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Happy Birthday David Bowie: Ziggy turns 65
01.08.2012
12:19 pm

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As you are no doubt already well aware from multiple postings on your Facebook wall, David Bowie officially became a senior citizen today.

I have to admit that I was saddened by reading what The Guardian’s killjoy, Alexis Petridis, had to say about this milestone:

It’s a cliche when a rock star reaches 65 to mention the time when it didn’t look like they’d make pensionable age, but with David Bowie who marks the milestone on Sunday, it’s almost unavoidable. Look at a picture of him in the mid-70s, when he was ravaged by cocaine, living off a diet of red peppers and milk and so paranoid that he apparently kept his own urine in a fridge lest persons unknown steal it: this is not a man destined to make old bones.

It wasn’t just the drugs: there was something about the intensity with which he worked during that decade - the scarcely-believable ten-year creative streak that begins with the 1970s The Man Who Sold The World and ends with the 1980’s Scary Monsters And Super-Creeps – that suggests an early demise. Someone that burns that brightly probably isn’t going to burn for long.

Under the circumstances, it’s hard to begrudge him his ongoing semi-retirement: he last made an album in 2003, and for the best part of a decade has made only sporadic public appearances, the odd special guest spot here and there. It was precipitated by emergency surgery on a blocked artery, and lurid rumours about the state of his health have abounded ever since.

Ouch. The idea of a world without David Bowie (even if he’s not in the public eye much these days) is something I’ve never really contemplated. Thanks a bunch, Guardian, for ruining my morning!

Well, if you’re in a more celebratory mood, you can trawl through the Bowie-related back items here on Dangerous Minds. I daresay our Bowie posts here gather up some of the very best Bowie-related multi-media you’re going to find out there.

In England—well, in Brixton at least—they’ve put him on the currency, a proper tribute for a local lad (insane).

And here’s an oblique treat, a very different take on “Golden Years” as performed by Peter Glaze and Jan Hunt on the BBC childrens show, Crackerjack, in 1976:
 

 
Thank you Paul Gallagher, for that crazy clip…

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
9 Seconds of Iggy vs. The Thin White Duke
01.07.2012
07:12 pm

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‘Hello, I’m David Bowie. Make way for the Homo Superior.’

Find similar here.
 

 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
‘Frank Film’: A life story told in 11,592 photographs
01.07.2012
12:06 am

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An autobiographical narrative, a list of words beginning with the letter “f” and 11,592 photos collected over the course of several years are the components in Frank Film, a hypnotic visual and sonic film experiment directed by Frank Mouris in 1973.

In less than nine minutes an amazing amount of information is communicated opening a door into the life of the film maker and modern culture’s mind at large.  
 

 

 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Ed Sanders’ brain-groping memoir is a real mindfugger


 
One of the defining moments of my life was when I picked up the debut album by The Fugs in a People’s Drug Store in Falls Church, Virginia in 1966. And when I say “picked up” that’s exactly what I mean. I didn’t even have to listen to it. All it took was picking up the album and looking at the cover to have my 15-year-old mind scrambled forever. A grainy black and white photograph of five scruffy-looking hippies holding musical instruments standing among rubble in front of an ancient looking brick wall somewhere in NY City’s East Village was not your usual teenybopper rock and roll imagery. If parents didn’t want their daughters to marry a Rolling Stone, they wouldn’t want them within 20 square miles of a Fug. This was punk rock in beatnik drag. Ten years later The Ramones would release their first album with a similarly New Yorkish cover. I stared at The Fugs with the awe of a kid coming upon a creature from outer space.

Of course, I bought the record (along with a copy of the first Mothers Of Invention album, Freak Out) and went home and eagerly put it on the turntable. The rest, as they say, is history. The Fugs were the hippest thing I’d yet encountered on vinyl. Their mix of the sacred and the profane, poetry and street talk, beauty and coarseness, was intellectual and spiritual manna for my hungry teenage brain and heart.

I wanted to be a part of whatever world The Fugs existed in so I ended up taking a bus to New York City and immediately went to The Fugs’ co-founder Ed Sanders’ bookstore, Peace Eye. There I began my serious Beat education, thumbing through the pages of books by Michael McClure, Alexandra David-Neel, Ginsberg, Burroughs, Kerouac, the whole underground scene…and it was still relatively underground at the time.

(While writing this I’m listening to the hugely underrated Fugs’ psychedelic/folk-rock masterpiece It Crawled Into My Hand, Honest .)

