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Kate Middleton jelly bean could be worth £500
04.14.2011
04:37 am

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From The Telegraph:

Wesley Hosie, 25, found the yellow and red sweet by chance as he and his girlfriend tucked into a 700g jar from The Jelly Bean Factory.

Mr Hosie and girlfriend Jessica White, 24, from Taunton, Somerset, kept the mango-flavoured bean and now plan to sell it on eBay for £500.

Mr Hosie said: “As Jessica opened the jar, I saw her immediately. She was literally lying there staring back at me.”

Tasty!

Posted by Niall O'Conghaile | Leave a comment
Guy Peellaert the ‘Michelangelo of Pop Art’
04.13.2011
06:24 pm

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Art
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The late Belgian painter Guy Peellaert (1934-2008) was once called the “Michelangelo of Pop Art” for his amazing photo-realist style. Famous for his iconic album covers for David Bowie’s Diamond Dogs and It’s Only Rock and Roll for the Stones, Peeleart was also noted for his legendary million-selling coffee-table book, Rock Dreams, a collaboration with British rock writer writer Nik Cohn. Rock Dreams featured 125 paintings by Peellaert of rockstars ranging from Frank Sinatra to Lou Reed in (often lurid) fantasy settings. It was something you’d see often in head shops in the 1970s. Many of the paintings are owned by Jack Nicholson.
 
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Rock Dreams is a special favorite of mine. I’ve had a copy since childhood that I got from the Columbia House Record Club when I joined for a penny. One day in the late 80s, I came across a huge pile of hardback copies at the Strand Bookstore in NYC for $1 each. I bought the entire stack and gave them out as Christmas presents that year. It’s one of the best art books I’ve ever, ever seen.
 
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Less well-known are Peellaert’s sexy 60s posters for Paris strip club The Crazy Horse Saloon (I used to have a few, but the tube they were kept in got lost during a NYC to LA move) and his books The Adventures of Jodelle (one of my most prized possessions) and Pravda with its title character based on gorgeous Francoise Hardy. (“Jodelle” had been modeled on French pop singer Sylvie Vartan). Below a super cool “Pravda” animation that Peellaert did in 2001 featuring a soundtrack by The Rolling Stones, Missy Elliot and Joy Division.
 

 
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Even less well-known is the animated opening credits for Peellaert did for 1967’s Jeu de Massacre. (He also did the poster, too, obviously). Revel in New York describes it like this:
 

Two cartoonists meet a playboy who lives out the fantasies created in their cartoons. He hires them to create a new comic strip. As they work on the new strip, the playboy begins to live it out. Unfortunately, the new strip deals with murder.

 
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Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Charles Laufer creator of Tiger Beat magazine R.I.P.
04.12.2011
06:17 pm

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Charles Laufer creator of Tiger Beat magazine has died.

For teenyboppers of the 1960s Tiger Beat magazine spoke to them loud and clearly about the things they loved the most: pop stars, cute boys, fashion and rock and roll. With its colorful covers and bold poster-like graphics, Tiger Beat was a gateway magazine to Creem and Rolling Stone.

Charles Laufer, who as a high school teacher in 1955 despaired that his students had nothing entertaining to read and responded with magazines aimed at teenage girls desperate to know much, much more about the lives of their favorite cute stars, died April 5 in Northridge, Calif. He was 87.

Mr. Laufer’s best-known magazine was Tiger Beat, published monthly. With its spinoff publications and its competitors, of which the most popular was 16 Magazine, Tiger Beat had it all covered — or at least what mattered most to girls from about 8 to 14. The Beach Boys’ loves! Jan and Dean’s comeback! The private lives of the Beatles!”

While The Beatles and Beach Boys sold magazines, it was The Monkees that put Tiger Beat on the map and turned it into a profitable enterprise.

Recognizing the Monkees’ potential, he put them on the cover of Tiger Beat. That put the still-struggling publication in the black, and he signed an exclusive deal for special Monkee magazines, Monkee picture books and Monkee love beads, which added to the bonanza.”

