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‘Calcutta Kiddie Show’: Bollywood vs The Wizard of Odd
04.11.2011
01:49 am

Topics:
Movies

Tags:
Bollywood
Fairy Tales
Children's movies

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Clips from low-budget and very bizarre children’s movies of the 1950s and 60s with a Bollywood mix by Madlib.

Bollywood soundtracks and children’s fairytales seem to have an affinity for each other.

Puss N’ Boots - Mexico
Tom Thumb - Mexico
The Brave Little Tailor -Germany
The Wonderful Land Of Oz - USA
 

 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Discussion
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Rare screening of Ken Russell’s masterpiece ‘The Devils’ at London’s East End Festival

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Legendary film-director and British national treasure, Ken Russell will introduce one of his greatest and most controversial films The Devils on 1st May during the East End Film Festival at the Barbican in London.

The complete version of Russell’s infamous masterpiece arrives for its second ever UK screening. Breathtaking sets by Derek Jarman and Russell’s confrontational use of religious, sexual and violent imagery conjure a vision of damnation in 17th-century France.

Outspoken, promiscuous priest Urbain Grandier (Oliver Reed) is accused of witchcraft by a sexually repressed Mother Superior (Vanessa Redgrave). As rumours of demonic possession spreads to the local nuns, Grandier’s resistance to the encroaching power of the state results in him being made the victim of a show trial in a climate of public hysteria.

Based on events documented in Aldous Huxley’s The Devils of Loudun, this is a potentially once in a lifetime chance to see a lost, deeply disturbing British classic.

More details here.
 

 
Previously on DM

The Book, The Sculptor, His Life and Ken Russell


 
Bonus clip of Mark Kermode on Russell’s masterpiece, after the jump…
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
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James Bidgood’s sumptuous and subversive ‘Pink Narcissus’, 1971

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The film was credited to ‘Anonymous’, which led some to think it was by Andy Warhol, and others, Kenneth Anger. The mix of kitsch and beautiful imagery pointed to both, however, they were wrong. For years no one knew who had made Pink Narcissus, that was until the writer Bruce Benderson became obsessed with this subversively erotic film and decided to track down its director - James Bidgood.

Shot on Super-8, Pink Narcissus is a sumptuous film that depicts the erotic fantasies of a gay male prostitute (Bobby Kendall), as he visualizes himself in various homage to “gay whack-off fantasies”.

Bidgood arrived in New York in 1951, where he worked as a female impersonator, hairdresser, set designer and then photographer. Bidgood started taking pix for Adonis and Muscleboy, but was at first disappointed with the results, as he told the New York Times:

“There was no art,” Bidgood laments. “They were badly lit and uninteresting. Playboy had girls in furs, feathers and lights. They had faces like beautiful angels. I didn’t understand why boy pictures weren’t like that.”

So, Bidgood made his own erotic tableaux, which mixed beauty and kitsch. His first Watercolors presented a young man swimming through a fabulous, shimmering grotto - all of which he built and photographed in his cramped apartment, as he explained to Butt magazine:

“Models were not that easy to find especially for the kind of work I was doing which called for more of the subject’s time than a pose or two wearing less than two square inches of jersey and some elastic and leaning against some fagelas elaborate mantelpiece. In the time I needed to do one shot they could turn ten tricks. And there weren’t all that many great beauties around willing to be photographed nude or semi nude in homoerotic situations. Remember this was before being gay and/or being a ‘male escort’ or pornography, quasi or otherwise, were as acceptable or mainstream as they are now.”

Bidgood had his own distinct style, which later inspired the careers of Pierre et Giles, and David La Chappelle.

From this Bidgood started work on Pink Narcissus, which he shot in his Hell’s Kitchen apartment, between 1963 and 1971. Again, Bidgood designed and made the sets, provided the make-up and costume, and used the neighborhood hustlers as his cast. It was an incredible undertaking, and one that eventually led his frustrated backers to take the film from Bidgood and finish it themselves. And this was why Bidgood took his name off the finished film.  

