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Murder, death, KILL! Vintage horror pulp novels from the 60s, 70s, 80s and beyond
01.10.2017
08:36 am

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Amusing
Art
Books
Movies
Occult

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The cover of ‘Rock A Bye Baby.’ A horror novel from 1984 by prolific horror writer Stephen Gresham.
 
A huge tip of my hat goes out to the exhaustive blog Too Much Horror Fiction (is there such a thing? I think not) for inspiring this post. Curated by the self-described “neat, clean, shaved & sober” Will Errickson, the site has been cataloging and reviewing vintage horror novels since 2010. As a bonafide horror junkie, I’ll never understand how I didn’t know about this site until today. If you’re a horror nerd like I am and were perhaps not hip to Errickson’s dedication to the books that helped shape our youth, then welcome to your new Internet time-killer. Zing!

I’m sure a few of the books I’ve featured in this post will be familiar to you—such as the cover of the 1976 book The Fury which was the basis for Brian De Palma’s 1978 film of the same name starring Kirk Douglas, John Cassavetes and Amy Irving. I’ve also included a few H.P. Lovecraft paperbacks featuring fantastic cover artwork that will bring you right back to those times you spent spinning those revolving metal book racks around hoping to find a cover repulsive enough to freak your parents out with. If this post gets you pining away for this kind of vintage goodness then you’re in luck as many of these books can still be found on auction sites such as eBay and Etsy. Some of the artwork that follows is slightly NSFW.
 

The 1976 cover of a reprint of the novel by Jack Finney ‘Invasion of the Body Snatchers.’ Finney original penned the book, which has been adapted into several notable films, in 1955.
 

‘Evil Way,’ 1990.
 
More macabre book covers after the jump…

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
A life-size Xenomorph skull replica can be yours
01.09.2017
11:44 am

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Art
Movies

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Ever wondered what the skull of the Xenomorph from Alien might look like? On top of that, have you ever wanted to own a Xenomorph skull? It’s your lucky day, bucko: Check out this detailed Xenomorph skull replica. I like it. It would definitely be a weird thing to own and would be a fun item to slip into a taxidermy collection to fool people with. “That one? The dealer didn’t know what that was a skull of. Sold it to me cheap, too. Do you know what kind of animal it’s from?”

The replica, designed by ToyWiz, is made of “durable foam rubber and latex that’s carefully hand-painted for extra eerie detail.”

Based on the deadly creatures from the classic Alien movie, this incredible piece measures 36” long and comes with a display stand for tabletop use or wall mounting.

It’s on pre-order now and selling for $229.99. According to the website, it’ll ship in March. 


 

 
via Nerdcore

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Salomé: After you’ve watched all the Jodorowsky and Kenneth Anger movies, what’s next?
01.06.2017
08:47 pm

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Art
Movies

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Once you’ve seen every frame ever shot by Kenneth Anger or Alejandro Jodorowsky, where do you go for more of that same sort of thrillingly strange alchemical/occult ritual cinematic fix? If you’ve asked yourself that question—and who hasn’t—I’ve got a hot tip for you: Italian avant gardist Carmelo Bene’s utterly berserk 1972 “adaptation” (more like a detonation) of Oscar Wilde’s 1891 tragedy Salomé.

Bene, who died in 2002 at the age of 64, was a towering, if controversial figure of Italian intellectual life in the later half of the 20th century. He first gained notoriety as an actor in a 1959 staging of Albert Camus’ play Caligula in Rome, and as a hellraiser who spent over 300 nights in prison one year. He was mainly known for his work in live theatre and opera. His admirers included Gilles Deleuze, Salvador Dali, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Pierre Klossowski, Michel Foucault, Jacques Lacan and others. Bene is perhaps best known to audiences outside of Italy for his role in Pasolini’s film Oedipus Rex. He only made movies for six years—from 1968 to 1973—and considered his Salomé to be his best. Certainly it’s one of the oddest films ever made…
 

 
When Bene’s movies were screened at the Harvard Film Society a few years back the program declared that “his films resist synopsis” and boy oh boy is that an understatement. It is difficult to describe in words just how truly batshit crazy Salomé really is, but here is how IMDB gamely tried:

A psychedelic re-telling of the biblical story. Salomé is the daughter of the second wife of King Herod. The King is infatuated with her and after she fails to seduce the prophet John (The Baptist) she dances for the King in order to ask for his execution. The story is told in a bizarre way of fast cuts, repetitive dialogue and extreme satire.

