follow us in feedly
Lobotomy: LA’s greatest unknown punk rock fanzine, 1978
03.03.2016
01:48 pm

Topics:
Media
Music
Pop Culture
Punk

Tags:

kjtvi
 
Just when you thought that you have seen it all, there always seems to be just one more thing. Sometimes the universe saves the best for last, like Lobotomy: The Brainless Magazine, which was founded in Hollywood during the spring 1978 by Pleasant Gehman.

The Xeroxed fanzine became notorious in the Hollywood punk scene from its very first issue, when Kim Fowley threatened to sue 18-year-old Pleasant over the sarcastic and derogatory comments she wrote about him. Because Pleasant couldn’t afford to re-print her ‘zine, she hitchhiked or took a bus to the various record stores that carried Lobotomy and cut out the offending paragraph with scissors!

Gehman, who has written for every magazine under the sun and fronted three bands, The Screaming Sirens, The Ringling Sisters and Honk If Yer Horny, is now known sometimes as “Princess Farhana,” burlesque and belly dancing star, and is exactly as she was then: wild and hysterically funny, which are the main characteristics of her DIY “brain child,” Lobotomy. Lobotomy is the documentation of a demented teenage punk insider’s view of the early scene (mostly in Los Angeles, but also New York and London) with a MAD magazine mentality. Lobotomy had that special freak-out girl flair fueled by booze, drugs and FUN!
 
jbydiut
 
Chief photographer Theresa Kereakes, also a teenager, started her career accidentally by doing the first photo shoot for a friend’s new band…The Germs. She took countless onstage and backstage photos of The Cramps, Ramones, Blondie, Jeffrey Lee Pierce, Billy Idol, Joan Jett and many more for Lobotomy. Nearly four decades later, they’ve become some of the most recognized and iconic images of the early punk scene. This was in the wild west days of punk and publishing where none of this had any career possibilities or future and this all comes off in the text and photos. Truly done for laughs and love.

Theresa has gone on to be a real heavy hitter photographer working with David Bowie, Bob Dylan, Keith Richards and others before going on to work at Island Records and becoming a programming supervisor at VH-1 and Sirius Satellite Radio. Both Pleasant and Theresa were ticket takers at the Whiskey A Go Go in the 1970’s. You can also see her work on her blog Punk Turns 30 .
 
ybetgrt
Pleasant and Theresa, Hollywood photo booth 1978
 
jdjffdjfh
Typical night: party at Joan Jett’s house across from The Whiskey A Go Go with Brad Dunning, Lisa Curland, Pleasant, Melissa, Darby & Lorna of The Germs, Billy Idol, etc.
 
kuhtiyt
 
When I asked Pleasant how many issues there were in total, she replied “Maybe twenty?” which pretty much sums it up. She added “I was held together by Scotch tape and safety pins… I don’t really know!” Which is a perfect quote describing a perfect slice of wonderful teenage hysteria.

Keep reading after the jump…

Posted by Howie Pyro | Leave a comment
The Stranglers appear in a BBC documentary about surrealism, 1978
03.03.2016
09:48 am

Topics:
Art
Music
Punk

Tags:


George Melly (1926-2007)
 
I have a hard time picturing the Dangerous Minds reader who wouldn’t fall in love with the rakish, bisexual jazz singer and surrealist George Melly, a bon vivant who spent his life playfully defying authority, rationality and good taste. The Telegraph’s obituary included this telling incident from Melly’s career as an ordinary seaman in the Royal Navy:

... in 1947 he was dropped from a Royal Naval Command Variety Performance after Warrant Officer Perkins discovered a pile of anarchist leaflets in his locker. Since the number he had been intending to perform before the King was his own highly suggestive rendition of Frankie and Johnnie (a song that became a standard in his repertoire) it was probably as well.

 

The Stranglers c. 1977
 
When London’s Hayward Gallery held the exhibition Dada and Surrealism Reviewed in 1978, the show was the ostensible subject of BBC2’s George Melly in “The Journey” or The Memoirs of a Self-Confessed Surrealist. Demonstrating that surrealism was not an “artistic movement,” in Melly’s phrase, but a wish to transform everyday life, the TV documentary follows Melly as he walks from his North London digs to the Hayward, reminiscing about his Dadaist and surrealist comrades along the way. He shaves, eats breakfast, enters phone boxes (to dial numbers at random and declaim surrealist verse), pisses in a urinal, and bumps into the Stranglers, who happen just to be hanging around, as if it were their full-time job to stand on the street, hating the Queen. Recognizing kindred spirits, Melly salutes the band: “Long live the Stranglers!”
 

