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Iggy’s jacket: The rock and roll Shroud of Turin
05.02.2013
10:19 am

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One of the most striking and iconic pieces of rock and roll clothing has to be the leopard head jacket worn by Iggy Pop on the back cover of 1973’s Raw Power, in the classic shot taken by photographer Mick Rock (above). The jacket was made by John Dove and Molly White in 1971 and appeared in L’Uomo Vogue. They only ever made five of them. Iggy bought one. Zoot Money bought another. One was a gift to their agent in Paris, Dove kept one and an unknown guy bought the other.

From their Wonder Workshop website:

The saga of IGGY POP’S JACKET returns 18 years later when Iggy’s Jacket turns up on the back of Stan Lee, lead guitarist of the Dickies in the pages of Rolling Stone. Ruby Ray’s picture shows Stan half heartedly assuming the Raw Power stance. The interview starts with Vale’s recognition, “The jacket looks like the one Iggy wore on Raw Power!”

“It IS Iggy’s jacket - I got it in a dope deal a few years ago. He didn’t have the bucks so I took that for collateral. For a while, he couldn’t afford it back, and now he’s a rich bitchin’ Iggy, he tried to buy it back and I said NO!...”

The same story is recounted in We Got the Neutron Bomb : The Untold Story of L.A. Punk by Marc Spitz and Brendan Mullen.

Andy Seven: “I remember seeing Iggy at Rodney Bingenheimer’s English Disco after the Stooges broke up when he still had the platinum rinse, with Michael Des Barres, the singer for Silverhead. Stan Lee, who later started the Dickies, used to go there. He was this short, pushy little puffed-out guy with a Marc Bolan poodle shag, and he claimed he had the leopard jacket that Iggy wore on the back cover of Raw Power, he told me he got it from Iggy for dope collateral.”

Ron Asheton: “Oh, yeah, Iggy would trade his possessions all the time for drugs. That’s how he lost some of those great clothes, like that plastic jacket on the back of Raw Power with the Leopard head ... that got traded to somebody for drugs or whatever”.

Stan Lee: “When I was sixteen I used to hang out with Iggy. I got his Raw Power jacket in a drug deal that went down in The Whisky parking lot. It was used as collateral, and thankfully I kept it.”

A few years later, art and toy collector extraordinare, Long Gone John, boss of the Sympathy for the Record Industry label (where the White Stripes, Hole and many others got their start) bought the jacket from Stan Lee. He picks up the story now in an email sent to John Dove and Molly White:

John and Molly

I wrote this for you while flying home from no. California… let me know if you need anything else ... want an updated photo of the jacket ?? all the best as ever…like that, john xx

“I remember Stan Lee from the Dickies wearing the Iggy jacket every time I saw him and remember thinking he’s gonna wear it till it falls apart…he was obviously really really proud of owning it…when you see photos of him wearing it you can see it was still in very good condition at the time…about 5 years before I bought it from Stan, a friend of mine, Tim Warren who ran the label Crypt Records who was living in Germany came to LA. and apart from whatever else he had to do he had intentions of buying the jacket from Stan for his cute french girlfriend ...Tim offered Stan $5000.00 which seemed an enormous amount of money…seems Stan was pretty flush at the time or at least he didn’t currently have a severe drug habit which he often did have throughout the years…anyway, Tim’s offer was turned down and his girlfriend was considerably heartbroken, but still very cute…

I didn’t think about the jacket for a long time until one day a friend called and said Stan wanted to sell the jacket and asked if I was interested…he said he thought Stan wanted $3000.00…I thought that the jacket was so important and would one day belong in a museum and figured it was well worth the money…I drove out to the Valley to meet him at the converted garage he lived in…the jacket was pretty worn, but it was also obvious it was made out of really cheap fake leather material to begin with…the cheetah head on the back was a bit rubbed off, but to me that was inevitable with age and gave it a air of authenticity considering it was at least 25 years old at the time…best as I can remember this was about 1998…being the bargaining fool that I am I offered stan $2000.00 and after considerable haggling he finally agreed to accept it…the jacket was tiny Iggy is 5’ 1” as documented in the song with the same name Stan was also short, but not that short…i’m 5’ 11” so of course it didn’t fit me, but my interest in it wasn’t to wear it anyway…to me that jacket was so iconic I thought of it as The Shroud of Turin of Rock ‘n’ Roll…

