which had a lysergic spin.

In this ad, psychedelia meets film noir when a stranger in a pair of trippy polyester jeans comes to town.

Ken Nordine narrates.
 

 

Previously on DM: Trippy TV commercials

Posted by Marc Campbell | Discussion
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Pepper Spray Cop-themed Christmas sweater
12.04.2011
12:17 pm

Topics:
Amusing
Current Events
Fashion

Tags:
pepper spray cop


 
Abbie Heppe wearing her homemade Christmas pepper spraying-attire at the G4 holiday party. 

(via The Daily What)

 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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Vintage ad for Hip Pocket Record earrings
12.03.2011
01:38 pm

Topics:
Amusing
Fashion

Tags:
earrings
Hip Pocket Records


 
I wonder if they stretched your earlobes? Seems a bit heavy, eh?

(via KMFW)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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Kate Moss as Ziggy Stardust in French Vogue
11.30.2011
07:07 pm

Topics:
Fashion
Music

Tags:
David Bowie
Kate Moss


 
Below, “Moss Garden” from Heroes:
 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Discussion
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Flipper t-shirt for sale at Forever 21
11.30.2011
01:06 pm

Topics:
Amusing
Fashion
Music

Tags:
Flipper
Forever 21


 
Oh dear. Forever 21 is selling the “homemade” Kurt Cobain version of a Flipper t-shirt made popular when Cobain sported his on Saturday Night Live in 1992. There’s even a “Ha, Ha, Ha” t-shirt I found on their site, although, I doubt it has anything to do with Flipper. 

To me, Flipper was always the band who I thought of as making the best soundtrack for sniffing glue. I wonder what people who’d buy this product at Forever 21 think about Flipper?
 

 
Below, Flipper’s “Ha Ha Ha.”

 

 
Thank you, Jason Diamond and Vol. 1 Brooklyn

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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Paris fashions of 1926: Dreamy hand-tinted film footage
11.29.2011
08:41 pm

Topics:
Art
Fashion
Movies

Tags:


 
The beauty in this film footage is not so much in the fashions but in the hand-tinting of the celluloid itself.

Paris fashions of 1926
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Discussion
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Cheshire Cat Snuggie
11.28.2011
12:30 pm

Topics:
Amusing
Fashion

Tags:
Alice in Wonderland
Snuggie
Cheshire Cat


 
Man I loathe Snuggies, but this Cheshire Cat from Tim Burton’s Alice in Wonderland I found on Amazon for $44.99 is rather… evil looking? Is an evil looking Snuggie even possible?

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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Michael Fish: Apocalyptic fashion from 1969

michael_fish_1969
 
Fashion designer Michael Fish created some of the most memorable outfits of the 1960s and 1970s, most famously the “men’s dress” as worn by Mick Jagger and David Bowie. His designs were also graced the films Modesty Blaise and Performance.

Here is Mr Fish as he introduces a brief taster of his 1969 collection, from German TV’s Aktuell.
 

 
With thanks to Maria Salavessa Hormigo Guimil
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
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‘Five Years In New York That Changed Music Forever’


Jeff Salen of Tuff Darts and Talking Heads’ David Byrne at CBGB, 1976. Photo: Robert Spencer.
 
It has been said that when a city is in decline the arts flourish. I don’t know who said it or when it was said or if anyone actually said it at all. It’s one of those things that sounds true and feels true and when I say it people tend to agree, whether it’s true or not. It certainly seemed true when I arrived with my band in New York City in 1977 to play a Monday night gig at CBGB.

Crawling out of an Econoline van into the humidly dense New York night and having a fistful of Bowery cesspool stench sucker punch me was like being greeted by a Welcome Wagon full of decaying dog dicks. I liked it. I took in a lungful of the jaundiced air and knew immediately that my Muse was there somewhere…stuck like a moth in the viscous Manhattan murk.

The asshole smell of downtown NYC was exactly the kind of reality check I needed after spending six years languishing at the foot of the Rocky Mountains in Boulder, Colorado. I had arrived in 1970s Manhattan ready to have my world dismembered like a frog in anatomy class. I offered my neck to the city’s rusty scalpel with only a bottle of Jack Daniel’s and a bindle of blow to deaden the pain. 25 years later, I came out of surgery a changed man. And I have the scars to prove it. Lovely scars that you can count to determine my age.