George Melly (and is that harmonica player Lew Lewis?) on the back of the Stranglers’ “Walk on By” single
 
The five musicians hit it off so well that the Stranglers invited Melly to record a song with them. It’s fun to imagine the louche session that produced “Old Codger,” a blues number about the joys of pederasty which the Stranglers released on the B-side of their Doorsified “Walk on By.” From the irritating, unreliable, and official Stranglers biography No Mercy:

‘Old Codger’ was sung by Liverpudlian jazz maestro and hep-cat, writer and broadcaster George Melly, who had recently featured the Stranglers prominently in a BBC2 documentary on the impact of surrealism on contemporary art. Suitably flattered that their activities had been endorsed by the cognoscenti (his 1972 book Revolt Into Style: the Pop Arts in Britain was one of the most influential of its day), the band asked Melly down for a spot of brandy-drinking and crooning, and he obliged with a great vocal for the ‘Old Codger’ track.

And Hugh Cornwell’s autobiography includes this scene:

Alan Yentob is making a BBC2 documentary about Dada, and George Melly asks for us to be in the programme. We appear as the inheritors of Dada, and I write a song for George to sing with us, called ‘Old Codger’ about an ageing man with an obsession with a choirboy. I show the lyrics to George and he says, ‘Very nice.’

Keep reading after the jump…

Posted by Oliver Hall | Leave a comment
LEGO Killing Joke performing ‘Requiem’
02.28.2016
12:27 pm

Topics:
Amusing
Music
Punk

Tags:


 
Killing Joke fans in North America would have seen that band on tour recently had the entire run of 26 shows supporting their new album Pylon not been summarily canceled due to unspecified “health issues.” The next chances anyone will have to see the band are a few scattered festival dates in the UK and Portugal, hardly practical travel-wise for US fans (and also, festivals blow). That’s a real downer, as Killing Joke rank up there with Wire among the very few active bands from the first wave of post-punk who still totally deliver the goodsPylon contains some quite excellent material, and the chance to take in a show would have been mighty nice.

This hardly compares to an actual Killing Joke concert, but we think you’ll agree that it’s still really great. YouTube user itsnotbennings recently uploaded an animated LEGO video for the band’s classic song “Requiem,” from their indispensable self-titled debut album, complete with custom KJ portrait mini-figures. And while the LEGOfication of freakin’ everything is getting a bit stale, we found this to be one of the more inspired examples.
 

 
Bonus: After the jump, check out Killing Joke’s recent video for “Euphoria”...

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Leave a comment
Punk rock trading cards from 1977
02.26.2016
12:09 pm

Topics:
Punk

Tags:


Jonathan Richman
 
In 1977 a Dutch company called Monty put out a set of trading cards under the name “Punk: The New Wave.” Included in the set were punk-era stalwarts like the Dictators, Blondie, Elvis Costello, the Jam, the Sex Pistols, the Clash, and the New York Dolls; Dutch acts like Gruppo Sportivo and Normaal; and a handful of acts who clearly didn’t belong in any set of punk rock cards, like Dwight Twilley and KISS.

In a package you’d get six cards and a bright pink strip of gum. The packaging looked like this:
 

 
Unfortunately, there’s no place on the Internet (until now!) where a large number of these cards can be seen, so it was necessary to grab (almost invariably rather small) images from a few dozen individual auction pages. The quality of the images leaves something to be desired, so someone out there who might own this set—upload some better scans, please!
 

Blondie
 

The Clash
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Butthole Surfer Gibby Haynes and Jesus Lizard’s David Yow star in ‘Walden Pink’
02.25.2016
08:34 am

Topics:
Movies
Music
Punk

Tags:


 
There’s a short film coming out that stars two legends of Texas punk. David Yow (of Scratch Acid, the Jesus Lizard and lately—have mercy!—Flipper) and Gibby Haynes (of the Butthole Surfers, blessèd be their name) have top billing in this good-looking black-and-white picture. This could be my generation’s The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, and I hope I don’t have to wait too long to see it.