Although this is technically not at all inaccurate, it’s so dry as to be practically meaningless in telling you much of anything useful about Bene’s freakstorm of a film which features imagery like a berserk Christ with vampire fangs at the Last Supper, a naked, bald Verushka clad only in colorful jewels (a look pinched for a costume in Paul Verhoeven’s Showgirls, believe it or not) and a man speaking as he lustily eats grapes from a woman’s ass (did I mention that Salomé is NOT safe for work? I probably should.) Salomé was played the gorgeous black American model Donyale Luna who had prior appeared in an Andy Warhol film, in William Klein’s fashion satire Who are you, Polly Maggoo?, as the girlfriend of God (played by Groucho Marx) in Otto Preminger’s Skidoo and as Oenothea in Fellini’s Satyricon. Talk about a resume!
 

A Christ-like figure gamely tries (and ultimately fails) to crucify himself.
 
Aside from the elaborate costumes, grotesque/gorgeous faces, and various and plentiful visual elements that would not in any way be out of place in an Anger or Jodorowsky opus, Bene’s Salomé also calls to mind the Living Theatre, which was clearly an influence here (Julian Beck acted along with Bene in Oedipus Rex in 1967), Jack Smith’s Flaming Creatures and unavoidably Fellini’s Satyricon. Bene’s Salomé has the look and feel of a roughly hewn, bargain basement Fellini film costumed by Leigh Bowery, and his own performance in it is so weird that it appears that he’s out of his fucking mind the whole time, seemingly improvising his dialogue like a horny, drooling Klaus Kinski after he’d dropped some particularly bad acid and laughing all the while like a grimacing, lunatic Woody Woodpecker.

More after the jump…

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
The five horror movies you should have seen in 2016
01.06.2017
09:25 am

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Movies

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2016 may have been a shit year for politics and the mortality of cultural icons, but it was a banner year for horror films and a few of the best ones are ultra-low-budget affairs that may have slipped under some folks’ radar.

What follows are, in my opinion, the five best horror movies of 2016. Note that a couple of these titles were completed in 2015, but did not receive wide distribution until 2016. Also, full disclosure: I have not yet seen The Shallows, Hush, Train to Busan, or The Love Witch—all of which have gotten great reviews from respected sources.

Night of Something Strange
 

 
This over-the-top splatter flick about an STD that turns its victims into raging zombie-like maniacs was shot by up-and-coming film maker Jonathan Straiton in Virginia for a mere $40,000. It looks like a million bucks. With top-notch gross-out effects and awkwardly comic sexual situations, Night of Something Strange delivers the sort of comic-book violence and black humor that will resonate with fans of the Evil Dead series or Street Trash. It doesn’t take itself too seriously, and a sick sense of humor may be required for full enjoyment, but there’s still moments that are shocking and brutal. Straiton is a director to keep an eye on. The film is rentable on Amazon with a DVD/BD forthcoming.
 

 
Deep Dark
 

 
This quasi-art film may be the “weirdest” entry on the list, and I imagine some would find its premise a bit pretentious, but it’s one of the most refreshingly original horror films I’ve seen in at least a decade. Michael Medaglia’s Deep Dark follows a struggling, untalented artist working in the unappreciated medium of mobiles. The artist discovers a hole in the wall of his rented room which communicates with him, at first through a series of notes and then, as the hole gains strength, verbally, and eventually—when things start to get really weird—sexually. The hole in the wall provides the artist with the tools to achieve his dreams of success in the art world, getting him into a gallery and eventually into the gallery owner’s pants, which causes a (sometimes graphically) messy love triangle between the artist, patron, and muse. Fans of Lynch and Cronenberg take note of Deep Dark. Like Night of Something Strange, this is another highly effective film shot on a ridiculously low budget: reportedly $20,000.
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Christopher Bickel | Leave a comment
Touch of Basil: Orson Welles’ spicy salad recipe
01.06.2017
08:53 am

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Food
Movies

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While waiting for the third volume of Simon Callow’s Orson Welles biography to arrive in the mail, I’ve been watching a number of movies by and about Welles. Among them is a documentary that was to have aired on French TV in May 1968, before regular programming was preempted by real life. Portrait: Orson Welles is one of the bonus features on the Criterion edition of The Immortal Story, released last year, and in it Welles shows how he made a salad.

