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Fantastic wooden sculptures of famous movie directors
05.13.2016
12:05 pm

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Art
Movies

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Stanley Kubrick
 
I like these mash-up wooden sculptures of Hollywood film directors by artist Mike Leavitt. If you notice, each sculpture references movies the director made. The directors are in the details i.e. Stanley Kubrick’s eyelashes referencing A Clockwork Orange or Hitchcock carved as a bird. 

Each sculpture measures around 18 inches in height. Now as to whether or not these are for sale… I simply don’t know. You can contact Mike Leavitt at his site here to find out. You can also follow Leavitt on his Instagram to see his work in progress. 


 

Alfred Hitchcock
 

An unfinished Quentin Tarantino
 
More after the jump…
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Awesome ‘Pink Flamingos,’ ‘Female Trouble’ and ‘Polyester’ nesting doll sets
05.11.2016
10:27 am

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Art
Design
Movies

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Pink Flamingos
 
Man, how I LOVE this Pink Flamingos nesting doll set by BoBo Babushka. The details are impeccable and really well done. From what I understand, BoBo Babushka isn’t making this particular set currently, but since there’s been some interest on the Internet BoBo Babushka is considering retailing them again.

As for the Polyester and Female Trouble sets, it appears they are available. If you’re interested, you can ask about pricing here at BoBo Babushka’s website.


Polyester
 

Female Trouble
 
via Divine on Facebook

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
‘Deep Throat,’ ‘Fantasia,’ ’Rear Window’ and more, each condensed into a single frame
05.11.2016
09:24 am

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Art
Movies

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London-based sculptor Jason Shulman has lately produced a wonderful series of photographs—long exposures spanning the duration of entire films, effectively condensing them into a single frame. The results are hazy and hauntingly lovely blasts of light and color (when he shoots color films, that is), recalling at once the works of J. M. W. Turner and some of the foggier seascapes of Hiroshi Sugimoto. The series, simply titled “Photographs of Films,” is the subject of an exhibition opening this week at London’s Cob Gallery.

The photographs capture something the human eye can’t ordinarily see. They collapse the totality of a movie into a single moment, a single frame. The results vary from luminous colour field abstractions to visual précis that are both a blur and a reveal. The photographs of Hitchcock films show ghostly figures emerging from an abstract background. ‘With Rear Window you can see Jimmy Stewart in his wheelchair against the fragmented lines of window frames. It could work as a poster for the film. ‘The Kubricks, on the other hand, do not show human figures. They stand out for their formal composition, almost dividing the image into a triptych.’

‘There are roughly 130,000 frames in a 90 minute film and every frame of each film is recorded in these photographs. You could take all these frames and shuffle e them like a deck of cards, and no matter the shuffle, you would end up with the same image I have arrived at. Each of these photographs is the genetic code of a film – its visual DNA.’

 

Yellow Submarine
 

The Passenger
 

2001: A Space Odyssey
 
More condensed movies after the jump…

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Leave a comment
John Carpenter to release two double-A-side singles of his film themes
05.10.2016
02:42 pm

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Movies
Music

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It took a while, but John Carpenter has lately been getting due recognition for his considerable accomplishments as a composer.

Just a month ago the director of so many classic movies from the 1970s and 1980s released Lost Themes II, the follow up to his successful 2015 album Lost Themes, which so effortlessly made a decidedly ‘80s aesthetic sound fresh as a daisy.

It’s strange to think of someone starting a second career as a touring musician in his late 60s, but that’s pretty much what Carpenter is doing this year. In 2016 Carpenter will play his first-ever performances as a musician, hitting New York City and London as well as the Primavera Sound festival in Barcelona and All Tomorrow’s Parties in Iceland.
 

 
Today came news of Carpenter’s intention to release two double-A-sided 12-inches featuring film themes from four of his movies from 1976 to 1981. Halloween (1978) will be paired with Escape From New York (1981) (available for preorder here), and Assault on Precinct 13 (1976) will be paired with The Fog (1980) (available for preorder here).

The dueling 12-inches will be released by Sacred Bones Records, which also put out both of the Lost Themes albums.

Today was apparently John Carpenter Day at Sacred Bones, which also released this terrific video of an in-studio performance of the Escape From New York theme:
 

 
via FACT

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Katharine Hepburn dressed as a super-sexy silver sci-fi insect in 1933
05.10.2016
09:27 am

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Amusing
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“I wouldn’t have loved you if you’d been a usual man. And you wouldn’t have loved me if I’d been a woman who didn’t dress like an insect…”

The fantastic images you see here are of a twenty-six-year-old Katharine Hepburn dressed up as a shiny silver bug from outer space, from her first starring role in the 1933 film, Christopher Strong.
 
