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Lesley Gore on ‘Batman,’ 1967
07.31.2014
06:10 am

Topics:
Music
Pop Culture
Television

Tags:
Batman
Lesley Gore


 
In a two episode story arc from the classic 1960s Batman TV series, Catwoman and her protégé Pussycat drugged Batman and Robin in order to compel them to become criminals. Robin got a little fresh, too, incidentally. But in the end SPOILER FROM ALMOST 50 YEARS AGO it turns out that all along, Batman was faking being drugged so that he could infiltrate Catwoman’s crime organization and rescue Robin. Cheeky devil! You can clearly see why that needed to be two episodes.
 

 
Of course it’s pretty stupid, but nobody watches that show for award-winning teleplays, we watch it because nobody sane hates huge, goofy, colorful fun. POW! And we watch these two episodes in particular because Pussycat was played by pop icon Lesley Gore, who gets to perform a song in each episode, and nobody sane hates awesome, sugary, ‘60s female vocal pop. You don’t hate that, right? If you do, Jeeeeesus, how many puppies have you kicked today, fascist?

When these episodes aired, Gore was still only 20 years old, but was already a veteran pop star, famous for still-familiar hits like “It’s My Party,” “Judy’s Turn to Cry,” and the awesome “You Don’t Own Me.” Gore never left the music business, though she stopped regularly producing LPs in the mid ‘70s. She earned an Oscar nomination in 1980 for co-writing (but not singing) a song from the Fame soundtrack, and she made headlines in 2005, when her coming out as a lesbian more or less coincided with her song “Words We Don’t Say” being featured in an episode of The L Word. Amusingly, her super-chipper 1965 top-20 hit “Sunshine, Lollipops And Rainbows” has lately found a 21st Century afterlife, being featured in multiple commercials, and in the kiddie flick Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs. On Batman, she’s seen performing music from her then-forthcoming LP California Nights, “Maybe Now,” and the title song, which would enter the top 20 within a couple months of the episode’s broadcast.
 

 

 
Previously on Dangerous Minds
You Don’t Own Me: Lesley Gore, Lena Dunham, Miranda July and others fight back in the war on women

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Discussion
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Scriabin’s ‘Mysterium’: Music to destroy the universe
07.31.2014
06:06 am

Topics:
Music

Tags:
apocalypse
Alexander Scriabin


Artist Jean Delville’s title page for Scriabin’s Promethée, originally a section of the Mysterium
 
When he died in 1915, the Russian composer Alexander Scriabin was still working on some tunes intended to bring about the end of the world. The Mysterium and its prelude, the “Prefatory Action,” were, in the words of Scriabin’s biographer Faubion Bowers, “cataclysmic opuses to end the world and its present race of men.” If all went according to plan, the first and only performance would immanentize the eschaton, thereby annihilating space and melting reality; no one would have to pay the band. 

The composer tended to describe his vision in gentler terms: “the whole world,” Scriabin said, would be invited to the performance. “Animals, insects, birds, all must be there.” Artists of all kinds would contribute to the seven-day ritual; the audience’s senses would be dazzled by lights, incenses, textures, music and poetry. Together with fellow Theosophist Emile Sigogne, Scriabin “worked on an absolutely new language for the Mysterium. It had Sanskritic roots, but included cries, interjections, exclamations, and the sounds of breath inhaled and exhaled.”

All this may sound life-affirming, but Bowers’ words are unequivocal. “The universe would be completely destroyed by it, and mankind plunged into the holocaust of finality.”
 

Scriabin’s drawing of part of the Mysterium set
 
Scriabin died young, and he only left sketches of the musical component of the “Prefatory Action.” Russian composer Alexander Nemtin set about finishing it in 1970. He delivered the “Prefatory Action” in 1996, just three years before his own death. Bowers describes Scriabin’s vision of the full show, as the composer planned to stage it in India:

“The Prefatory Action would [...] be a stage work of immense proportion and conception. Bells suspended from the clouds in the sky would summon the spectators from all over the world. The performance was to take place in a half-temple to be built in India. A reflecting pool of water would complete the divinity of the half-circle stage. Spectators would sit in tiers across the water. Those in the balconies would be the least spiritually advanced. The seating was strictly graded, ranking radially from the center of the stage, where Scriabin would sit at the piano, surrounded by hosts of instruments, singers, dancers. The entire group was to be permeated continually with movement, and costumed speakers reciting the text in processions and parades would form parts of the action. The choreography would include glances, looks, eye motions, touches of the hands, odors of both pleasant perfumes and acrid smokes, frankincense and myrrh. Pillars of incense would form part of the scenery. Lights, fires, and constantly changing lighting effects would pervade the cast and audience, each to number in the thousands. This prefaces the final Mysterium and prepares people for their ultimate dissolution in ecstasy.”