Directed by Peter Bolte, who previously cast Yow in his 2013 feature All Roads Lead, Walden Pink appears to be a tale of existential dread. Here’s the synopsis from the Victoria TX Indie Film Fest, where the movie will premiere on March 20:

Walden Pink sits disheveled on a park bench as the world drifts by him. The rest of his day is met with one unfortunate confrontation after another by the likes of religious proselytizers, process servers, angry bartenders and abrasive barflies. These conversations only distract him from finding a peace and clarity to this repetitive and draining existence. Just as Walden’s day began, his day ends seated on a park bench in a state of bitterness and self-loathing.

In the trailer below, Haynes’ character first tries to rouse Walden (Yow) from his catatonia by singing a visionary interpretation of Billy Joel’s “Movin’ Out (Anthony’s Song).” Why does Gibby not have a podcast, a SiriusXM channel, or a sheaf of optical fiber cables wired directly into my brain? And where is David Yow’s Oscar® or Golden Globe®, Hollywood? Just whom exactly is one supposed to blow to get things done during the Kali Yuga?
 

 

Posted by Oliver Hall | Leave a comment
Naked: Iggy Pop’s eye-popping performance in see-through pants leaves little to the imagination
02.23.2016
09:12 am

Topics:
Amusing
Heroes
Music
Punk

Tags:

Iggy Pop on UK music TV show, The White Room, 1996
Iggy Pop on UK music TV show, ‘The White Room,’ 1996
 
It’s always a treat to feature a vintage performance from Iggy Pop here on Dangerous Minds, and boy do I have a doozy for you today. In 1996 Iggy paid a visit to UK music television show, The White Room...
 
An member of The White Room audience reacting to Iggy Pop's state attire
A member of “The White Room” audience reacting to what you are about to see in the video below
 
Each episode of The White Room featured a different band performing three songs in front of a live audience and according to show legend, were required to wear either black or white clothing to give the show “a serious look.” Never one to play by the rules, Iggy showed up on stage wearing plastic see-through jeans and no underwear. Because I’m pretty sure that just like shirts, underpants are of no use to Iggy Pop.

Keep reading after the jump…

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
Take a walking tour of Punk London
02.18.2016
03:49 pm

Topics:
Punk

Tags:


 
It might merely be a product of nostalgia borne of rapidly encroaching middle age, but I’m not so sure. Whenever I find myself walking around a city where I used to live all I can see are the ghosts of what used to be in the spots where certain notable and unique places once existed. Book stores, art galleries, record stores, bars, night clubs, squats, drug dens and all manner of notorious afterhours sin emporiums that have been long been replaced by artisanal mayonnaise stores, gourmet cheese shops and Chipotle. Someone younger could visit any capital city and still find much to be excited about, of course, but for someone my age, it’s more about how much better things used to be. You know, back in the day.

But I just hate being that guy pointing out “See this deli? That’s where Max’s Kansas City used to be” (And besides that, Max’s was long before my time anyway.)

But now I don’t have to be that guy, at least as far as London is concerned, I can just point “young people” towards Punk London: In The City, 1975-78, Paul Gorman and designer Mike Haddad’s walking guide to the bad old good old days of punk:

The Punk London guide:

“... charts the squats, clubs, shops and rehearsal spaces from which punk emerged and grew into a global phenomenon. It is the definitive tour of the city at a moment of febrile intensity.

Punk London takes us to Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood’s Sex shop at 430 Kings Road; the Hampstead flat shared by Johnny Rotten and Sid Vicious; Saint Martin’s School Of Art, where the Sex Pistols made their debut performance; Pathway Studios in Canonbury, where The Damned recorded “New Rose,” the first UK punk release; The Clash’s Camden Town rehearsal space and many more locations associated with all the movement’s key figures. “

 

 

 
Punk London: In The City, 1975-78 is 28 pages and includes a foldout A3 map. It’s published by Herb Lester Associates, who clearly are innovating travel guides. What’s next? Lemme guess Punk NYC?
 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Old-school ads for albums from The Clash, Buzzcocks, Blondie, T.Rex, The Jam and more
02.18.2016
09:38 am

Topics:
Advertising
Music
Punk

Tags:

Promo ad for Blondie's Plastic Records, 1978
Promo ad for Blondie’s ‘Plastic Letters,’ 1978. This might even be an in-store stand-up, hard to tell

If you are of a certain age, you will remember what it was like to get pretty much all your rock and roll knowledge from magazines. Wanted to become a part of the The Cramps Fan Club (and who didn’t), you filled out a request from a magazine or perhaps signed up for the band’s “mailing list” at a live show. If there was a new record on the way, you probably saw it on the pages of CREEM (my all-time favorite), Trouser Press or Billboard. If you were aspiring young punk in the UK, you learned likely learned about the latest record from The Jam by reading mags like Zig Zag, Sounds, and Smash Hits.
 
