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‘Green Room’ is the most badass movie of 2016: Exclusive clip and free tickets
04.20.2016
01:41 pm

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Movies
Music
Punk

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Seeing a movie for the first time at a film festival can be a dicey proposition when it comes to objectivity. Particularly genre festivals like Fantastic Fest when you’ve got a theater crammed with fanboys craving to have a collective cinematic orgasm when a movie delivers a never before seen over-the-top money shot. The roar of the mouthbreathers and the smell of the crowd can fog even the sharpest of minds. Last year the Turkish film Baskin wowed Fantastic Fest attendees with a gore-slathered climax that was intended to shock, but at its best was merely repellent with its tired torture porn tropes. Worse, it was boring. And Tom Six’s odious ode to analingus The Human Centipede 3 (Final Sequence) was a group grope that proved that enough of a bad thing is truly enough. Thank god it wasn’t in Odorama.

Overall, Fantastic Fest is reliably consistent in its excellent programming and there were plenty of films to revive your faith in cutting-edge cinema. High Rise by Ben Wheatley, Lobster by Yorgos Lanthimos, Anders Thomas Jensen’s Men And Chicken and Matteo Garrone’s A Tale Of Tales are all being released in the next few weeks and I recommend them highly. But the movie that really knocked my socks off, Green Room, is being released on Friday in 18 cities and Dangerous Minds is giving away tickets. The movie opened last Friday in three cities and had the highest per screen gross of any film currently in theaters. This could be one of the rare authentically rock and roll movies to actually be a hit. And we want you to see it.


As I wrote in my original review of Green Room last year:

Green Room‘s plot is crazily clever: Ain’t Rights, a young punk band from the Washington D.C. area, proudly channeling their Dischord Records’ influences, land a last minute gig during a tour of the Pacific Northwest (somewhere near Portland). Booked into a rural music venue that turns out to be a gathering place for white supremacist headbangers, Ain’t Rights find themselves confronting the mosh pit from Hell. Far from the security of the suburbs where Hot Topics sell Doc Martens to fifth generation punks, Ain’t Rights are hurled into a dark reality where Ed Gein has traded in his plaid cap for a pair of red bootlaces and suspenders. Performing Dead Kennedys’ “Nazi Punks Fuck Off” before a mob of Hitler-worshiping fuckwads is a heroically dumb move for our band of young anarchists, but it’s just the beginning in an ever-escalating nightmare involving murder, thrash metal, heroin and a violent gang of skinheads led by the epically skin-headed Patrick Stewart.

Green Room succeeds in its mission to pin your ass to the theater seat. It combines the tightly crafted action chops of John Carpenter’s Assault On Precinct 13 with some of the psychotic mayhem of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre and The Hills Have Eyes.  But instead of mutant cave dwellers and Leatherface, we’ve got goose-stepping skins with boxcutters and shotguns: The Rocking Dead.

For those viewers who know more than a little bit about punk culture, Green Room works so well, despite its off-the-wallness, because it feels authentic. It gets the details right. Director Jeremy Saulnier (Blue Ruin) knows the punk scene and the vibe of his subjects because he was one of them, as evidenced by a savvy soundtrack that perfectly weds music to action. Napalm Death, Bad Brains, Misfits, Minor Threat and Slayer create the background thump and grind to a movie that is disturbing, funny and supremely badass.


So kids if you wanna see a movie that will undoubtedly be in my top ten of 2016, we’ve got tickets for you and an exclusive clip… after the jump…

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Love songs: Arthur Lee and Love in electrifying, seldom-seen 1970 live footage
04.20.2016
01:24 pm

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As anyone lucky enough to have seen the late, great Arthur Lee in performance can tell you, it was a very special experience. I saw Arthur perform three times myself, including an early 90s gig at a biker bar in North Hollywood with Baby Lemonade where the electricity went out and he did a candle-lit “unplugged” set without the group. Pure magic. The entire audience was grinning from ear to ear.

The second time I saw Arthur Lee play was even more memorable. After spending 5-1/2 years in a California Federal prison, Arthur was released and in 2003 he began a tentative series of performances around Los Angeles playing Love’s classic 1967 album Forever Changes in its entirety.