The instructions below are a composite of Welles’ words and those of the documentary’s French narrator. I can’t help you reconstruct Orson’s proprietary blend of dried herbs, but I do know where you can find sherry vinegar from Jerez.

I used to be a very keen, if messy, amateur cook. But in the last years—14 years now since I married Paola—I haven’t been allowed in the kitchen. So the only cooking—the only messing about, rather, that I’m permitted—is the salad[...]

I use dried herbs. This is basil; we use fresh basil when our friends bring it from Italy. Two different kinds of mixed herbs that I prepare myself, and a little garlic salt, and the olive oil; we have very good olive oil for salads in Spain. Of course, the secret of all is the vinegar, which comes to us from our friends in Jerez, where the sherry is made. This delicious vinegar is made from a mix of sherry and wine. Some lemon, pressed in this little German device which looks a little cruel, but it’s very efficient. A bit of pepper and salt, and very important, Tabasco, that great American invention. Be generous with that. And now after this has been mixed—I haven’t been given a fork, as I usually have, so I can’t mix it as well—a bit more oil, and we should be [Welles tastes the salad dressing] ready.

The salad itself, of course, is carefully dried and then put in the icebox to chill. It’s a simple lettuce that grows right outside the house. And we’re ready.

Cut to Jeanne Moreau, facing the camera in a severe sixties dress decorated with a labyrinth glyph, reading from Paul Valéry’s “Fluctuations on Freedom”; and then to Welles at the lunch table, improvising a monologue as Richard Nixon, in which the candidate promises to restore a “true blue America” by wiping out the Irish, Jews, and blacks.

More after the jump…

Posted by Oliver Hall | Leave a comment
Einstürzende Neubauten get violent, poetic, apocalyptic, beautiful & demonic all at the same time
01.05.2017
05:57 pm

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Movies
Music

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Although they’ve gone through several recognizable “eras” in their long existence—including crucial personnel changes—if I had to pick just one thing from their multi-decade oeuvre that best exemplifies the geräuschempfindlich gestalt of Germany’s avant garde heroes Einstürzende Neubauten to play for someone who’d never heard them before, I would without hesitation pick the 1985 film Halber Mensch (“Half Man,” also the title of their then current album, sometimes written as 1⁄2 Mensch). It’s a freaky, mutant masterpiece and in a cinematic category of only itself.

Obviously Neubauten is regarded primarily as a sonic proposition, but it’s crucial to see them live—or at least to see them in action on film or video—to understand how they do it to better appreciate the incredible prowess with which they do what they do. Not that any of the alchemical mystery of the group could ever be truly revealed under any circumstances, because… well I just don’t think that’s possible, but when you experience them in a concert hall setting able to muscularly reproduce the sounds they make in the recording studio onstage, it’s quite impressive. It’s easier for someone new to them to get it if they can see it, too.

Theirs is a form of self-expression that’s far too idiosyncratic to ever attempt to explain—although a hefty snort of speed would undoubtedly go a long way towards getting Neubauten’s point across, I should think—so why bother? Plus I respect what they do too much to try to interpret it, but if I had to describe them, and their unique artform—for God’s sake don’t compare them to Stomp or Blue Man Group!—I’d say they’re like Edgard Varèse meets the Droogs from A Clockwork Orange on the way to Karlheinz Stockhausen’s house to beat the shit out of him and burn it down.

How can something be so brutal, poetic, violent, apocalyptic, delicately beautiful and frighteningly demonic all at the same time?

Many times it’s been said of Einstürzende Neubauten that if there is a Hell, that they would be the house band and whereas this is… true of course, do you really expect that Satan would hire a hack KISS tribute band to perform for his guests? No way, dude.
 

 
Halber Mensch was shot in Tokyo by the highly influential Japanese director Sogo Ishii, the manic talent behind the dazzling “punk” indie Burst City. Sogo Ishii is not a name well-known outside of Japan, but in the early 1980s his highly stylized “cyberpunk meets Mad Max meets the yakuza” film (which featured actual Japanese punk groups like the Roosters, the Rockers, Inu and the Stalin as futuristic gangs) had made him the perhaps the hottest young “rebel” talent in the rapidly falling apart Japanese film industry of the day. Halber Mensch is one of those things where you can’t believe it exists, but clearly someone (oddly the film bears the copyright of The Seibu Department Stores, Ltd.) put up a not inconsiderable amount of money to make this film. It’s an incredibly slick and high tech looking, yet it’s also one of the most primitive things you’ll ever see. The group are seen in astonishing performances captured by Sogo’s highly choreographed camera moving across the ruined setting of the Nakamatsu ironworks, which would soon be torn down.