I was about 21 yrs old when Raw Power came out and very impressionable…it was one of my favourite albums and r was completely mesmerized by both the front and back cover photos…that record was amazing and I never got tired of listening to it and never got the image of the jacket out of my mind…I have always felt extremely honored to own the jacket and will protect it’s legacy until the next caretaker happens along…”

 
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Below, the trailer for the documentary, Treasures of Long Gone John. Truly he is a man after my own heart:
 

(via The Look)

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Priceless: Vincent Price sporting an afro
04.28.2013
11:26 pm

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Vincent Price all ‘fro’d up for the campy 1973 horror film Theatre of Blood. He wears it well!


 

 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
SataNic Nicolas Cage sweatshirt
04.19.2013
03:00 pm

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Ridiculous? Yes. Do I want one? Yep!

This SataNic Nicolas Cage women’s sweatshirt is available through Etsy shop killercondoapparel for $27.99 + shipping (not a bad price, actually). There’s also a men’s SataNic, too.

Via Ultraculture on Facebook

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
‘Bulge Enhancers’: These skin-tight ‘Star Wars’ bodysuits give me the creeps
04.19.2013
01:46 pm

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I can’t place my finger on exactly why these skin-tight Star Wars costumes are givng me a mild case of the heebie-jeebies, but there’s something very “Greendale Human Being”-ish about these suckers, right? 

Costume Craze is selling these ball lifters online for the low, low price of $63.79! Grab ‘em while they’re hot (and sweaty).


 
Previously on Dangerous Minds:
Fantasical one-piece bodysuits for men from the ‘70s
 
Via Geekologie

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
‘Dressing For Pleasure’: 1977 fetish film that influenced Britain’s punk scene
04.12.2013
04:41 pm

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Punk
Sex

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From the DM achives:

Scottish documentary filmmaker John Samson died at the age of 58 in 2004. But sadly, for someone of his distinct talents, he had unceremoniously faded into obscurity two decades before his death.

Samson was a hugely influential artist who never got his due during the seminal years in which he was actually engaged in creating the films he would later be lauded for. It is only in retrospect that his films are being heralded as being too honest, too real and too thoughtful for the British television corporations he depended upon for the distribution of his work. Years after his death he’s finally getting some recognition in a case of too little too fucking late.

Samson’s films often focused on compelling and unorthodox (for its time) subject matter such as tattooing, fetishism, dwarfism and sex. He approached his material objectively, never editorializing, letting the subject speak for itself. Perhaps it was his own outlaw status that helped him relate to social outcasts, the stigmatized and the proudly defiant.

In 1977 Samson made Dressing For Pleasure, a documentary about ordinary people who enjoyed dressing in rubber and who approached their fetish with a matter of factness that seems almost quaint. The film was an immediate sensation among British fashion designers and within the London punk scene and was promptly banned as a video nasty. It ended up becoming one of the most ripped off British films of the 1970s.

The BBC used segments of Dressing For Pleasure in a 1995 documentary on the Sex Pistols. Having not seen the BBC documentary, I assume the parts they used are the scenes with Jordan in Vivienne Westwood’s boutique Sex and the one where allegedly Malcolm McClaren’s oversized head is wearing an inflatable black rubber gimp mask. Exactly where John Lydon wanted him. 

During Vivienne Westwood’s 2004 career retrospective in London, Dressing For Pleasure ran on a continuous loop and Julien Temple featured the Sex segments in his Pistols documentary The Filth And The Fury.
 

Punk icon Jordan in Seditionaries boutique, Kings Rd.
 