 
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Tiger Beat looked like pop music sounded, fun!
 
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Obituary at the New York Times.

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Deborah Vankin signs ‘Poseurs’ at Meltdown Comics
04.12.2011
03:47 pm

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For the past ten years, Los Angeles Times staff reporter Deborah Vankin has covered arts, culture and nightlife for the LA Weekly, Variety, Brand X and the New York Times. She has a special talent for observing and commenting on youth culture in particular.

Poseurs, her new grapic novel, is set amongst restless fashion tribes of Los Angeles and there will be a signing tomorrow night celebrating the publication of the book at LA’s premiere geek emporium, Meltdown Comics.

Vankin told the LA Weekly:

The crux of the story is that a shy, artsy teenage girl gets a part-time job as a “houseguest for hire.” She’s hired by this agency called “We The Party People” who rent out fake guests for peoples’ private parties. Why? Image is everything in L.A., you are who you know. They help “flesh out” the guest list. Thing is: you never know who’s real and who’s rented. Drama ensues.

Buy Poseurs on Amazon

Meltdown Comics, April 13th, 2011 7pm, 7522 Sunset Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 9004

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Iggy Pop action figure
04.11.2011
12:24 pm

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I think this is kind of cool, but I question the wisdom of choosing to immortalize the Iggster at 64-years of age rather than 24? 

This I can pass on, though had they gone with a Raw Power-era Iggy in his silver pants, I’d have bought it without hesitation…

Pre-order your Iggy Pop action figure from Toys R Us, it’ll ship in early June.

Below, Iggy smears himself in peannut butter at the Cincinnati Summer Pop Festival of 1970. Scroll in about two minutes for the Stooges mayhem to start:
 

 
Thank you Chris Musgrave!

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Woody Woodpecker: Bird of the absurd
04.11.2011
12:28 am

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There’s a fascinating article in the New York Times, That Noisy Woodpecker Had an Animated Secret, about Shamus Culhane, a pioneer of modern animation, who slipped homages to avant-garde artists into several Woody Woodpecker cartoons in the 1940s.

Sixteen years ago Tom Klein was staring at a Woody Woodpecker cartoon, The Loose Nut, when he started seeing things. Specifically, Mr. Klein watched that maniacal red-topped bird smash a steamroller through the door of a shed. The screen then exploded into images that looked less like the stuff of a Walter Lantz cartoon than like something Willem de Kooning might have hung on a wall.

“What was that?” Mr. Klein, now an animation professor at Loyola Marymount University, recalled thinking. Only later, after years of scholarly detective work, did he decide that he had been looking at genuine art that was cleverly concealed by an ambitious and slightly frustrated animation director named Shamus Culhane.”

Culhane was an admirer of experimental film makers, Eisenstein in particular, as well as abstract painters and managed to work some of his artistic obsessions into his commercial work.

High art meets popular art inThe Loose Nut when Woody “is blown into an abstract configuration…a convergence of animation and Soviet montage.”
 

 
In lowbrow mode, Culhane enjoyed pranking Universal Studios and Walt Lantz by throwing not-so-subtle sexual imagery into his cartoons. In The Greatest Man In Siam, Culhane’s libido goes nuts in a veritable onslaught of genitalia. You don’t need to be Freud to notice the erect phalluses and vaginal doorways. At the 4:36 point in the clip, there’s a glimpse of a pink passageway that incorporates both yin and yang.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
The Voluptuous Horror of Karen Black: ‘Bring Back the Night’
04.09.2011
04:16 pm

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Punk

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Above, artist Kembra Pfahler and friend.

Glamorous new video from Dangerous Minds pal Kembra Pfahler, it’s The Voluptuous Horror of Karen Black’s new song “Bring Back the Night.” Directed by Bijoux Altamirano. Might be NSFW.
 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
“A Lesson for My Republican Colleagues Courtesy of the White Stripes”
04.08.2011
03:53 pm

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Rep. Donna F. Edwards of Maryland dropped some deep-cut White Stripes lyrics today on the House floor. Nicely done.
 