As much of a Fugs fan as I was, what eventually really knocked me out was Ed Sanders’ prose and poetry. He had a Whitmanesque/Blakean vision and bardic style coupled with gutter humor that bridged the heavens above and the mud below. He could undercut literary pretense with the foul-mouthed rants of a heavy-maned hillbilly cranked up on a ten dollar bag of crystal meth. His beatnik/hippie sensibilities were the foil to his truckstop cowboy skepticism. In other words, Sanders knew how to yin his yang, keeping the whole beautiful cosmic mess balanced between words of worship and the laughter on the tongue of a drunken whore. Within his howling vowels and clanging consonants, Sanders located that strange geography where the mythic mingles with tabloid headlines and TV commercials, where Jimmie Rodgers knocks back cheap bourbon while staring at the reflections of Isis and Ra in the bottom of his shot glass.

Drink up oh mighty yodellers and scribblers who praise the Dharma. The truth that envelopes us all and sends us squealing like delirious pigs into the arms of unbearable bliss is upon us like an ambergris-scented robe made of the pubic hair of two thousand and twelve Aztec virgins. Get naked, now! Or get the fuck out!

Yes, Ed Sanders was my guru of the gobble grope, my slum God of the Lower East Side, the dopethrill psychopath who pointed the way to a place where there is no shame in the flesh, the fuck or the flame that ignites the holy sacraments of the good lord Ganja. With Sanders as my shamanic guide I became a full-fledged member of the skin flower army, bravely facing the future with my hair flapping in the wind, a flag made of a million love tendrils.

That was then, this is now. And it is with great pleasure that I share with you good news indeed. The almighty Fug and editor of “Fuck You: A Magazine of The Arts,” has published a new memoir, Fug You, that covers his early days as a peacenik, poet, rabble rouser and musician in New York during the Sixties. It’s a great read full of fascinating anecdotes, essential counter-culture history, downtown bohemia, wrangles with the law, appearances by hundreds (yes, hundreds) of Sixties’ icons including Jimi Hendrix, Andy Warhol, Frank Zappa, Kenneth Anger, The Velvet Underground and tons of photos, images and manuscripts from his archives.

Unlike many a chronicler of those stoned days, Sanders has kept his wits about him. This isn’t a wobbly sentimental journey. The writing is sharp, witty and full of precise detail and facts. Of course, who would expect less of the author responsible for one of the best (and darkest) non-fiction books on the Aquarian Age, The Family. Sanders has always shown an abiding respect for form and tradition, even when fucking with them. Fug You is not only a personal history, it is history in the big sense. It is one of the few books that deals with the hippies and the counter-culture from the inside that doesn’t read like an amnesiac trying to reconstruct a past life or a brain-addled Deadhead recalling the time he caught the clap in a crash pad in the Haight as he desperately tries to keep his drool cup from toppling off his beer gut. Or worse, those guilt-ridden confessionals by former junkies who used to play in hair bands. Sanders doesn’t sound like an old fart spinning tales or pathetically trying to revive the good old days.

What kept Sanders interesting from the very beginning is still very much in operation in this new book: the clarity of his bullshit detector and his irreverent take on virtually everything, including himself. Which is not to say he doesn’t care about things in a deep sense, he does. He just approaches life with a Zen perspective knowing that getting overamped over shit ain’t gonna change a thing. He continues to be a revolutionary with a sense of the ridiculous. His strategy has always been to see the absurdity in the horror show and to shine a cosmic light on it. We see the Fug and Abbie Hoffman style of revolutionary theater echoed in today’s Occupy Movement. When The Fugs went to Virginia to levitate the Pentagon in 1967 not everybody was laughing, but they were certainly paying attention.

“You ask about my philosophy, baby, yeah? Dope, peace, magic gods in the tree trunks, and GROUP GROPE, BABY!”

The book ends in 1970, so I’m hoping this is the first in a series. More than four decades after I first encountered him, Sanders is still manna for my hungry brain.

Fug You: An Informal History of the Peace Eye Bookstore, the Fuck You Press, the Fugs, and Counterculture in the Lower East Side
is available here.

Here’s a little video mashup of some vintage film footage with selections from Sanders’ ode to rednecks, hippies and the trailer parks of absolute reality, Sanders’ Truckstop.

1. “Jimmy Joe, The Hippybilly Boy”   2. “Maple Court Tragedy”     3. “Heartbreak Crash Pad”     4. “Banshee”     5. “Plaster Song”     6. “Iliad”
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Trailer for ‘Bikini Blitzkrieg’
01.06.2012
03:52 pm

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Director Fred Neuen nails the girls with guns grindhouse vibe with this trailer for Bikini Blitzkrieg.

A lot of care went into the production of this preview for a film that doesn’t exist…yet.

In hidden labs, scattered across Europe, the Nazis have been building secret weapons, to tip the scale in World War 2…. they failed… until a group of bikini-models, shooting a gun-nut video in the middle of nowhere reactivate dormant Doomsday-devices… Hot Girls & Guns, Nazi-Zombies, Robots, Drones and Super Powers! It’s… “BIKINI BLITZKRIEG”!

Neuen shot the short film in two days. Post-production took a year with Neuen footing the bill and working on the project in his spare time.