When he walked onstage the night I saw him, at a packed Henry Fonda Theatre, he looked tiny, frail, old, and just scared. His clothes looked too big. Everyone was pulling for him, we all wanted this to be amazing and triumphant, but frankly it didn’t look promising. Within seconds, however, he strapped on his hollow body electric guitar, smiled broadly and became the great Arthur Lee before our very eyes. It was a magical musical event. Lee’s voice had lost none of its beauty and range; the songs none of their power. Audience members were moved to tears. It felt like a holy moment, it really did. (Of the third time, a tragically ill-fated show at UCLA in front of an audience that included some major celebrities and rock stars, the less said the better.)

But sadly, as Arthur Lee and Love fans know, there is almost no footage—as in nearly none—of the original, classic Love line-up performing. There’s an American Bandstand appearance from 1966 with a lip-sync of “My Little Red Book” and “Message to Pretty” but most television outlets had no use for a multi-racial rock group at the time. As with the Velvet Underground, Lee and Love’s most vital and creative years were almost completely undocumented on film and video. Somehow they just slipped through the cracks.

The Four Sale-era incarnation of Love with Gary Rowles, Frank Fayad and George Suranovich was shot live in Denmark in 1970. Not the same musicians, save for Lee, who recorded the classic Forever Changes album, but who’s going to complain about vintage live film footage of Arthur fucking Lee? This was aired as A Group By The Name Of Love in July of 1970. The concert footage is from a show at Tivoli Koncertsal, Copenhagen, on March 12, 1970.

A brief interview with Arthur followed by an energetic “Love is More than Words”

 
More Love after the jump…

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
‘Shame’: Just what you needed, a Christian ‘parody’ of David Bowie’s ‘Fame’
04.20.2016
01:22 pm

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Belief
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The YouTube account with the handle TheParodyQueen is dedicated to Christian parodies of popular songs. As the Queen describes herself, she’s “a wacky blonde who loves writing parodies of all genres with Christian lyrics.”

In fairness, the covers aren’t bad at all and she certainly doesn’t seem very censorious or forbidding about any of it. It’s evident that the Parody Queen and her guitarist know David Bowie’s “Fame” inside and out and even seem to be grooving to it.

Here’s a sample of the lyrics:

Shame
Keeps a man from the mirror
Shame
Steals hope from tomorrow
Shame
Makes you weep and brings you sorrow
Shame
A ball and chain through your veins is entertained by bringing you ...
Pain

-snip-

Is it any wonder
It infects and hurts?
Shame
Is it any wonder
How Jesus took the curse?
Shame

 
The curious are welcome to peruse the account, which has Christian parodies of songs by Led Zeppelin, the Bee Gees, Gloria Gaynor, CCR, and so on.
 

 
via Christian Nightmares

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
‘Cannabis’: Take a big hit of Slim Twig’s Serge Gainsbourg cover for 420 Day
04.20.2016
11:33 am

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Drugs
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Music

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I’ve been fairly unabashed in my praise of Toronto-born rocker Slim Twig. Two of my very most favorite albums of the the past two years are his creative handiworks, A Hound At The Hem and its worthy follow-up Thank You For Stickin’ With Twig, both out in America on DFA Records. And so without any further preamble—you can read my past ruminations on Slim Twig here and here—it’s my great pleasure today, here on the sacred herbal holiday of 420 Day to debut this video for Mr. Twig’s slinky, smoky cover of Serge Gainsbourg’s ode to “Cannabis.”
 

Slim Twig goes casual at the bowling alley

Cannabis” comes from the soundtrack to a 1970 French film of the same name which actually stars Gainsbourg as well, portraying a hitman for the mafia who falls in love with Jane Birkin, the daughter of an ambassador. The original number was performed and written by Gainsbourg and orchestrated by his future Melody Nelson collaborator Jean-Claude Vannier. Cannabis, which was amusingly retitled French Intrigue for the puritanical US market, was uploaded in its entirety to YouTube. It’s in French, with no English subtitles, but you still get to see Serge as a gun-toting, rabbit-fur coat-wearing badass causing mayhem, smoking a lot of cigarettes and je t’aiming Jane Birkin as often as possible.