“See, why I took my name off of it was that I was protesting, which I’d heard at the time that’s what you did…. I’d take my name off and then they’d go “Mr. Bidgood took his name off because…” But it turns out they kept me in the closet, and all you had to do was ask anybody who’s been in it and they’d say, you know, “Jim did this.” It wasn’t like a big mystery, but you would have thought, and then years later I was ‘outed’.”

 



 
Previously on DM

Early Gay Cinema: Jean Genet’s ‘Un Chant d’Amour’


 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
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Antero Alli’s new film: ‘To Dream of Falling Upwards’
04.07.2011
02:55 pm

Topics:
Movies

Tags:
Antero Alli
To Dream of Falling Upwards

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Fans of philosopher, astrologer and theaterical visionary Antero Alli—author of New Age classics like The Akashic Record Player and AngelTech—will want to check out Alli’s new film, an occult-flavored feature film called To Dream of Falling Upwards:

The elder Magus of the Thelemic Temple of Horus just passed away. Jack Mason, a promising young sex magickian cultivated to advance the lineage, loses it all when the elder Magus’ biological son unexpectedly inherits everything with plans to commercialize the Temple. Jack plots deadly revenge and falls into a dizzying maze of underworld encounters with professional psychopaths, desert brujas, and a twist of fate he never saw coming. Meanwhile, Jack Mason’s hot-headed apprentices offer cryptic narrative via their hilarious performances of the classic fairy tale, Jack and The Beanstalk.

To Dream of Falling Upwards will be screened this Friday April 8th, 8pm at The Suberranean Arthouse, 2179 Bancroft Way in Berkeley, CA with Antero Alli in person.

There will also be upcoming screenings of the film in San Jose, Portland and Seattle.

Joseph Matheny interviews Antero Alli on Alterati

Posted by Richard Metzger | Discussion
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You must see this before you die: Ian McKellen fronting The Fleshtones at Warhol’s Factory

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Ian McKellen recites a Shakespeare sonnet while The Fleshtones zone out in the background at Warhol’s Factory in 1987.

This is one of those things that language can’t encapsulate. Not so much because it’s something wondrous or epic, it’s not. But because it is just so inexplicably Zen… as most inexplicable things are.

Broadcast on MTV as part of the last episode of “Andy Warhol’s Fifteen Minutes” TV program.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Discussion
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John Waters and Divine on a rarely seen episode of Andy Warhol’s TV show

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John Waters and Divine appear on Andy Warhol’s cable TV show in 1981. The late Van Smith, make-up and costume designer on Waters’ films, is seen working on Ms. Divine during the interview.

The always amusing Waters talks about his early influences (Herschell Gordon Lewis), his film making style and screens some cool clips from his early movies.

John mentions his book Shock Value which was at the time about to be published. One of my favorite memories is the day that he and Divine signed my copy at a bookstore in Greenwich Village. Two of the classiest trash mavens I’d ever met.
 

 
Part two after the jump…

Posted by Marc Campbell | Discussion
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‘Happiness Is a Warm Gun’: Early-90s VHS montage of films with guns

 
In 1993, Edgar Wright made this video montage of guns in movies and used The Beatles’ “Happiness is a Warm Gun” as the soundtrack. He recently wrote on his website, “The following clip I edited together while at Bournemouth Art College. Way before I’d ever seen an Avid suite, this was done over some long weekends locked in a VHS tape to tape editing suite. Yes, VHS!”

(via HYST)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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Herencia Diabolic: Deeply disturbing Mexican midget clown horror

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Behold the mayhem that is the Mexican killer midget/clown epic Herencia Diabolica. Little “Payasito” gives even the psychotic devil doll that ravaged Karen Black in Trilogy of Terror competition in the creepy department. Seriously demented.