More after the jump…

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
‘When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth,’ J.G. Ballard’s Hammer film
01.05.2017
08:49 am

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Literature
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“Ballardian” is a word that will only gain currency during 2017 and the years to come. If there were a stock market for words, I would be bullish on this one. Today’s jobs, homes, vacations, grocery stores, politicians, kinks, vehicles, riots, drugs, disasters, wars, and surgeries all seem to have come out of a Ballard novel.

But the feature that gave Ballard his first film credit (as treatment writer “J.B. Ballard”), When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth (1970), is so uncannily prescient as to resemble raw news footage of the day after tomorrow. Watch it alongside any 24-hour cable network and you’ll see: it’s like the screenplay of Dinosaurs was ripped from the headlines.

In his last book, the autobiography Miracles of Life, Ballard recalled the meeting that gave life to the movie:

The first time I saw my name (even if misspelled) in the credits of a film came in 1970, with the British release of When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth. This was a Hammer film, a sequel to the Raquel Welch vehicle One Million Years BC, itself a remake of the 1940 Hollywood original starring Victor Mature and Carole Landis. Hammer specialized in Dracula and Frankenstein films, then much despised by the critics. But their films had tremendous panache and visual attack, without a single wasted frame, and the directors were surprisingly free to push their obsessions to the limit.

I was contacted by a Hammer producer, Aida Young, who was a great admirer of The Drowned World. She was keen that I write the screenplay for their next production, a sequel to One Million Years BC. Curious to see how the British film world worked, I turned up at the Wardour Street offices of Hammer, to be greeted in the foyer by a huge Tyrannosaurus rex about to deflower a blonde-haired actress in a leopard-skin bikini. The credits screamed ‘Curse of the Dinosaurs!’

 

 
Young brought Ballard up to date on the status of the project (“Raquel Welch would not be available”) and escorted him into the office of Hammer’s Tony Hinds, where Young narrated the entire story of The Drowned World for the studio boss. Hinds muttered something about water being “trouble” and asked Ballard for his ideas; the writer described a few that had occurred to him on the drive between Shepperton and Soho.

‘Too original,’ Hinds commented. Aida agreed. ‘Jim, we want that Drowned World atmosphere.’ She spoke as if this could be sprayed on, presumably in a fetching shade of jungle green.

Hinds then told me what the central idea would be. His secretary had suggested it this morning. This was nothing less than the story of the birth of the Moon–in fact, one of the oldest and corniest ideas in the whole of science fiction, which I would never have dared to lay on his desk. Hines stared hard at me. ‘We want you to tell us what happens next.’

I thought desperately, realizing that the film industry was not for me. ‘A tidal wave?’

‘Too many tidal waves. If you’ve seen one tidal wave you’ve seen them all.’

A small light came on in the total darkness of my brain. ‘But you always see the tidal waves coming in,’ I said in a stronger voice. ‘We should show the tidal wave going out! All those strange creatures and plants . . .’ I ended with a brief course in surrealist biology.

There was a silence as Hinds and Aida stared at each other. I assumed I was about to be shown the door.

‘When the wave goes out . . .’ Hinds stood up, clearly rejuvenated, standing behind his huge desk like Captain Ahab sighting the white whale. ‘Brilliant. Jim, who’s your agent?’

More after the jump…

Posted by Oliver Hall | Leave a comment
‘The Cat Piano,’ narrated by Nick Cave
01.04.2017
10:19 am

Topics:
Animation
Movies
Music

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The Cat Piano is an award-winning short animation directed by Eddie White and Ari Gibson and narrated by Nick Cave. For some odd reason the Wikipedia entry makes note not to confuse this with Keyboard Cat. So let’s not do that, okay?

A brief summary of the animation:

In a city of singing cats, a lonely beat poet falls for a beautiful siren. When a mysterious dark figure emerges, kidnapping the town’s singers for his twisted musical plans, the poet must save his muse and put an end to the nefarious tune that threatens to destroy the city.


