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Kubrick’s letter of praise to Ingmar Bergman, 1960
07.11.2011
04:18 pm

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Art
Movies

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Stanley Kubrick
Ingmar Bergamn


 
February 9, 1960

Dear Mr. Bergman,

You have most certainly received enough acclaim and success throughout the world to make this note quite unnecessary. But for whatever it’s worth, I should like to add my praise and gratitude as a fellow director for the unearthly and brilliant contribution you have made to the world by your films (I have never been in Sweden and have therefore never had the pleasure of seeing your theater work). Your vision of life has moved me deeply, much more deeply than I have ever been moved by any films. I believe you are the greatest film-maker at work today. Beyond that, allow me to say you are unsurpassed by anyone in the creation of mood and atmosphere, the subtlety of performance, the avoidance of the obvious, the truthfulness and completeness of characterization. To this one must also add everything else that goes into the making of a film. I believe you are blessed with wonderful actors. Max von Sydow and Ingrid Thulin live vividly in my memory, and there are many others in your acting company whose names escape me. I wish you and all of them the very best of luck, and I shall look forward with eagerness to each of your films.

Best Regards,
Stanley Kubrick
 
Via Letters Of Note

Posted by Marc Campbell | Discussion
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Kubrick’s letter of praise to Bergman, 1960
07.10.2011
09:42 pm

Topics:
Movies

Tags:
Stanley Kubrick
Ingmar Bergman


 
February 9, 1960

Dear Mr. Bergman,

You have most certainly received enough acclaim and success throughout the world to make this note quite unnecessary. But for whatever it’s worth, I should like to add my praise and gratitude as a fellow director for the unearthly and brilliant contribution you have made to the world by your films (I have never been in Sweden and have therefore never had the pleasure of seeing your theater work). Your vision of life has moved me deeply, much more deeply than I have ever been moved by any films. I believe you are the greatest film-maker at work today. Beyond that, allow me to say you are unsurpassed by anyone in the creation of mood and atmosphere, the subtlety of performance, the avoidance of the obvious, the truthfulness and completeness of characterization. To this one must also add everything else that goes into the making of a film. I believe you are blessed with wonderful actors. Max von Sydow and Ingrid Thulin live vividly in my memory, and there are many others in your acting company whose names escape me. I wish you and all of them the very best of luck, and I shall look forward with eagerness to each of your films.

Best Regards,
Stanley Kubrick
 
Via Open Culture

Posted by Marc Campbell | Discussion
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The Clash made a cameo in Martin Scorsese’s ‘The King Of Comedy’


 
An interesting cinematic footnote to the Clash’s time spent in New York City in the early 1980s, is their “blink and you missed them” appearance in Martin Scorsese’s classic The King of Comedy.

Mick Jones, Joe Strummer, Paul Simonon and some of their cohorts (sometime manager Kosmo Vinyl, singers Ellen Foley and Pearl Harbour and filmmaker Don Letts) are credited as “Street Scum.”

Take a look:
 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Discussion
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‘Read More Movies’: Every word from ‘A Clockwork Orange’ printed on poster
07.08.2011
12:27 pm

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Books
Movies

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A Clockwork Orange
Anthony Burgess


 
I guess in an effort to get people to read more, New Zealand online bookseller Whitcoulls came up with this interesting ad campaign which incorporates every word from Anthony Burgess’ 1962 novel “A Clockwork Orange” on posters. I wouldn’t mind owning one of these. 

Ad agency: DraftFCB, Auckland
 

 
Previously on Dangerous Minds:
Alex from ‘A Clockwork Orange’ stuffed doll

(via Copyranter)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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‘Stop Messin’ About!’: Kenneth Williams plays Darth Vader
07.07.2011
11:25 am

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Amusing
Movies

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Star Wars
Kenneth Williams
Darth Vader


 
This genius redubbing of Darth Vader’s voice with that of camp British comic actor Kenneth Williams is “fantabulosa”!

Williams, for readers who have never heard of him, was best known for his roles in the “Carry On” films, the radio series Round the Horn and for being one of the first actors to play pretty obviously gay characters in UK popular culture. He was also known for his razor-sharp wit and was a popular talkshow guest of 70s/80s UK TV. You could, I suppose, consider him to be the British “Paul Lynde” in many respects.
 