Neuen is using this video as a lure for investors. Looks like a good fit with Troma.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Very cool vintage photos of rock stars found at a swap meet
01.05.2012
02:55 am

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History
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David Bowie and Ronnie Spector.
 
Jim Laspesa is a musician and hardcore rock and roll archivist who has been a source for quite a few of my groovier posts here on Dangerous Minds. Well, Jim has done it again. He’s been sharing some photos on his Facebook page that he came across a few years ago at a swap meet in Pasadena, California. These uncredited photos capture some of rock’s biggest stars at the zenith of their celestial ascent.

A case of somebody (or somebodies) being in the right place at the right time. Amateur, pro? Who knows?
 

Jimmy Page and John Bonham in a bathrobe.
 
More snaps after the jump…

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Phil Lynott: A ‘treasure trove’ of 700 Thin Lizzy songs to be released
01.04.2012
06:49 pm

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Twenty-six years ago today, Ireland’s greatest rock star Phil Lynott died. The singer passed away from heart failure and pneumonia after an ‘11 day fight for his life’, at the Salisbury Hospital in Wiltshire, England.

It was a sad day. But this year it can be commemorated with the incredible news that a “treasure trove” of 700 songs, stashed away by Lynott, will be released in June year. The Belfast Telegraph reports:

Shortly before he passed away in 1986, Mr Lynott gave 150 tapes to a third party for safekeeping. The cache of up to 700 songs has finally been released to record company Universal Music.

“This is an absolutely stunning find,” Steve Hammonds, project manager behind the new Thin Lizzy box set, told the Irish Independent.

“In every group there’s a member who lovingly collects their recordings and in Thin Lizzy that was Phil Lynott, because Lizzy was his baby and his band.”

It will be the second boxed set in recent times to feature archive work by the band, following last year’s ‘Live At The BBC’ release.

But the newly unearthed recordings stretch from Thin Lizzy’s years with Decca Records, beginning in 1971, to their ‘Renegade’ album in 1981.

“There are out-takes, unheard versions of Thin Lizzy hits and, most exciting of all, material which was recorded but never released at the time,” said Mr Hammonds.

“Phil Lynott was such a prolific songwriter. He recorded 12 Thin Lizzy albums, two solo albums, along with his Grand Slam post-Lizzy project, and now we find he had even more songs in his drawer.”

However, Thin Lizzy members Scott Gorham and Brian Downey will have the “final say” over which songs are released.

“The members of Thin Lizzy are fully involved with this project. We have been sending them tapes of what we’ve found and respecting their wishes as regards the material being issued and the art work,” added Mr Hammonds.

Label bosses have declined to give more details on why the material is only surfacing now, 30 years after Thin Lizzy split.

“Phil Lynott passed the material on to a third party for safekeeping. They held on to it for decades because they were waiting for the right people to come along.

“They really didn’t trust anyone enough to release it properly. The catalyst was a boxed set of Thin Lizzy BBC sessions we issued earlier this year, which made them believe we were the right people. No money has changed hands, this person is a Thin Lizzy fan.”

In memory of the great man, here’s Phil Lynott and his band Thin Lizzy Behind the Music
 

 
Previously on Dangerous Minds

The Rocker, the legend: The Phil Lynott Story

‘Bad Reputation’: Excellent Thin Lizzy Documentary

Thin Lizzy vs. The Pixies: The Boys Are Back in Heaven


 
Via Brooklyn Vegan
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Pop Stars in Drag
01.03.2012
07:16 pm

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Music
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A selection of pop’s bold in beautiful in drag.
 
roy_harper_robert_plant
Robert Plant and Roy Harper.
 
annie_lennox_whose
Annie Lennox in “Who’s That Girl?”
 
 
Previously on Dangerous Minds

Film footage of The Rolling Stones in drag from 1966


 
More beautiful people after the jump…
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Jimi Hendrix performing at the Fillmore East on New Year’s Eve 1969
12.31.2011
10:58 pm

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Jimi and Band Of Gypsies play a scorching version of “Fire” on New Year’s Eve 1969 at the Fillmore in New York City.

Buddy Miles on drums. Billy Cox playing bass.

Happy New Year!
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Blondie: Live on German TV from 1977
12.31.2011
08:15 pm

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Music
Pop Culture
Punk
Television

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blondie_1977
 
To get in the New Year mood, here’s Blondie performing live on groovy German pop show Musikladen from 1977.

01. “X-Offender”
02. “Detroit 422”
03. “A Shark in Jet’s Clothing”
04. “In the Sun”
06. “Fan Mail”
06. “Little Girl Lies”
07. “Rifle Range”
08. “Cautious Lip”
09. “Contact in Red Square’
10. “Kung Fu Girls”
11. “Goldfinger”
 

 
Previously on Dangerous Minds

The Stranglers, Blondie and Sex Pistols: Awesome live footage from 1977


 
More poptastic moments with Blondie, after the jump…
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
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