New York Dolls ad for Too Much Too Soon, 1974
New York Dolls ad for their 1974 album, ‘Too Much Too Soon’
 
Mick Ronson Slaughter on 10th Avenue ad, 1974
An ad for Mick Ronson’s first solo record, ‘Slaughter on 10th Avenue,’ 1974
 
Japanese ad for T-Rex records, 1974
Japanese ad for T.Rex records, 1974
 
Check them all out after the jump!

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
More never before seen early photos of the Dead Boys
02.17.2016
09:17 am

Topics:
Art
Music
Punk

Tags:


 
Last summer, it was Dangerous Minds’ extreme privilege to be the first to show the world the contents of a long-lost cache of rock history—the very first publicity photos of punk pioneers the Dead Boys, shot just after their name change from “Frankenstein,” but before the move to NYC that launched them into prominence in the year-zero CBGB scene, and ultimately into enduring infamy. The photos, by Dave Treat, an art student and close friend of the band, went almost entirely unused, as the band added bassist Jeff Magnum shortly after the shoot, quickly rendering those photos of that briefly extant four-piece lineup obsolete. Only one of them was ever published, this image of the band in an alley, which turned up in the May, 1977 issue of Rock Scene magazine. The photo was roughly recreated for the cover of the band’s debut album, Young Loud & Snotty by photographer Glenn Brown.
 

 

Clipping via rockscenester.com
 

 
That story, as it turns out, has an ongoing afterlife. Those photos were on exhibit in the Dead Boys’ original home base of Cleveland, OH, when Blondie drummer Clem Burke happened to be in town. Burke put Cleveland curator Bryon Miller in touch with L.A. gallerist Danny Fuentes of Lethal Amounts, where an expanded version of the exhibit—featuring a generous number of even more never-before-seen shots from Treat’s stash—is currently hanging through March 18, 2016, and where the few remaining copies of the show’s companion book STIV:1976 are available for sale. For highlights from the first batch, we’d refer you to our previous post on the subject.
 

 

 
More Dead Boy after the jump…

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Leave a comment
The Fall’s Mark E. Smith was on the TV news again last night. It didn’t go very well.
02.16.2016
10:52 am

Topics:
Amusing
Punk
Television

Tags:


C4 News anchor Krishnan Guru-Murthy and The Fall’s Mark E. Smith

Last night before I turned the computer off, I saw on Twitter that The Fall’s Mark E. Smith would be appearing on Channel 4 News. I made a note to myself to google this when I woke up as surely someone would have posted it by the time I rose. I was not disappointed.

An appearance by Smith on the nightly news or a sports show can often be pretty insane as everyone knows. And while the rocker is being condemned on social media this morning for some somewhat insensitive remarks he made about how all the Syrian refugees seem to be young males, it’s not that aspect of Smith’s appearance that I want to call your attention to, but rather to point out how utterly indecipherable what he’s saying—or trying to say—truly is. I normally have no trouble understanding even a thick Mancunian accent, but when Smith is speaking, it’s the matter of not merely a particularly heavy Manc accent but lots and lots (and lots) of lager. Is he slurring his words? Hell, I’m not really sure that he’s even speaking actual words. Or trying to.

And neither are the close captions that Channel 4 kindly provided convinced of this. I highly recommend turning them on. The funny thing is even when the translation is WIDELY OFF TARGET—as it is throughout the entire thing when Smith is talking—the words still come through as vintage Mark E. Smith-style angsty Cubist poetry.
 

 
For instance, “so the Fall were formed” reads “farmer farmer” on screen. “I wanted some discordant stuff—and repetition” is translated as “proud to discard and stuff and a replica weapons system.” A deaf viewer would be perplexed, but then again so would anyone else be perplexed. That dada quality is what makes it so much fun to watch MES in action. It’s just a pity this wasn’t a live interview.

But, wow, I mean, holy shit is this dude disheveled. Talk about the mileage on that body! He’s only 58, but looks like he’s 94.

The whole way he presents himself is very much like a drunk, semi-brain damaged Stephen Hawking, isn’t it?

Er… enjoy. Remember: DO turn on the captions. The new Fall EP Wise Ol’ Man will be released on February 19th by Cherry Red Records.
 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Page 3 of 115  < 1 2 3 4 5 >  Last ›