DFA have set up a special Weedtransfer site for legally purchasing “Cannabis” in digital or physical formats.

“In a scene like this, you get a contact-high!”
 

 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Amusing manga of The Cure, Siouxsie Sioux, Marc Bolan, Hanoi Rocks & more from the 80s
04.20.2016
09:14 am

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Amusing
Art
Music

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Robert Smith of The Cure on the front cover of Japanese music magazine 8 Beat Gag, 1988
Robert Smith of The Cure on the front cover of Japanese music magazine ‘8 Beat Gag,’ 1988.
 
I’m really into these sweet manga illustrations which were published back in the 80s in a Japanese music magazine called 8 Beat Gag. Written in Japanese, most (if not all) are likely by the the rather prolific manga artist Atsuko Shima—but she wasn’t the only artist that created the cartoons that featured popular musical acts in weird situations that Japanese youth were obsessing about.

The fantastic cartoon of Finnish band Hanoi Rocks, which may have also been published in 8 Beat Gag, did show up as a surprise insert UK pressings of the band’s last record 1984’s Two Steps From the Move. Which makes me want to hunt a copy down just so I can have one of my own. When it comes to finding copies of 8 Beat Gag, good luck. As when they do pop up (which they occasionally do), they will cost you a tidy sum. The comic featuring The Cure (where Robert Smith Inexplicably morphs into some sort of goth Yeti. Because, Japan), follows in its entirety as well as a few others featuring Siouxsie Sioux going up against Girlschool in some sort of track event involving vegetables, Phil Lynott of Thin Lizzy, Marc Bolan, Peter Murphy, Morrissey and 80s New Wavers Ultravox.
 
A manga cartoon about The Cure from Japanese music magazine, 8 Beat Gag, 1988
A manga cartoon about The Cure from Japanese music magazine, ‘8 Beat Gag,’ 1988.
 

 

 

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
Never before seen live footage of the Pop Group in 1980
04.20.2016
08:57 am

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Music
Punk

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In the wake of significantly renewed activity from the politically-charged post-punk funk agitators The Pop Group, it seems like recordings of their early years, many once considered “lost,” are finding their way out of the woodwork with increasing frequency. Only a few months ago, DM shared the video for the band’s signature single, “We Are All Prostitutes,” which had been missing for decades, and which turned up in an amazingly timely manner—just before the song was released as an add-on to the reissued LP For How Much Longer do we Tolerate Mass Murder? (We expressed some cynicism about the timing of that coincidence when we posted the video, but we’ve been assured that its discovery at that time was a genuine fortuity.)

Given the increased interest in the reactivated band, the worthy material culled from all those basement tapes has naturally been compiled for releases—in 2014, Cabinet of Curiosities assembled unreleased live tracks, Peel sessions and alternate takes. This year, The Boys Whose Head Exploded will feature live tracks, mostly from 1980, recorded in Cologne, Milan, Sheffield, and Helsinki, with a video adjunct—footage shot by no less a notable punk archivist than filmmaker Don Letts of The Punk Rock Movie and Big Audio Dynamite fame. Letts shot segments of the band in performance at the Beat the Blues Festival, held on June 15, 1980 at London’s Alexandra Palace. A sound recording of that performance was released as part of the Japan-only live 2xCD comp Idealists In Distress From Bristol, but the video has never been seen before.
 
Keep reading after the jump…

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Leave a comment
Meet ‘Soul Sister #1’: Marvellous Marva Whitney, the sexy, funky muse of James Brown
04.19.2016
02:03 pm

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Music

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Although she’s somewhat of an obscure figure today, beautiful Marva Whitney was known as “Soul Sister #1” during her stint in the James Brown Revue as the featured vocalist. The Kansas City-born belter—singing with her family’s gospel choir since the age of three—stayed with Brown (the two were in a relationship) and the Revue for three years before leaving in late 1969 or early 1970, exhausted by the schedule kept by the hardest working man in show business with whom she toured America, Asia, Europe and Africa.
 