 

 

Posted by Oliver Hall | Discussion
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Wild Gospel frenzy takes down the Playboy Mansion!
07.30.2014
10:57 am

Topics:
Hysteria
Music

Tags:

lugf/
 
This never fails to bring a smile to my face and raise the hairs on the back of my neck! It’s The Clara Ward Singers performing on the Playboy After Dark TV show shot at the Playboy Mansion in 1968. By this time minds were open and everyone was exploring anything they could experience that was new. The Clara Ward Singers were always wild, and I mean just as wild as any rock ‘n’ roll insanity from ANY era. They could stand up to Little Richard or James Brown in their prime. This clip looks like it could have been taken straight out of an early John Waters film! The incredible, over the top style and the mile high wild wig-hats are just beyond.

But then there’s the singing and the deranged dancing of lead vocalist Malvilyn Statham! Her name alone makes your eyes cross.This just makes me as happy as can be.
 
cmxlsl
 
Here’s what was written by the person that posted this who evidently was fiends with the Singers:
 

Ezekiel 37: 1-14

My favorite female Gospel group, the Clara Ward Singers, with my friend, Malvilyn Statham on lead, singing Clara Ward’s arrangement of “Dry Bones.” Go’head!! This song refers to what happens in the 7th verse of Ezekiel 37.

In the green dress is Clara Ward (1924-1973), which is why she is not in “uniform” as many of you have pointed out. She and the group caught lots of hell in the 1960’s and 1970’s for their flamboyant style and people are still talking about them, as I have seen in many of the shares. In spite of your views, whether negative or positive, they have paved the way for many folks today.

They stepped out of the box, b/c they were individuals and many of you today should do the same. Be yourself! People like Tye Tribbett are free with their praise. No boundaries! They praise how they feel. Who are we to judge? The Clara Ward Singers not only ministered in churches, but they sang in concert halls, night clubs, festivals, tv shows, and at the Playboy Mansion, which is where this clip was recorded. They were not ashamed to take the Gospel to the people who wouldn’t come to church. I mean, like, isn’t that what we’re supposed to do? Some folks felt like the group was clowning, but I’d like to think of it as giving “unfamiliar” people a good church experience.

 

 
dfgjcdhshdfk
 
If you want more, there’s tons of it on YouTube and elsewhere on the net. Here’s another, much earlier, favorite:
 

Posted by Howie Pyro | Discussion
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Christian televangelists listen to ‘Stairway to Heaven’ *forwards* hilarity ensues!
07.30.2014
10:14 am

Topics:
Amusing
Belief
Hysteria
Kooks
Music

Tags:
Led Zeppelin
SATAN


 
Oh, this is too funny. Evil genius YouTuber Clemtinite took old footage from the Trinity Broadcasting Network with televangelists Paul and Jan Crouch—the Christian duo are trying to find satanic messages by playing the Led Zeppelin classic “Stairway to Heaven” in reverse—and then reversed the whole video. “Turn me on dead, man!”

The longer it goes on, the funnier it gets.

 
via Laughing Squid

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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Legendary Fripp & Eno concert from 1975 will finally see official release
07.30.2014
07:34 am

Topics:
Music

Tags:
Brian Eno
Robert Fripp
bootleg
Malcom LeGrice


 
Robert Fripp’s web presence, Discipline Global Mobile, has announced that an oft-bootlegged Fripp/Brian Eno show recorded in Paris in 1975 has been mixed and mastered to the best possible quality, and pre-orders are now being taken by Amazon, Inner Knot (US), and Burning Shed (UK/Europe).

