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The top ten worst singing rappers

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Over at the Village Voice website hip hop and rap aficionado Phillip Mlynar has put together a top ten list of some of the worst singing ever committed to disc by rappers. See and hear the whole list here.

In the first audio clip, Biz Markie and The Beastie Boys maul Elton John’s ‘Bennie And The Jets’.

The team’s attempt to tackle the Elton John number “Bennie And The Jets” originally appeared as a free flexi-disc with Grand Royal magazine back in the mid-‘90s. Brilliantly, at times it sounds like Biz has no idea what the original lyrics are, so instead he falls back on slurring syllables together as he blunders through the track.

 

 
In the next clip, Ol’ Dirty Bastard tears into The Foundations’ ‘Build Be Up’ with all the style of a pit bull attacking a chunk of raw meat.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Discussion
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Free Jim Morrison! Florida Gov. Crist may pardon the Lizard King for 40 year old non-crime

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The Hill blog reports that outgoing Florida Governor Charlie Crist is considering pardoning Jim Morrison for a crime that was most likely never committed.
 

In his last two months in office, Florida Gov. Charlie Crist is considering a December surprise: a posthumous pardon for Jim Morrison, lead singer of The Doors, for indecent exposure charges after an infamous 1969 Miami concert. In a phone interview with The Hill, Crist said “stay tuned” regarding the idea of a posthumous pardon for the singer who died in Paris in 1971.  Crist said he won’t make the decision lightly, noting the many complexities surrounding the 41-year-old case. Numerous sound recordings from the show exist, for example, but Morrison’s defenders say none of the scores of photographs from the show prove the exposure charge. “We would have to look into all of that,” Crist said.

 
Archival footage of Morrison’s Miami trial (no sound).

 
Via The Daily Swarm

 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Discussion
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Be stoned ! dig: Zipps
11.09.2010
08:52 am

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Amusing
Drugs
History
Music

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Zipps

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Dutch ersatz Merseybeat gone psych band Zipps grapple with the irksome Marie Juana with the aid of gratuitous harpsichord and quaint European xenophobia. Marie Juana, architect of the gods of my mind…. Huh ?
 

Thanks again, Clint Simonson!

Posted by Brad Laner | Discussion
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Billy Carter’s ‘Billy Beer’
11.08.2010
11:02 am

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History
Kooks

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Billy Beer
Jimmy Carter
Billy Carter

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Billy Carter was Jimmy Carter’s embarrassing redneck, alcoholic baby brother. An annoying presence in the 1970s with his frequent TV appearances (on shows like Hee-Haw and Merv Griffin’s talkshow) Billy’s trademark drunken antics—like taking a piss in front of news reporters—served as a constant and frightening reminder that we’d elected a president sharing the same DNA with this hillbilly idiot.

Until the 1979 “Billygate” influence-peddling scandal where Carter was given a loan of $220,000 dollars by the Libyan government, familial relations aside, his biggest claim to fame was “Billy Beer,” a dank, syrupy, shitty, moldy-tasting brew named after him, which he claimed not even to drink himself (Carter drank Pabst Blue Ribbon). At one point, idiotic beer can collectors were said to be willing to pay hundreds of dollars for a can of the mythic “Billy Brew” until the seemingly never-ending supply of said beer cans—after all they made millions upon millions of these things—eventually burst this rather dubious speculative bubble!
 
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Posted by Richard Metzger | Discussion
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Gram Parsons’ last recorded interview
11.06.2010
12:47 am

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Drugs
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Gram Parsons

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As a young man I grew up in the South and I hated country music. That changed when I first started hearing songs from The Byrds, Buffalo Springfield, The Flying Burrito Brothers and Gram Parsons solo work, all of which seemed to me to be quite different from the hillbilly shit I’d grown up around. The West Coast country vibe had a wide-openness about it that was more in tune with my Jack Kerouac inspired desire to hit the road…a road that was as much a metaphor for spiritual yearning as a slab of tar and concrete. Gram Parsons’ western music wasn’t solely about blue collar blues, booze and bad women. Parsons was a romantic in the traditional poetic sense, a seeker of beauty in the coarseness of everyday life. Yes, it was honky tonk music, but in Gram’s world the honky tonks weren’t violent dives of retribution, they were a kind of cowboy cafe society that weren’t far removed from the cafes of the French surrealists in Paris of the 1930’s, where absinthe was drunk instead of tequila.

This interview with Michael Bates in 1973 was Gram Parsons’ last recorded conversation. 6 months after the interview Parsons O.D’d on morphine and tequila in a motel on the edge of the Mojave desert.

Bate’s connection to Gram is almost accidental. In 1973—while he was the host of a CBC radio show in Ottawa, Ontario—Bate was on a road trip when he happened to spot Parsons’ beaten-up tour bus by the side of the Massachusetts Turnpike, 90 miles from Boston. He stopped and arranged an interview, which he says turned out to be the final recorded conversation with Parsons, who died that September from an overdose of morphine and tequila.

Gram candididly talks about Keith Richards and The Stones, bad dealings with The Byrds, The Flying Burrito Brothers and how Waylon Jennings had to walk around the block to smoke a joint during a recording session with Chet Atkins. In the beginning of the interview Parsons makes mention of being stuck in England and left penniless by The Byrds. Gram was fired by Roger McGuinn and Chris Hillman when he refused to join them on a South Africa tour as he was was opposed to apartheid. Some of his friends at the time thought Gram actually quit The Byrds so he could hang out with The Stones in London.

It’s Gram’s birthday today (Nov. 5).
 