 
Whitney’s first solo single, “Your Love Was Good To Me” was recorded for Brown’s King Records label in mid-1967, but was not a success, nor were two follow-up attempts at hits. Her first chart hit came with “It’s My Thing (You Can’t Tell Me Who to Sock It To),” a “response” from womankind to The Isley Brothers’ hit “It’s Your Thing,” which reached number 19 on the Billboard R&B chart and number 82 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1969.
 

 
Whitney followed up with two lesser hits, “Things Got To Get Better (Get Together)” and “I Made A Mistake Because It’s Only You, Pt 1.” All told, she recorded three albums Unwind Yourself, Live and Lowdown at the Apollo and It’s My Thing, along with 13 singles with James Brown as producer and writer or co-writer. After leaving the Godfather of Soul’s stable, she wasn’t really able to book the big venues as a headliner and left the music industry to raise a son, working sporadically in the music business after that.

In December 2012, Marva Whitney died at her home, aged 68.

First up a SEXY performance of “Things Got To Get Better (Get Together)” on ABC’s Music Scene TV program in 1969. If this woman is not hotness personified, I don’t know who would be…

 
More Marvellous Marva Whitney after the jump…

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Watch a very tired Nirvana being interviewed just a few weeks after ‘Nevermind’ came out
04.19.2016
12:25 pm

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Music

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I find it difficult to imagine what the final months of 1991 and the first months of 1992 could possibly have been like for the members of Nirvana. Nevermind came out on September 24, 1991, and has been a staple of “top albums of all time” lists ever since. It must have been a supreme mindfuck to go from believing that it would be an improbable long shot that your band would ever achieve a status comparable to their buddies the Melvins to being hailed as something akin to a Beatles for the Generation X. In a space of a few weeks, Nirvana went from a band admired by a passionate coterie to the band on everyone’s lips, and suddenly absolutely everyone wanted a part of them.

As a result, Kurt Cobain, Krist Novoselic, and Dave Grohl were busy little beavers that winter, as this crowded chronology suggests. A couple days before the album release, on September 20, they commenced a fast tour of North America, starting in Toronto and hitting some 30-odd locations by the end of October. On November 2, the same day that Nevermind entered the top 40 (at a humble #35), the band flew to England for a European tour, the first show happening in Bristol on November 4. They hung out in England for a few dates, then played Germany, Austria, Italy, Belgium, and the Netherlands, returning to the British Isles for the last week in November and the first week of December. By this time Nevermind‘s status as an authentic phenomenon was sealed, as the album was certified gold and platinum simultaneously, on November 27.
 

 
During that second visit to Great Britain, Nirvana taped an appearance on Top of the Pops on November 27 and a day later taped an extensive interview with Antoine de Caunes of Rapido, which at the time had attained some status as a cult music/interview show of the type that future readers of Dangerous Minds adore.

Nirvana was in some kind of historico-cultural zone during this stretch, and the band’s appearance on Top of the Pops is an excellent case in point. The band could do no wrong by this time, somewhat like the Beatles in the U.S. in 1964. This appearance is well known as the one in which TOTP demanded that Kurt lip-sync his vocals on “Smells Like Teen Spirit,” but the band demurred, leading to a compromise in which only the vocal track would be taped live. So in protest, Kurt sang his vocal in an unnaturally (hilariously) bass register that had nothing to do with how the song’s supposed to go, while all three guys ostentatiously “non-played” their instruments with outsize gestures in which their hands were never remotely close to where they were supposed to be.

Keep reading after the jump…

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Historic footage of the time Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young reformed for one night only, 1973
04.19.2016
10:27 am

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Music

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Photo by Joel Bernstein
 
After the success of their monstrously popular Déjà Vu album, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, “the American Beatles” as they were often called (never mind that one was a Brit and another Canadian) broke up in the summer of 1970, with all four members of CSNY recording solo albums. Soon afterwards Stills released his eponymous solo album which featured guests like Eric Clapton, Jimi Hendrix, “Mama” Cass Elliot, Booker T Jones, Ringo Starr, as well as Crosby and Nash, Rita Coolidge and CSNY drummers Dallas Taylor and Johnny Barbata. Crosby’s If I Could Only Remember My Name and Nash’s Songs for Beginners appeared the following year. In late 1971, Stills teamed up with ex-Byrd Chris Hillman to form Manassas and Neil Young was up to all sorts of things at the time, being the prolific chap he’s always been known to be and producing some of his very best work.