The lasting impression of Samson’s film is not of aggressive provocation (of which punk was often accused by its mainstream detractors) but of an affectionate tribute to a characteristically English strain of bloody-minded eccentricity.

 
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John Samson and his plastic fantastic lover.
 
The long overdue appreciation for John Samson is a small victory for good art. He’s not around to benefit from it. His heart knocked him out the game. I wonder if the stress of the game, the politics and business of it all, was just more than he cared to handle. The hassle of selling yourself can be deadening. His style of egalitarian filmmaking was life embracing and opened up doors into worlds that may have seemed strange to some but contained a certain purity that was undeniable. He found the flesh under the rubber. But perhaps he couldn’t put up enough latex and plastic between himself and the corporate pigs to protect his own beating heart and it attacked him.

The director Don Boyd, an executive producer on The Great Rock’n’Roll Swindle, is still appalled by the ease with which John Samson was allowed to fade away. “He represented a different breed of film-maker,” Boyd says. “He had commitment, vision and a respect for the truth. He was criminally ignored by tyrants in an editorially fascist television era which, thank God, looks as if it’s coming to an end. His best work represents everything they have destroyed.”

Here’s the rarely seen Dressing For Pleasure in its entirety. As you watch it, take notice at how beautifully the film is composed and shot. At times I’m reminded of the the films of Kenneth Anger, the soft meeting the hard, the yin, the yang, the whole damn thing, to a rock and roll beat.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Hands up guys: Would you wear these WTF underpants?
04.12.2013
12:34 pm

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Rusty Blazenhoff over at Laughing Squid posted this rather perplexing men’s underwear-like garment which she appropriately called “one-sided grape smugglers.” I’m not a dude, but I’d imagine these must be quite uncomfortable, right?

I mean what is this? I don’t get it, but I am relieved that the model has either had a Brazilian wax or been carefully airbrushed.

Comes in blue, black, white, and red. The photos on the website selling these puppies are a bit more revealing than the ones I’ve posted here. I’ll just leave it at that. Proceed with caution if you’re at work!


 

 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Hitler wearing shorts!
04.10.2013
01:14 pm

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Fashion

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This photo—well, the pose—is eerily similar to my early 90s high school senior portrait.

Via Retronaut

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Lessons in being hip: The Willy DeVille school of cool
04.09.2013
07:09 pm

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Pop Culture

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Here’s the first in a series on “hip.” It is for educational purposes only. Dangerous Minds cannot guarantee that you will achieve your desired level of hipness by merely reading this material and watching the video. While we have done everything possible to draw on the knowledge of our expert on “hip” (M. Campbell), there will undoubtedly be those among you who simply are incapable of being hip. And for that, we can only offer our profound regrets.

Hip vs. hipster:

The hipster thinks being un-hip is cool. In striving for total squareness, the hipster often dresses like an old man: scraggly beard, thick-framed glasses and a straw hat. He spends most of his time desperately trying to avoid being a cliche and in doing so becomes one. He thinks being cool is not cool. Therefore, he is not cool. The hipster is in a perpetual state of trying to escape himself for fear that he might be tagged a “hipster.” He re-invents himself one Carpenters album at a time.

Hip is eternal, immutable and undeniable. If you were truly hip in the 1960s, you’re still hip. Hip is cool but not ironic. When you see it, you know it, you want to be it. Who wouldn’t have wanted to be Mick Jagger in his twenties? Who wants to be Bon Iver?

Little known fact: Hip people appear to be anywhere from nine to eleven inches taller than they actually are.

While hipness is eternal, maybe the days of hip are over. It’s kind of sad when the hippest living person I can think of is in his seventies, Bob Dylan. Maybe Iggy’s still hip. Jagger certainly ain’t, which signifies that a person can be eternally hip at one point in his life and not at another. Young Jagger = eternally hip. Old Jagger = not hip.

