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8-Bit version of Slint’s ‘Good Morning, Captain’
01.27.2012
03:31 pm

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Amusing
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If you’re a fan of Slint, you’re either going to love or hate this 8-bit version of ” Good Morning, Captain.”

The Nintendo-style version of the Spiderland album cover is a nice touch, too.

YouTuber methodairmoshpit admits, “I’m a nerd with too much time on my hands.”
 

 
Thank you Jeff Albers!

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Atom Heart Mother: Pink Floyd live in Saint Tropez, 1970
01.27.2012
01:01 pm

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1970 Pink Floyd set from French television program, Pop 2. The band was shot live at the “Saint Tropez Festival de Musique” on August 8th, 1970.

Le set list:
Atom Heart Mother
The Embryo
Green is the Colour
Careful with that Axe, Eugene
Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun

Nick Mason is really, really amazing in this set. He’s on fire here.
 

 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
An hour of Leonard Cohen performing live in Austin in 1988
01.27.2012
02:03 am

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Art
Heroes
Music
Superstar
Thinkers

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Leonard Cohen’s new album Old Ideas is being released next Tuesday. The critical reception has been ecstatic. Which thrills me because I have loved Cohen from the moment I heard “Suzanne” when I was 15 years old. He’s been a massive influence on my own music. My debt to him is deep.

Here’s something to hold you Cohen fans over until Old Ideas release: a brilliant performance by Mr. Cohen on Austin City Limits from 1988.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Beatbox champ does killer version of MGMT’s ‘Kids’
01.26.2012
03:32 pm

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Did the world really need a cover of MGMT’s “Kids?” I say yes…as long as it’s this damned groovy.

From the debut album Future Loops by Britain’s Radio 1 Beatbox Champion THePETEBOX.

The track was recorded live in one take.

Future Loops will be released on April 12.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Armageddon rock: The very metal sound of The Osmonds
01.26.2012
01:12 pm

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Amusing
Environment
Music
Pop Culture

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Dangerous Minds’ reader Rhodri turned me on to this slowed down (from 45 r.p.m to 33 r.p.m) version of The Osmonds’ “Crazy Horses.” A pretty great rock song has now become a monolithic slab of heavy metal with Cookie Monster vocals.

I added some video as eye candy and I think it works quite nicely.

Armageddon rock from America’s favorite Mormons. Considering the song is about the deadly effects of automobile pollution, this slooooowed down version is suitably doom-laden.
 

 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Gospel singer answers the question ‘What does hell sound like?’
01.25.2012
11:12 pm

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Amusing
Belief
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I’ll let the video speak for itself. Just prepare yourself for a most ungodly sound.

Jesus wept.
 

 
Via Gothaze.com

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
I wanna be your frog: The heaviest French rock band you never heard of
01.25.2012
07:55 pm

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Pop Culture
Punk

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This may be the coolest thing to come out of France since Francoise Hardy. Fuck Daft Punk and M83… and Plastic Bertrand. Soggy was a French heavy rock band from the early 1980s who managed to channel the spirit of MC5 and The Stooges in ways that few bands have managed to do as convincingly as these dudes. And did I mention they’re French?

Soggy was founded in 1978 on the ashes of obscure rock bands from Reims (Woman Bleed, Antechrist, Hardfuckers, ). Starting with covers of Alice Cooper, Black Sabbath, MC5, and the Stooges, the band quickly wrote its own material and developed a unique style mixing Hard Rock and Punk Rock in a Stooges vein self labeled “Hard Wave” to make fun of journalists who had labeled them “Hard Rock” and even “New Wave”. The band rehearsed regularly, recorded its own tracks on many occasions (while rehearsing and in the studio). They hired a huge technical staff, organized their own tours in the Champagne-Ardenne region, but also ventured to Paris (Gibus, Golf Drouot), and even Germany, Belgium, Holland and Switzerland.

The bands professionalism along with their legendary burst of energy on stage eventually gained media coverage in Best (october 1980) and with this came the opportunity to record the tracks “Waiting For The War” and “47 Chromosomes” in Paris (Florida studio) in April 1981. With the release of a self produced single (reaching the 5th highest sale in their regions biggest record shop) and with a video of “Waiting for the war” shot for the TV channel FR3 Reims, the end of May that year signifies the highpoint in the bands career. Approached by several major record labels for the release of a whole album, but when asked to sing in French (an offer they systematically turnED down), the band was destined to remain unsigned. After more than a hundred concerts, the band split up in July 1982, although they were supposed to play the opening act for the Judas Priest European tour.