Hearing the tapes in fully restored audio quality, it’s easy to understand why it attracts such reverence now and perhaps, why the shows attracted such hostility then. No Roxy Music hits, No King Crimson riffs, just a duo sitting in near darkness with a reel to reel tape recorder, improvising over the pre-recorded loops with a filmed background projection. Replace the reel to reel machine with a couple of laptops/iPads/sequencers and the core of much current live performance from electronica to hip-hop was there some thirty years in advance. At the time, audiences responded to such a glimpse of the future with booing, walkouts and general confusion.

Thanks to the discovery and restoration of the original backing tapes, it was possible - with much painstaking restoration work by Alex Mundy at DGM - to isolate, de-noise and match the live elements from the performance tapes to the studio loops to produce the final recording.

 

 
An article by Frippertonics archivist Allan Okada (OK, you know, “Dangerous Minds Contributor” is a damn cool title, I won’t lie, but “Frippertronics Archivist” sounds like a mighty sweet gig, too…) describes the concert itself thusly:

Fripp just recently disbanded King Crimson at a point which many would describe as their artistic pinnacle. Eno also recently parted ways with Roxy Music at a similar juncture and then aborted his first and only extensive solo tour after only a handful of shows, due to a collapsed lung. Fripp & Eno live in concert? What would they do? All the shows in Spain and France were, not surprisingly, accompanied with unrealistic fan expectations, hoping for a presentation of ‘21st Century Schizoid Man’ combined with ‘Baby’s on Fire’ perhaps? What this audience got was something entirely different. The programme was largely improvised and totally instrumental. Adding to the event’s unorthodoxy was the absence of all conventional stage lighting. The sole illumination was provided by Malcolm LeGrice’s colour saturated and looped short film ‘Berlin Horse’ projected behind the two shadowy figures on stage, visually mimicking the music. The result was an unprecedented live performance format, years ahead of its time. It was also mind-boggling to most of the unsuspecting 1975 audience, yielding wildly different reactions. Reportedly about half the shows on this tour were also plagued with some sort of major technical hazard, stemming from the venue, the PA or the duo’s stage equipment. In Saint-Étienne, the audience went as far as booing the duo off the stage! Fortunately for us here, this Paris Olympia performance was technically flawless and from a musical standpoint, incredibly inspired.

You can judge the show’s level of inspiration yourself—as mentioned above, bootlegs have been around forever, and they are of course on YouTube. See what you think.
 

 
The trance continues after the jump.

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Discussion
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United States of Jedi: Liam Lynch vs. ‘Star Wars’
07.30.2014
07:24 am

Topics:
Amusing
Movies
Music

Tags:
Star Wars
Liam Lynch

lynchjedi.jpg
 
It’s possibly the anticipation of the next Star Wars movie that’s brought this mash-up from circa 2007 back into the ether. Whatever…is generally how I feel about the series of Star Wars movies, which is maybe why I quite like this mash-up of Liam Lynch’s “United States of Whatever” with sample dialog from Star Wars.

Some of you will remember a similar mash-up between Lynch and Darth Vader’s “Noooooooooooo!” back in 2011, but this one has the edge.

It comes via Bootie Dragon, who has a variety of similar mash-ups over on Sound Cloud, along with a rather tasty mix tape that includes samples of Kraftwerk, William Burroughs, Doctor Who and The Beastie Boys all dovetailed together.
 

 

 
H/T Nerdcore
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
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Dean Wareham covers Joy Division/New Order’s ‘Ceremony’ live on KEXP


 
If not for Galaxie 500’s version of “Ceremony,” I probably wouldn’t like that song all that much.

OK, so while the commenters busy themselves sharpening their claws and crayons to inform me that I’m an idiot who knows nothing of music and should immediately be fired, let’s talk about the song. “Ceremony” was an ill-starred entry into the later Joy Division catalog. No proper studio recording was ever made, so the version most fans know best is the live version on the posthumous JD release Still, from which about half the vocals are AWOL. A different version, culled from a rehearsal tape, appeared on the boxed set Heart & Soul. The vocals are all present, but are largely unintelligible, and there’d never be another chance to get it right, as the group’s singer Ian Curtis took his own life days after that tape was made. I’ve heard that another live version exists, a crummy bootleg of a soundcheck,  but I’m aware of no extant version with Curtis’ vocals clear and complete. (If I’m wrong on that, for the love of all that matters in this shitsack world, post a link, PLEASE.)
 