Now is the time for a return to hipness. A time to be cool again, to dress up and be slick. To be sexy. To get out from behind your computers, iPads, Pro-Tools and walk the streets like uncaged leopards, ready for anything, slicker than the pomade on a pimp’s doo-rag. But it is essential to keep it real. To find your own style. We need more Marianne Faithfulls and fewer Lana Del Reys. We need more Kinks, not so many Strokes. I know you can do it. I’m here to help.
 

 
When I first got to Manhattan in 1977 I had no money and good jobs were scarce, particularly for a cat who didn’t like to get his hands dirty. Like many struggling musicians, I ended up working in a clothing store. The joint was on lower Broadway and was huge, a warehouse in fact. I started out selling vintage and surplus clothes and quickly worked my way up to being a buyer for the store. My job: finding cool retro fashions to sell.

I had a knack for tracking down never worn clothes and shoes from the 1950s-60s. I was eventually given my own department at the store. I called it “Rockers.” It became a big attraction for people who wanted hip inexpensive threads to wear and fashion designers from places like Fiorucci who wanted styles to knock-off. My customers included Lux Interior, Ivy Rorshach, Joey Arias, Klaus Nomi, Betsy Johnson, Billy Idol, Joe Strummer, Dianne Brill… virtually every fashion freak in Manhattan and those who passed through it. But the customer that I most cherished was Willy DeVille.

Willy was drawn to the huge inventory of winklepickers and cockroach killers I had in the store: Pointed-toe boots or shoes with Cuban heels. Suburban kids called them Beatle boots. Urban kids knew them as the kind of footwear worn by people you didn’t fuck with. Willy was the kind of person you didn’t fuck with. In many ways, he was a proto-type for the gangster rapper: pimped-out, gold teeth, sinister, street-wise, etc. The public personae wasn’t much different than the personal. He had the kind of nervous grace you associate with people living on the wrong side of the law. Over time, he would lose a lot of that edginess and mellow into a kind of beautiful nobility. And while there were many things one could accuse Willy of being (talk to his friends and foes), he was never ever uncool. As a friend of mine said “Willy was the professor of cool.”

Being hip can both be of the moment and ahead of its time. In Willy’s case, people are just catching up to how totally hip he was. I remember seeing him strike fear into the heart of Mick Jagger at a club, Trax, in 1978. DeVille was on stage and Jagger was in the audience. You could see the awe in Jagger’s face as he watched Willy work the crowd. It was as if Jagger suddenly realized he was not the hippest man on the planet. The cat with the gold tooth, epic pompadour and snakeskin boots was. The devil had met something even he couldn’t deal with. We’ll address this later in the “dark side of being hip.”

Here’s lesson #1 in being hip: How to make cool facial expressions. Watch the video carefully. Practice the moves. Put your own grease on it. Hit the streets.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Monkee Micky Dolenz wearing some badass shades
04.09.2013
05:59 pm

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Fashion
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To me, Micky Dolenz was always the coolest Monkee. Plus he’s one of the first three people ever to own a Moog synthesizer, having bought one after seeing it demonstrated by electronic music pioneers Paul Beaver and Bernie Krause at the Monterey International Pop Festival in June 1967 (Wendy Carlos and Buck Owens bought the other two).

Here’s Micky sportin’ some seriously futuristic shades. At first I described his sunglasses as “retro-futuristic,” but such a concept wouldn’t really have existed at the time, so I changed it.

Below, Micky Dolenz and the boys do “Daily Nightly”:

 
Previously on Dangerous Minds:
Head: The Monkees’ ‘Ulysses of a hip New Hollywood’

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Fantasical one-piece bodysuits for men from the ‘70s
04.08.2013
04:30 pm

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Fashion

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The one-piece bodysuit made out of 100% cotton I guess I can sorta deal with (not really), but the other one, the one made out of 100% acrylic seems like it would get awfully stinky.

Bonus: Both bodysuits come with a zipper fly opening and drop seat back. Fashion meets function!

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
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