Beb - Vocals
Eric Dars - Guitars
François Tailleur - Bass
Olivier Hennegrave - Drums

This is a prelude to a video megamix of French hard rock that I will posting in the next few days. Watch for it.

Beb, Rob Tyner wants his hair back.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Captain Beefheart and his Magic Band: ‘Pachuco Cadaver,’ 1969
01.25.2012
02:33 pm

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Heroes
Music

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I’m pretty sure that this wasn’t an “official” music video for “Pachuco Cadaver,” but having said that, this song was the sole single to be pulled from Trout Mask Replica, albeit only in France, so it very well could be.

I’m not really sure what this is. Maybe it’s just a fan-produced video, I don’t know. Here’s all it says on YouTube:

Edited by Nuno Monteiro. Filmed February 1969. Featuring Captain Beefheart, Zoot Horn Rollo, Rockette Morton, Antennae Jimmy Semens.

 

 
Thank you, Elixer Sue!

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
The only film footage of blues/folk legend Leadbelly
01.25.2012
12:11 am

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History
Movies
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Although the audio was prerecorded and Leadbelly is lip-synching,Three Songs By Leadbelly is the only performance footage of Leadbelly (aka Lead Belly) in existence. Hard to believe that someone of his stature was so under-represented in the world of film. He died in 1949, more than a half a century after Louis Lumiere’s creation of the first motion picture.

The three pieces of films strung together for this film originated as a folklore research film in 1945, shot by Blanding Sloan and Wah Ming Chang, then edited by Pete Seeger of The Weavers.

The one-reeler is a mite over ten minutes of which 8 minutes is the research footage. It opens with shots of the rural south & of the Shilo Baptist Church in Morningsport, Louisiana, with Leadbelly on the soundtrack humming & strumming the plaintive “Where Did You Sleep Last Night?” behind the opening credits.

Seeger recounts: “I think that [cameraman Blanding Stone] recorded Leadbelly in a studio the day before then he played the record back while Leadbelly moved his hands and lips in synch with the record. He’d taken a few seconds from one direction and a few seconds from another direction, which is the only reason I was able to edit it. I spent three weeks with a movieola, up in my barn snipping one frame off here and one frame off there and juggling things around. I was able to synch up three songs: ‘Grey Goose’, ‘Take This Hammer’ and ‘Pick a Bale of Cotton’”

Here’s “Three Songs By Leadbelly” in all of its faded glory.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Three songs and a short film by Marc Campbell
01.24.2012
09:22 pm

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Movies
Music

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I was in New Orleans for the past couple of weeks and while I was there I visited Cypress Grove and St. Louis Cemeteries and shot some video and film footage. I combined that footage with some clips from some older films, including Alucarda, Tilly Losch and The Dance Of Her Hands, Danse Serpentine and vintage burlesque to create a short film. It’s raw and spontaneous and owes a bit of a debt to film makers I admire like Kenneth Anger and Stan Brakhage. Of course, they are masters and I am not.

The soundtrack is composed of three songs from my album Tantric Machine (release date: May 2012). The album will be a two-disc affair containing 24 songs and some videos. The recording sessions were produced by Hugh Pool and involved the use of old microphones, synthesizers, rhythm machines and effects boxes. I wanted the project to sound like it was recorded with instruments that had turn to rust - something ancient and yet modern.

As I sang some of the tunes, I found my voice going into a place it hadn’t really gone before. My Texas roots emerged and a “country” feel entered the songs. I made no effort to sing like a hillbilly convict. It just happened. I also tapped into my French side. The result is some kind of weird hybrid that sounds like music for a Gallic spaghetti western with some LSD thrown in. None of this was planned. I was taken by surprise and that’s what I love about making things.

Tantric Machine has been a long time coming. Not because of the time spent recording it, but because of my reticence to get back into the music business. Now that the music business is barely a business anymore, I’ve returned to seeing music in the way that I saw it when I started my first punk band in 1976; something that I do out of love.

Songs:
“Already Dead”
“The Night Goes On”
“Strangled By Flowers”

Thanks for indulging a musician who still heeds the voice of the Muse when she comes calling. Or as Jack Spicer called it (and I’m paraphrasing), “the Martian that re-arranges the furniture in your head.”

Contains brief nudity.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
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