 
Via Exile On Moan Street

Posted by Marc Campbell | Discussion
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Six Flags in New Orleans: Where ghosts come to play
11.05.2010
09:09 pm

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Current Events
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Six Flags New Orleans

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In 2005, Six Flags amusement park in New Orleans was temporarily closed in advance of hurricane Katrina’s assault on the Gulf Coast. Five years later, it’s still not open for business. The once thriving attraction is now a virtual ghost town. Sad and eerie.

The park is closed not only to the public but to photographers as well. The demise of Six Flags is not a source of pride for the city of New Orleans.

Music by MGMT.
 

 
Bill Barol at Boing Boing just posted a piece on the sad fate of Six Flags New Orleans. But the article’s video link has been removed from Youtube. The video below is the one formerly linked to the Boing Boing post. It was shot by photographer Teddy Smith.

Thanks to BB for bringing this story to my attention.
 

 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Discussion
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Rescued Chilean miner Edison Peña channels Elvis on the Letterman show
11.05.2010
02:45 am

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Amusing
Belief
History
Music

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Edison Pena
Chilean miner

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Rescued Chilean miner Edison Peña creates magic on the Letterman show. This guy is so happy to be alive he radiates the power of a 1000 suns. His Elvis impression is bliss personified. Wow.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Discussion
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A history of Detroit record labels on a Google map
11.05.2010
01:58 am

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History
Music

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Detroit record labels

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Tremble Under Boom Lights has created a map of Detroit record labels. 

The link below will take you to a Google Map with pinpoints of over 200 Detroit record labels throughout history. With each pin-point comes a little bit of info about that label. My criteria for this was simple…an address I could find for a record label. Most were taken from Keith Rylatt’s essential book “Groovesville USA” but a fair amount were also gleaned from my own independent research, ie, addresses listed on the labels or sleeves in my possession.

A map of Detroit record labels.

Posted by Marc Campbell | Discussion
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The Secret Sex of Dr James Barry
11.04.2010
05:21 pm

Topics:
History

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Sex
Medicine
Dr. James Barry

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It was the charwoman, Sophia Bishop, who uncovered the truth about Dr James Barry.  Her discovery proved a great embarrassment to the distinguished members of the medical profession, who had failed to guess the doctor’s secret, despite their former colleague’s diminutive stature and smooth complexion.

An embarrassment indeed, considering Dr Barry was one of the most outstanding doctors of the Victorian age, a celebrated surgeon who pioneered new treatments, and performed one of the first Caesarean sections.

It was only after the doctor’s death in 1865, as his body was laid out that Sophia Bishop could see Barry was a “perfect female.”  She also noticed what appeared to be stretch marks on Barry’s stomach indicating the doctor had once been pregnant.

As the news of this discovery spread, there was a frenzy of press speculation in a bid to uncover the truth of the doctor’s identity.

The Medical Times reported although the Army had failed to order a post-mortem to settle the matter, their sources said the facts about both Dr Barry’s sex and her maternity were true.

Other witnesses also commented on the late doctor.  The Dean of McGill Medical School in Canada, who had treated Barry for a chest infection, explained his ignorance of Barry’s sex by stating the bedroom had always been in almost total darkness when he paid his calls and this was why he had failed to notice anything unusual.

Staff Surgeon Major Dr McKinnon, who had described Barry as male on her death certificate, admitted he hadn’t been sure whether Dr Barry was male, female or hermaphrodite, but that he had no purpose in making such a discovery.

Dr James Barry was born Margaret Ann Bulkley in Ireland in 1792.  A highly intelligent child, Bulkley desired to study at university, something forbidden to women at that time.  However, in 1809, she travelled with her mother to Edinburgh, where she enrolled under the name of James Barry as a student of Medicine and Literature.  From existing correspondence, it is obvious Mrs. Bulkley was complicit in her daughter’s subterfuge.

Barry proved a brilliant student and qualified as a Doctor in 1812 – the first woman to ever do so in Britain.  It is impossible to guess just how isolated James Barry must have felt, not just in her student days but throughout her entire lonely, single-minded existence.  Her secret was shared by so few, the burden of deception heavy. Barry moved to London, where she qualified at the Royal College of Surgeons, and in 1813, was commissioned into the Army as Regimental Assistant.

Bulkley continued with her disguise as a man and may have served at Waterloo, before travelling to India and then to South Africa, where she served as military doctor and personal surgeon to the Governor of the Cape, Lord Charles Somerset.  It was while serving as Somerset’s physician that the first rumors spread aboout Barry’s gender, as it is believed Barry and Somerset were lovers, and it was here she gave birth to a child.

Despite her diminutive stature, Barry was a fine duelist, and is said to have successfully dueled in order to have a leper colony built. For the next 40 years, Barry served as an Army Surgeon, eventually reaching the position of Inspector General H. M. Army Hospitals. In 1864, Barry reluctantly retired, and returned to England, where she died in 1865, her body was buried at Kensal Green Cemetery, London.

Even by today’s standards, Dr. Barry’s career was remarkable - prodigiously talented and dedicated, her work on hygiene and preventative medicine was pioneering; her concern for the welfare of prisoners, lepers and inmates of the lunatic asylum was revolutionary.  Dr Barry campaigned for better medical care for the common soldier and, long before the advent of antiseptic and anesthetics, performed the first successful Caesarean section ever carried out by a British doctor, saving the life of both mother and child.
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
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Miles Davis: Louis Malle’s ‘Elevator To The Gallows’ recording session
11.04.2010
03:50 pm

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History
Movies
Music

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Miles David
Louis Malle

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This is incredible: Behold as Miles David watches Louis Malle’s French film noir, Ascenseur pour l’échafaud, AKA Elevator to the Gallows, and improvises his moody soundtrack score. Followed by an interview with Malle.

Jazz critic Phil Johnson described this as “the loneliest trumpet sound you will ever hear.” This is like watching Picasso paint.
 

 

Via PCL Linkdump

Posted by Richard Metzger | Discussion
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