 
Released in 2009, The Cat Piano won “Best Short Animation” at the Australian Film Institute Awards and “Best Music in a Short Film” at the APRA Screen Music Awards. The short’s bold animation style was achieved using Adobe Photoshop, with the artists drawing directly into the computer with Wacom tablets.

Watch it in its entirety, below:

 
h/t Coilhouse on Facebook

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
‘What’s The Matter With Helen?’ (or remembering Debbie Reynolds the DM way!)
01.03.2017
02:09 pm

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Movies
Occult
Queer
Superstar

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Okay, where do I begin?

First my respects to the amazing and kooky Miss Debbie Reynolds, a great and truly iconic Hollywood star.

Although most obituaries chose to skip over this (in every sense of the word) incredible moment in Reynolds’ career, What’s the Matter with Helen? is definitely worth a look. The film was directed by the bizarre Curtis Harrington, who began and ended his career by making the same short film version of Edgar Allen Poe’s The Fall of the House of Usher. The first when he was just sixteen years old in 1942, and the second at age 73 in 2000. Like Kenneth Anger, Harrington started making short experimental films in his teens in the 1940s. He befriended Anger and was featured in his 1954 film Inauguration of the Pleasure Dome playing Cesare, the Somnambulist. Harrington would later shoot Anger’s Puce Moment.

The young Curtis Harrington was a charter member of the Hollywood underground which revolved around people like Anger, witchy artist Marjorie Cameron (the subject of Harrington’s short film “The Wormwood Star”), silent movie actor Samson De Brier and other druggy, gender-bending, rule-breaking free thinkers. Satanists, homosexuals, witches, freaks, drag queens, artists, murderers, millionaires and bums, the whole gamut of Hollywood Babylon as we know it today long before things of the sort became popular in the sixties. In the 1950s this was as far underground as Hell itself. The most amazing part of this is, of course, that so many of the biggest stars of the day were enamoured with these people, had to have them at their parties and had different levels of social (and sexual) involvement that will provide facts, info and weird stories to obsess on for decades to come. Unlike Kenneth Anger, Curtis Harrington headed for the hills (Hollywood, that is), and had a decent career making mostly odd horror films (and TV shows like Dynasty) while continuing to do his short experimental art films. What’s The Matter With Helen? is one of the best of his feature films.
 
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By 1971 there was a already an established trend in Hollywood horror films, dubbed the “Grande Dame Guignol Cinema,” it’s something that has also been called the “hagsploitation” or “psycho-biddy” genre. I refer to films like What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?, Hush… Hush, Sweet Charlotte and What Ever Happened to Aunt Alice?. Although Billy Wilder’s Sunset Boulevard could technically be said to be the first, the advent of the hag genre exploded of course with Whatever Happened to Baby Jane? starring the aging Bette Davis and Joan Crawford letting their hair (and their faces) down. Way down. Which was the entire professional requirement other than being a former leading lady. Since Curtis Harrington knew so many big stars from the 1930s and 40s who were growing into their fifties and wondering what to do with their careers, he made a few hagsploitation movies himself.
 
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Another thing Curtis Harrington had in his pocket by 1971 was his choice of the cream of the crop of old Hollywood’s wildest, weirdest and campiest actors, as well as some of new Hollywood’s most annoying child freaks, especially since the plot of What’s The Matter With Helen? included Reynolds playing a children’s tap dance teacher in 1930’s Hollywood. So many cheese-eating hamster hambones in this one.
 

 
To quote Shelley Winters:

It’s about two women during the thirties who run a school to turn out Shirley Temples, and in my next scene I have to stab Debbie Reynolds to death. Poor Debbie — they’d better not give me a real knife.”

Harrington’s cream of the crop, being the eccentric that he was, was just incredible. A who’s who of a pop culture obsessive’s dreams. On the top end of What’s The Matter With Helen?‘s credits we have, of course, Reynolds, Winters and future McCloud actor Dennis Weaver joined by the very old time super actor Michael Mac Liammóir (whose name had at least three different spellings), described in a IMDB bio as:

... a theatrical giant who dominated Irish theatre for over 50 years. Actor, designer, playwright and brilliant raconteur he was very much his own creation. He cut an imposing figure under the spotlight and in real life dressed flamboyantly wearing full make-up at all times and a jet black hairpiece. When he died in 1978 aged 79 The Irish Times wrote that ‘Nobody can assess the contribution that Micheal MacLiammoir made to Irish theatre’....Sir John Gielgud commented “Designer, wit, linguist and boon companion as well as actor, he was a uniquely talented and delightful creature.”