In 1973, a black and white video recording was made of an impromptu CSNY set taped live at Bill Graham’s Winterland in San Francisco. It was originally a Stephen Stills and Manassas concert, but then some “very special guests” decided to show up. At the time Neil Young was on what could be called his Tonight’s the Night tour with the Santa Monica Flyers and Crosby & Nash were touring as a duo.

It’s sloppy, sure—and clearly none of them could be bothered to actually tune their fucking guitars—but the four hadn’t played together in well over two years at this point, although Young had jammed with Crosby and Nash at Winterland on March 26th, 1972 at an event called The Sheriff’s Benefit Concert, an attempt to raise funds for the problems faced by prisoners.

Neil Young, perhaps emphasizing his independence from the other three, doesn’t come onstage until the fifth number:

Setlist:
0:00:00 - Helplessly Hoping
0:04:31 - Wooden Ships
0:10:16 - Blackbird
0:13:36 - As I Come Of Age
0:16:42 - Neil joins in…
0:19:03 - Roll Another Number (For the Road)
0:23:39 - Human Highway
0:27:32 - New Mama
0:33:13 - And So It Goes
0:38:01 - Prison Song
0:42:48 - Long Time Gone
0:51:02 - Change Partners

 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Hear the Beach Boys sing ‘Good Vibrations’ without the music
04.18.2016
05:56 pm

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Music

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“Wilson’s instinctive talents for mixing sounds could most nearly equate to those of the old painters whose special secret was in the blending of their oils. And what is most amazing about all outstanding creative artists is that they are using only those basic materials which are freely available to everyone else.”—Derek Taylor, music business publicist

Brian Wilson and the Beach Boys’ “Good Vibrations,” reportedly cost somewhere between $50,000 and $75,000 in mid-60s dollars (That would be between $360,000 and $550,000 today). Laid down with the finest studio musicians in Hollywood—known, of course, as the Wrecking Crew—the sessions used over 90 hours of magnetic recording tape. It was at the time the largest sum of money ever spent on a single song. The whole of the Beach Boys’ Pet Sounds album had cost $70,000 ($510,000 in today’s terms), which itself was considered an unusually high cost for a longplayer.
 

 
Although I was planning to write up something about the recording history of the Beach Boys’ “Good Vibrations,” after getting lost in the weeds of the incredibly authoritative and detailed Wikipedia page—which I highly recommend—I decided that this just wasn’t possible. I’ll simply send you there for the exhaustive history. No point in giving the making of a masterpiece short shrift. I did notice a few bits of minutiae in the entry however, which might prove of interest to our readers who like the Beach Boys but who are not absolute Beach Boys fanatics, because they will already know this stuff.
 

 
First off, there was no “proper” stereo version of “Good Vibrations.” The reason for this is was the loss of the multitrack tapes of the vocals, which were probably tossed out by Capitol Records. In 2012 a stereo/mono release of Smiley Smile included a Brian Wilson-approved stereo mix for the first time, when a technology invented by Irish engineer Dr. Derry Fitzgerald was used to separate each instrument and each voice, allowing for a “stereo extraction” remix for the first time from the mono master. (You can watch a video about Dr. Fitzgerald’s work on “Good Vibrations” here.)

Here is that 2012 stereo mix. I’d never heard it before. It’s pretty neat.

 
And then I found THIS:
 

 
You feel privileged for having heard that, now don’t you? I know I sure do.

Second, in the part about the marketing of the single, it describes the various promotional films relating to “Good Vibrations” made in 1966, like the Monkees-esque romp shot in a Los Angeles fire house by future famed cinematographer Caleb Deschanel.

Read more after the jump…

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
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