Joy Division, ”Ceremony,” version from Still
 

Joy Division, ”Ceremony,” version from Heart and Soul
 
The ceremony continues after the jump.

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Discussion
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Buy your own DEVO Booji Boy mask
07.29.2014
08:59 am

Topics:
Fashion
Music

Tags:
Booji Boy
DEVO

Booji Boy
 
You can “pre-order” an authentic Booji Boy mask direct from DEVO, for a cool $125. I’m not sure why it’s pre-ordering when it says on the same page that the item is “in stock,” but whatever.
 
Booji Boy
Booji Boy indulging his curiosity in the “Satisfaction” video
 
Here’s DEVO’s sales pitch:
 

Official Booji Boy mask! Now you can assume the role of the infantile spirit of DEVO as you spread the truth about Devolution. This high-quality latex mask was lovingly crafted by SikRik Masks in Akron, Ohio under the supervision of DEVO, Inc. and Booji Boy. This is the 2nd Version Sculpt Circa 2014. First Version was in a limited edition of 100 and sold out in 2012. Each original mask design is hand sculpted, hand molded, hand poured, hand trimmed and hand painted by SikRik Studios using only the finest materials to deliver the finest independent mask available.

 
The thing I want to do is to buy about twenty of them and mount a really peculiar production of Thornton Wilder’s Our Town.......

Booji Boy in the video for “Beautiful World”:
 

Posted by Martin Schneider | Discussion
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Reverend Horton Heat’s new video ‘Mad Mad Heart,’ a Dangerous Minds exclusive
07.29.2014
07:12 am

Topics:
Music

Tags:
rockabilly
Reverend Horton Heat


 
When his 1990 debut Smoke Em If You Got Em arrived on Sub Pop records, Jim “The Reverend Horton Heat” Heath forged an unlikely audience comprised of tat-sleeved rockabilly fans, people on the front guard of the nascent swing revival, and fans of heavy rock. The tours for the subsequent Full Custom Gospel and Liquor in the Front cemented Heat’s rep for amazing live shows, and he’s been a favorite racket-kicker-upper of the pomade brigade ever since. He functions as a kind of mischievous evil twin to Brian Setzer—like the ex-Stray Cat, Heat draws inspiration from rockabilly, country, surf-rock, and the swing/big-band era, but he’s decidedly and unapologetically less NPR-friendly about it, preferring a raucous, humorous presentation that’s derived as much from punk as honky-tonk. Heat rocks out hard, and is just a metric shitload of fun.
 

 
Heat’s new LP, REV, was released in January to become his highest charting release yet in 25 years, and has been getting generally favorable press, including from Dangerous Minds. His latest video from the album is “Mad Mad Heart,” and we’re pleased to be the first to show it to you.
 

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Discussion
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Men in black: The Stranglers’ BBC documentary about the color black, 1982
07.29.2014
06:42 am

Topics:
Music
Punk
Television

Tags:
The Stranglers


 
In 1982, BBC Southwest aired a short documentary about the color black made by two members of the Stranglers. Singer/guitarist Hugh Cornwell and drummer Jet Black
“were asked to put together a piece about the colour black for an arts programme called RPM,” according to Cornwell’s autobiography.

Around this time, the Stranglers were obsessed with the sinister Meninblack (as they stylized it) legends of UFO lore. They had released their great concept album, The Gospel According to the Meninblack, and changed their names to Hughinblack, JJinblack, Daveinblack and Jetinblack; they were even thinking about changing the band’s name to the Men in Black. Ultimately, these pursuits scared the band shitless.

“We were unearthing very curious connections between UFOs and dark forces,” Cornwell writes in his autobiography, characterizing the period as “disastrous.” “It wasn’t until after we had finished on The Meninblack album and had moved on to working on La Folie, that the misfortunes stopped.”
 

 
Cornwell touches on the BBC documentary in The Stranglers: Song by Song: “Jet and I made a television programme about how the colour black has always been associated with authority. We were doing a lot of research into the Meninblack, but there were certain crucial books that we couldn’t get hold of at the National Library. It just so happened to be the books that related to the connection between the Meninblack, religion and civilisation.”
 

Posted by Oliver Hall | Discussion
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