 
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As What’s The Matter With Helen?‘s credits roll they further reveal a string of incredible characters: Agnes Moorehead (who had an unforgettable Hollywood career but is mostly remembered as Endora on Bewitched), wild fifties (very) bad girl Yvette Vickers (Attack of the Giant Leeches, Reform School Girl, Juvenile Jungle, Attack of the 50 Foot Woman, and more), and Timothy Carey (possibly the single most out there Hollywood actor in the history of film, who saved his money from movies like The Wild One, East of Eden, The Killing, Naked Gun, Rumble on the Docks, Poor White Trash/Bayou, Beach Blanket Bingo, Head and so many more, to make his masterpiece, The World’s Greatest Sinner with soundtrack by a young Frank Zappa. [Carey spent his later years going on TV talk shows and shooting a movie with his son Romeo called The Devil’s Gas about the importance of farting. Yes that’s what I said]. But beyond them, it also features Pamelyn Ferdin, the most annoying fingernails-on-the- blackboard child actress of the sixties and seventies (who turns up in odd films like The Christine Jorgensen Story and was seemingly on every TV show ever made back then such as My Three Sons, The Monkees, The Paul Lynde Show, Sigmund and the Sea Monsters and too many more to mention.)

What’s The Matter With Helen? was written by Henry Farrell who wrote both What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? and Hush…Hush, Sweet Charlotte (most of these Hollywood hag films had titles that were full sentences or questions) the plot concerns a Leopold and Loeb-type thrill murder committed by the sons of two women who are drawn together by these horrible events. Destroyed by the trial, the shame and being attacked mentally and physically, they decide to run away to Hollywood, where they can change their names, reinvent themselves and start all over. There are quite a few amazing twists and turns in the story, gory murders (even a few bunny murders, the shame!), plus beautiful and weird cinematography that make it worth seeing more than once.
 

 
The insanity of some of the goings on behind the camera are legendary and hilarious. At first they couldn’t find a big name star to take the lead, but Debbie Reynolds eventually took the role of Adele. To quote her biography Unsinkable:

Eventually, Debbie Reynolds took the role of Adelle. She had a contract with NBC to be an uncredited producer of a film, so she chose this, taking no salary. “They put up $750,000 and hired Marty Ransohoff to be on the set, but I actually produced it.”

Incredibly—or not so incredibly considering who we’re talking about—Shelley Winters was in the middle of a nervous breakdown:

According to Reynolds, Winters’ psychiatrist advised her not to portray “a woman having a nervous breakdown because she was having a nervous breakdown! But nobody knew that, and so all through the film she drove all of us insane! She became the person in the film.” Reynolds witnessed Winters’s questionable mental status off of the set. The two had been friends many years before, and Reynolds offered to chauffeur Winters to and from the set. “I was driving one morning on Santa Monica Boulevard and ahead of me was a woman, wearing only a nightgown, trying to flag down a ride,” recalled Reynolds. It was Winters, who claimed, “I thought I was late.” According to a Los Angeles Times article published while the film was in production, Winters was so difficult on the set that the studio threatened to replace her with Geraldine Page.

More after the jump…

Posted by Howie Pyro | Leave a comment
Cinemetal T-Shirts: Iconic film directors remixed with band logos
01.03.2017
11:20 am

Topics:
Fashion
Movies
Music

Tags:


Werner Herzog / Danzig
 
I feel like such a dum-dum for not knowing that these clever remix t-shirts of iconic film directors meeting band logos existed! In fact, they’ve been around since 2005! How the hell did I not know about this? Shame on me. A few of my Dangerous Minds colleagues even own a few.

Anyway, if you, like me, didn’t know about these film-geek meets “metalhead” shirts, they’re called Cinemetal T-Shirts and they’re manufactured in Los Angeles.

Before there were Cinemetal T-Shirts, film-lovers had no means of expressing their favorite auteur directors and musical tastes at the same time.

Well I guess now they do, huh? I really dig the Alejandro Jodorowsky / Judas Priest t-shirt, below.

Each one sells for $29.00 through the Cinemetal T-Shirts website.


Alejandro Jodorowsky / Judas Priest
 

Stanley Kubrick / Kraftwerk
 

Brian De Palma / Def Leppard
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
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