In the first few years of living in NYC, I spent most my nights hanging at Max’s, CBGB, Danceteria, The Peppermint Lounge, The Mudd Club, Hurrah’s and countless other clubs soaking in the glorious sounds of local bands like The Patti Smith Group, The Ramones, Blondie, Talking Heads, Suicide, Tuff Darts, Mink DeVille, The Contortions, Steel Tips, The Dictators, The Mumps… many of whom were gaining international reputations for rescuing rock and roll from the corporate death grip of a dying music industry and from its own artistic stagnation. This was not a commercial strategy, it was something closer to a collective religious epiphany. Poets, painters and philosophers were adding guitars and amplifiers to their arsenals of typewriters, journals and canvas to further expand their medium of self-expression and resurrect a pop culture that had shot its wad at the tail end of the Sixties.

While my main interest was with what was happening in the punk clubs, there were major musical tremors snaking throughout Manhattan,The Bronx and Spanish Harlem. Jazz, rap, disco and Latin music were all drawing from some deep well of inspiration in a city that, on the surface, seemed to be collapsing in on itself. The economy, infrastructure and racial division were crushing Gotham like Godzilla-sized pigeons with restless leg syndrome.

Darkness breeds light and pockets of artists, of every color and cultural background, were conjuring all kinds of magic. And the magic was converging and intermingling in a melting pot, a Hessian crucible, in which alchemical beats, rhythms and song were being transmuted into healing vibrations balancing Gotham’s gloomy Kali Yuga yang into Shakti-powered yin transforming the tortured cries of the city into ecstatic utterance you could dance to, fuck to and get high to. Music was the wave that kept the city from tanking. As the garbage piled up on the streets and triumphant rats were raising flags on mounds of rotting debris like rodent versions of the Marines ascending Iwo Jima, glittering disco balls gaily revolved like tin foil prayer wheels in Studio 54 and downtown The Ramones were generating more energy on the Bowery than Con Edison and the psychotic barker from the Crazy Eddie commercials combined. Music provided the make-up, the blush and mascara that gave New York City the appearance of still being alive.

Will Hermes’ exhilarating new book Love Goes To Buildings On Fire: Five Years In New York That Changed Music Forever captures the energy and excitement of New York’s music scene from 1973 to 1978 in all its multitudinous forms. It is richly detailed, never dull, and exhaustively researched. I came to the book knowing most of what there is to know about Manhattan’s punk scene and as someone who was there at the time was pleased to see that Hermes (who was also there) manages to make it all come alive again. This is not a dull slog through familiar turf. Herme’s prose pulses with a rock and roll heart. He loves what he’s writing about. And he’s writing about much more than just what falls within my frame of reference. He sees and connects dots between various scenes creating a kind of musical mandala. From the lofts of downtown avant-garde jazz composers like Philip Glass to the South Bronx and the roots of rap with Kool Herc to disco’s inception spun off the turntables of Nicky Siano to The Fania All-Stars’ explosive sets at the Cheetah Club, Hermes is like a human Google map, giving us the God’s eye view and zooming in right down to the graffiti in the bathroom.

Today, things seems as bleak as they did in New York City during the 1970s. There’s a sense of hopelessness, a sense that things are getting out of control. But underneath the despair there is a subway-like rumbling, a rhythm, a beat, a sensation that something is moving and about to surface and it could be a train entering the station or it could be something like music, something pulling us all together in a movement that thrusts forward into the future and will not be denied. I’ve seen what the power of music can do. I saw it in the Sixties and I saw it again in the Seventies. And right now my eyes are wide open and ready to see it again.

Love Goes To Buildings On Fire is that fine kind of book that takes you backwards and forward at the same time. Will Hermes reminds us that music matters and every revolution, every movement, every cultural and political upheaval, creates its own soundtrack. What will ours be this time around?

Here’s a video mix inspired by Will’s book which includes some seminal songs that came out of New York City in the 1970s.

1. “Jet Boy” - The New York Dolls   2. “Piss Factory” - Patti Smith   3. “X-Offender” Blondie   4. “Born To Lose” - The Heartbreakers    5. “SuperRappin’” - Grandmaster Flash   6. “Darrio” - Kid Creole   7. “The Mexican” - Babe Ruth   8. “Pop Your Funk” - Arthur Russell
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Discussion
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Cheeky fad: ‘Woman Invents Dimple Machine,’ 1936
11.11.2011
11:05 am

Topics:
Fashion

Tags:
Dimple Machine
plastic surgery
Isabella Gilbert


 
Invented in 1936 by Isabella Gilbert of Rochester, N. Y., the Dimple Machine consisted of a “face-fitting spring carrying two tiny knobs which press into the cheeks.” I wonder if it actually worked? I tend to doubt it…

Isabella’s “cheeky” dimple giver is much tamer than what the woman below did: She injected a $10 bottle of personal lubricant into her face to achieve natural beauty.

Plastic surgery… don’t try it at home!
 

 
(via KMFW)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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