Katharine Hepburn in a publicity photo for the 1933 film Christopher Strong
 
In Christopher Strong, Hepburn plays free-spirited aviator, Lady Cynthia Darrington who has never taken up with a man due to her intense focus on her career. Despite the sound of it, the film’s plot is fairly lurid and full of philandering characters, unplanned pregnancies and suicide. It was the only time in Hepburn’s career where she would play “the other woman” and interestingly, in Hepburn’s first film role A Bill of Divorcement from the previous year, she played the daughter of actress Billie Burke (you know her as “Glinda the Good Witch of the North” from The Wizard of Oz) whereas this time around she was playing Burke’s romantic rival.

But the real star of this film is Hepburn’s “silver moth” costume. Designed by prolific costume designer Walter Plunkett, the manager of RKO’s wardrobe department whose vast body of work includes the “curtain dress” worn by by Scarlett O’Hara (played by Vivien Leigh) in Gone with the Wind.

I don’t think I’ve ever seen Katharine the Great looking more stunning than she does in these far-out images. As for the spaced-out gown itself, it was up for auction in 2002 along with other Plunkett collectables, but apparently didn’t sell.

An image of Hepburn from Christopher Strong (she’s dressed in an aviation uniform, not a silver bug) was used for a Led Zeppelin poster for their 1975 US tour.
 

 
More after the jump…

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
All About the (counterfeit) Benjamins: Play drug-dealer with fake drugs & fake money from Amazon
05.09.2016
05:11 pm

Topics:
Crime
Drugs
Movies

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We’re not going to ask what you want to use them for, but in case you do want optically convincing fake drugs and fake money for your own amusement, Amazon’s got you covered.

Amazon has several products that are intended for use as movie props to substitute for illegal drugs (and illegally obtained cash). Up top you will what Amazon calls “PROP MONEY Combo 4,” with two bricks of marijuana, a few plausibly schwaggy dime bags, and some fake moolah.

If Combo 4 doesn’t grab you, you might prefer “Combo 3,” which is another variation on the pot dealer set of props, but with a higher class of weed.
 

 
Then there’s the “XMAS SPECIAL,” which may or may not be a reference to “snow”:
 

 
Fake drugs don’t endanger one of being convicted of drug dealing felonies, but the same can’t be said of fake money and counterfeiting charges, where the distinction is a bit more subtle. That’s the reason the money is comically wrong when you get a closer look (also why the bundles don’t persist past the first bill):
 

 
All of the above products cost around $50, and they are all purely props. There’s nothing preventing you from supplementing them with useful and legal items that actual drug dealers would use. For instance, a gun. OR there’s Amazon’s #1 rated money counter, the “G-Star Technology Money Counter With UV/MG W/Counterfeit Bill Detection.” It costs $99.99:
 

 
By comparison, the American Weigh 100g x 0.01g Digital Scale is a steal at $8.84.
 

 
That scale is purportedly so popular among drug dealers that the “Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Bought” section on its Amazon page has become a kind of informal Amazon Guide to Dealing Drugs, with links to various, erm, “spice” grinders, a scientific spatula, a digital caliper, and so on.

We hope you have fun fooling your buddies into thinking you’ve become some kind of Tuco Salamanca, but be careful—it’s impossible to list all the ways flaunting items like this could get you into trouble. Don’t blame us if you land in hot water!
 
via Boing Boing

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
‘The Body’: Little-known 1970 Roger Waters soundtrack features uncredited Pink Floyd performance
05.09.2016
01:41 pm

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Movies
Music
Science/Tech

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The Body is an innovative scientific documentary film that was directed and produced by Roy Battersby (actress Kate Beckinsale’s Trotskyite stepfather) in 1970. The film’s soundtrack, composed by quirky Scotsman Ron Geesin and Pink Floyd’s Roger Waters, was released as Music from the Body. Some of Geesin and Waters’ songs made use of the human body as a sort of musical instrument. Pink Floyd were always big on using the heartbeat, but Music from the Body even used farts. One of the songs is called “More Than Seven Dwarfs In Penis Land.”

In Battersby’s film, internal cameras are used to show different parts of the human anatomy in action. The film was narrated by actor Frank Finlay and Battersby’s fellow Trotsky admirer Vanessa Redgrave.
 

 
“Sea Shell and Stone/Breathe in the Air” plays under the opening credits. If you can’t take the sight of a mother’s breast in a science doc, don’t click play, you’ve been warned, weirdo:

 
Continues after the jump…

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Sexy M*therf*cker: Amazing lifelike Prince doll with custom-made clothing from ‘Purple Rain’ & more!
05.06.2016
09:58 am

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Art
Heroes
Movies
R.I.P.