 
I’ve never been a huge fan of TWS but the original is pretty nifty sounding.
 

 
Thanks Ned Raggett !

Posted by Brad Laner | Leave a comment
Pete Townshend’s nauseating PSA for The United States Air Force during the Vietnam War
04.07.2011
06:02 pm

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History
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Stupid or Evil?

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Pete Townshend recorded this radio commercial for the United States Air Force while the Vietnam War was raging. U.S. troop levels had reached 463,000 with 16,000 combat deaths to date. Hundreds of thousands of Vietnamese civilians had been killed by this point. Were any of them happy, Jack?

The upbeat tone of the music and Townshend’s inane and utterly clueless inducement to “fly the skies, touch the moon and reach for the stars” reduces the Vietnam nightmare to a fairytale vision out of The Little Prince. “It’s a great place to be”...unless you’re on the ground deep-fried in napalm.

I always knew Pete Townshend had his head up his ass I just didn’t realize how far.
 

 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
James Bidgood’s sumptuous and subversive ‘Pink Narcissus’, 1971
04.07.2011
03:51 pm

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Art
Movies
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Queer
Sex

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The film was credited to ‘Anonymous’, which led some to think it was by Andy Warhol, and others, Kenneth Anger. The mix of kitsch and beautiful imagery pointed to both, however, they were wrong. For years no one knew who had made Pink Narcissus, that was until the writer Bruce Benderson became obsessed with this subversively erotic film and decided to track down its director - James Bidgood.

Shot on Super-8, Pink Narcissus is a sumptuous film that depicts the erotic fantasies of a gay male prostitute (Bobby Kendall), as he visualizes himself in various homage to “gay whack-off fantasies”.

Bidgood arrived in New York in 1951, where he worked as a female impersonator, hairdresser, set designer and then photographer. Bidgood started taking pix for Adonis and Muscleboy, but was at first disappointed with the results, as he told the New York Times:

“There was no art,” Bidgood laments. “They were badly lit and uninteresting. Playboy had girls in furs, feathers and lights. They had faces like beautiful angels. I didn’t understand why boy pictures weren’t like that.”

So, Bidgood made his own erotic tableaux, which mixed beauty and kitsch. His first Watercolors presented a young man swimming through a fabulous, shimmering grotto - all of which he built and photographed in his cramped apartment, as he explained to Butt magazine:

“Models were not that easy to find especially for the kind of work I was doing which called for more of the subject’s time than a pose or two wearing less than two square inches of jersey and some elastic and leaning against some fagelas elaborate mantelpiece. In the time I needed to do one shot they could turn ten tricks. And there weren’t all that many great beauties around willing to be photographed nude or semi nude in homoerotic situations. Remember this was before being gay and/or being a ‘male escort’ or pornography, quasi or otherwise, were as acceptable or mainstream as they are now.”

Bidgood had his own distinct style, which later inspired the careers of Pierre et Giles, and David La Chappelle.

From this Bidgood started work on Pink Narcissus, which he shot in his Hell’s Kitchen apartment, between 1963 and 1971. Again, Bidgood designed and made the sets, provided the make-up and costume, and used the neighborhood hustlers as his cast. It was an incredible undertaking, and one that eventually led his frustrated backers to take the film from Bidgood and finish it themselves. And this was why Bidgood took his name off the finished film.  

“See, why I took my name off of it was that I was protesting, which I’d heard at the time that’s what you did…. I’d take my name off and then they’d go “Mr. Bidgood took his name off because…” But it turns out they kept me in the closet, and all you had to do was ask anybody who’s been in it and they’d say, you know, “Jim did this.” It wasn’t like a big mystery, but you would have thought, and then years later I was ‘outed’.”

 



 
Previously on DM

Early Gay Cinema: Jean Genet’s ‘Un Chant d’Amour’


 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
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