 
Previously on Dangerous Minds:
Tears of a Clown: The Wit and Wisdom of Kenneth Williams

(via HYST)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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Psychedelic spiritual desert journey


 
This video from Tim Baker and The Kleptones combines music by Neil Young, Pearl Jam, Planets, Ian Dury and Rush with clips from El Topo, Zabriskie Point, Walkabout, Enter The Void and more to create something beautiful, mysterious and evocative—a mystical desert noir.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Discussion
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A tribute to ‘Harold and Maude’
07.06.2011
01:14 pm

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Harold and Maude


Painting by Eunice San Miguel of Los Angeles
 
Here’s a blog post ode to one of my most beloved films Harold and Maude. I guess I’m not the only one totally gaga over this movie—I put together a collection of artists’ creations in a shared celebration of their affection for Harold and Maude too.


By Julian Callos of Los Angeles
 

Harold-n-Maude by leodhas
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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The saddest thing you’re ever going to see: ‘Rent-A-Friend’
07.06.2011
10:07 am

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Amusing
Movies

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Sam
Rent-A-Freind


 
Yes this is a real thing and it is spectacularly sad amusing. Rent-A-Friend was released in 1986 for lonely peeps with VCRs who, well… needed a pal. Sam (your new rent-a-friend) has long converstions with you about life and shit. He’ll even hang up the phone just to listen to you!

If you’re super lonely or just need a shoulder to cry on, you can buy Sam for $16.00 here.

 
(via IHC)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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Alex from ‘A Clockwork Orange’ stuffed doll
07.05.2011
09:29 am

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Art
Movies

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A Clockwork Orange
Alex
Angela Tiara


 
Glasgow-based artist Angela Tiara makes these incredible custom order plushies. Here’s her stuffed rendition of Alex DeLarge from A Clockwork Orange. I checked Angela’s Etsy account, and it looks like she’s no longer selling her work there. However, it does appear you can still contact her on Etsy and she’ll make one for you. Her dolls sell for around $50.

Makes the perfect gift for that troubled child in your life. (Now I know what to get for my troubled child’s husband’s birthday.)

(via Cherrybombed )

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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Happy Birthday Ken Russell
07.03.2011
02:01 pm

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Movies

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Ken Russell
Huw Wheldon
Edward Elgar

image
 
It’s Ken Russell’s birthday, and to wish the great genius of British cinema many happy returns, here is his classic 1962 film on Edward Elgar.

Originally made for the prestigious BBC arts series Monitor to celebrate the series 100th episode. Commissioned by Arts Editor, Huw Wheldon, Russell’s film was TV’s first dramatized-documentary, “a major milestone in the history of the television documentary, whose impact was such that it was quickly repeated after its initial broadcast on 11 November 1962, an almost unprecedented honor at the time,” as Michael Brooke at Screen Online explains:

Elgar was made under a series of Wheldon-imposed restrictions, notably a ban on dramatisations of the lives of real people. Russell agreed a compromise: although Elgar and his contemporaries would be portrayed by actors, they would never speak and would mostly be filmed in long shot. Russell exploited these limitations brilliantly, the absence of dialogue letting him fill the soundtrack with almost wall-to-wall Elgar, including pieces that had rarely been heard since their composition. Wheldon himself contributed the relatively sparse narration, but the film’s true eloquence comes from the fusion of Elgar’s music and Russell’s images.

Given the film’s lowly origins, its visual fluidity is remarkable: this couldn’t be further removed from a dry historical lecture. When Russell’s camera isn’t swooping and gliding over Elgar’s beloved Malvern Hills, it’s fixating on strangely arresting shots: the sequence covering Lady Elgar’s death begins with tendrils of mist snaking through a silver birch wood, continues with a dark room full of mysteriously shrouded furniture and ends with the bereaved Elgar’s new and obsessive interest in microscopic natural phenomena. Most television dates rapidly, but over forty years on, Elgar is still startlingly fresh and inventive. Even the black-and-white photography looks like a deliberate artistic choice as opposed to a then-universal convention.

 

 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
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