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Le Petit Prince at
Le Petit Prince at ‘Lake Minnetonka’ with his customized Honda CB400A.
 
Tuesday, May 3rd marked the sadly poignant moment when it became “seven hours and thirteen days” since Prince left this world. And I for one have still not (and probably never will) come to terms with his passing. His loss is a truly immeasurable one that has left his fans (including myself and my colleagues here at DM), dumbfounded. 
 
Let Petite Prince in his
Le Petit Prince in his ‘Dirty Mind’ outfit.
 
If you’re a Prince fan (and I wouldn’t trust anyone who said they weren’t, it’s one of my rules), you know that he was an incredibly private person—and was quick to put the kibosh on video footage of his mind-bogglingly epic live performances that somehow made their way to the Internet. In the past when DM has posted footage of Prince blowing-minds live, it’s always come with a warning to watch it before it gets taken down. Such was the case with Prince and his request to Seattle artist Troy Gua, who created a lifelike figure of Prince called “Le Petit Prince” (or “LPP”) sometime in 2012, and was swiftly served with a “cease and desist” notice by The Purple One himself. Gua, a huge Prince fan, was devastated. Figuring out a way around the order, he continued to take photos of his “LPP,” only now it had a sculpted head in Gua’s own image. In 2015, Gua started to once again publish images of Le Petit Prince and one of his most recent posts on his Instagram featured the realistic looking figure beginning his ascent to heaven by way of a ladder. Sigh.

Gua (who also makes all of Le Petit Prince’s painstakingly detailed clothes) says he doesn’t want to profit from Prince’s death, so you can’t actually purchase a small version of Prince dressed in era-specific attire (although Gua didn’t rule out this possibility in the future or selling prints of Le Petit Prince in action). When I say that the images in this post are almost as beguiling as Prince himself (almost), I’m not exaggerating. From Le Petit Prince riding a tiny replica of his customized 1981 Honda CB400A from the film Purple Rain, to the open trenchcoat and tiny black thong Prince wore on the cover of his 1980 album, Dirty Mind, Gua (who might be the greatest person ever) has created so many perfect Princes that I couldn’t possibly post them all here.
 

Prince as seen in the video for ‘Automatic’ from the 1982 album, ‘1999.’
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
No Wave: DNA and the Contortions play a benefit for X Magazine, 1978
05.06.2016
09:20 am

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Art
Movies
Music
Punk

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The NYC arts publication X Magazine, published by the artists’ group Collaborative Projects (a/k/a Colab), held a fundraising show on March 11, 1978. Three dollars got you an evening of quality no wave: DNA, the Contortions, Boris Policeband, the Erasers, Theoretical Girls and Terminal all played, and miraculously, Colab members Coleen Fitzgibbon and Alan Moore captured moments of the first three of these acts’ performances on black and white Super 8 film. Additionally, there is a remarkably clear soundtrack.
 

DNA
 
The Punk Art Catalogue at 98 Bowery reproduces covers and images from X Magazine and describes the relationship between the no wavers and Colab:

Colab was a non-profit organization explicitly created by young downtown artists involved with film, video, photography and other media to take advantage of newly available government grants. The kinship between the artists of Colab and the rock musicians at CBGB reflected a tight-knit scene where many of the participants lived in the same downtown tenements and lofts. All shared similar aesthetic interests as well as a grassroots approach to promotion and distribution rooted in the perception that the established galleries and record labels largely ignored young artists and musicians.

X was published by the artists themselves who were free to do whatever they wanted on their assigned pages. Some contributors focused on the new music scene, while others favored the same kind of provocative content and populist politics found in the music. The connection between X and Punk Rock was most overt at the X Magazine Benefit when the Contortions, DNA, the Erasers and other rock groups with strong links to the visual arts contributed their talents to help raise money to print the magazine’s second issue.

 

Brian Eno at a Contortions show
 
Incidentally, according to Alec Foege’s now ancient Sonic Youth biography, this was the show that “sold Thurston on the merits of [no wave] music”:

I thought it was amazing. Theoretical Girls was just off the wall. And DNA was the fucking ugliest band in the world.

 
More after the jump…

Posted by Oliver Hall | Leave a comment
Klaus Nomi salt & pepper shakers
05.05.2016
10:26 am

Topics:
Amusing
Food
Movies

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Just when you think you’ve seen everything—like the Steve Buscemi bikini—you come across an item like Klaus Nomi salt & pepper shakers. Now I would have never thought this up in a million years, but yet here we are. Looking at them.

The set sells for $35 by Etsy shop Yokai John. It looks like there’s two different sets in the listing for the Nomi shakers. If you do wish to order these, I’d be specific with the seller about which set you want. The listing’s a bit confusing.


 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
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