Described succinctly at Raculfright_13’s Blogo Trasho:

Herencia Diabolica is about a killer clown doll scaring the crap out of people and killing them, the movie starts with an old woman dying and holding the clown doll in her arms, it turns out the doll was her best friend and was very close to it. A family member of hers inherits the mansion she lived in and decides to live there with his wife, his wife finds the clown doll named “Payasito” (Spanish word for Little Clown) and decides to keep it for the upcoming baby. Things get weird when the woman finds the doll in the kitchen instead of the nursery, she decides to lock it in a closet so it won’t get out, then later in the night the doll tries to get out and the woman goes downstairs to see what is going on. The woman opens the closet and the little motherfucker gets out and starts chasing her, she runs back to her room but she falls down hard because Payasito was standing on the top of the stairs and made a funny but creepy look at her. She dies at the hospital but the baby survives and the man is now raising his son alone, he’s depressed but he decides to date his ultra sexy secretary (played by Lorena Herrera) to move on. So now he’s married to his secretary and his son is now 6 years old (I think) and he’s super attached to the ugly clown doll, his new mom doesn’t like that he’s very close to the doll and she’s also afraid of it because of a strange erotic nightmare she had involving Payasito and her large (possibly fake) breasts, she tries to get rid of it but the doll comes back no matter what. Payasito gets tired of being thrown away and decides to kill her with a huge knife, she tries to run away but the little motherfucker catches up and kills her.

 
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Watch these clips at your own peril. Should you find yourself afterwards unable to sleep without “Payasito” visiting you in your worst nightmares, just remember: You didn’t have to hit play!
 

 
Even filming a scene like this could ruin you for life. Here “Payasito” fondles the stepmother’s fake tits in a decidedly non-erotic sex dream sequence…
 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Discussion
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Satyajit Ray’s trippy ‘Goopy Gyne Bagha Byne’
04.04.2011
02:48 pm

Topics:
Animation
Movies

Tags:
Satyajit Ray

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Goopy Gyne Bagha Byne (1968) was written, scored and directed by Satyajit Ray. It is Ray’s most commercially successful film and to this day is hugely popular in India.

The cinematography by Shoumendu Roy and choreography by Sambhunath Bhattacharya is particularly enchanting in this fantasy sequence combining live action, shadow puppets and Indian percussion instruments.

Our comic heroes Goopy and Bagha meet the King Of Ghosts in the jungle and he grants them three wishes (boons): they will get food whenever they want, the second: they can go anywhere they want and the third: they will master art of music and everybody will be spell bound and motionless while they sing.

Trippier than E.T. and every bit as weirdly wonderful as anything in Eraserhead, Goopy Gyne Bagha Byne is a ‘head” film for all ages.

Goopy Gyne Bagha Byne is one of 17 Ray films restored by the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences, but the restored version is still unavailable on DVD. According to Film Threat magazine…

[...] the restored print is still in the AMPAS vaults – there is no temperature-controlled film vault in India that could hold the restored version. Since the restored version is not available, older worn-out prints are still circulating. But these prints have clearly seen better days – they are so drained that even the surprise color shot at the film’s end look monochromatic.”

Criterion or Image are you listening?
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Discussion
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Scott Bartlett’s revolutionary short film OffOn (1967) and the making thereof
04.04.2011
11:01 am

Topics:
Art
Drugs
Heroes
Movies
Music

Tags:
OffOn
Scott Bartlett

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Although it may look quaint to our presently ultra-digitized visual awareness, Scott Bartlett‘s OffOn (1967) is a powerful,resourceful and successful conveyance of the psychedelic experience in sight and sound. It doesn’t hurt that the synth score by one Manny Meyer is pure proto-industrial brilliance. Really bold. I’ll say it again: It’s wonderful to have things like this available to all when once it was only viewable by academics and institutions. Included here also is a making of/re-creation of OffOn produced in tandem with a class taught by Bartlett at UCLA in 1980.
 

 

 
Moon 1969 by Scott Bartlett after the jump…

Posted by Brad Laner | Discussion
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