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The Bop Gun: Funkifying the universe one shot at a time
07.14.2011
06:25 pm

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The “Bop Gun” was an imaginary weapon, theorized by George Clinton, leader of Parliment, on their 1977 album, Funkentelechy vs. The Placebo Syndrome”. The “Bop Gun” would fill the being of the soulless automatons moving robotically through modern life with FUNK and dancing would be inevitable.

You’ll note that I wrote that it “was” an imaginary weapon. Now someone’s gone and built a real “Bop Gun”—it can yours for a mere $1200:

Finally the conundrum of the universes’ missing funk has an answer: BOP GUN.

5 mixed squarewave oscillators allow for rapid phase matching and total funky collapse of even the most complex wave functions!

LFO modulates filter! All oscillators, LFO and filter are controlled by global attack/decay functions at the pull of a trigger! INVERT function allows for continuous function for those situations requiring fancy long-term funkic interventions. Funkify traffic! Passers-by! Bar Mitzvahs! The sky!

LED feedback ring at the business end reacts to funk levels, providing photonic enhancement in attractive aqua green tones. Extra-sweet readout panel provides incomprehensible feedback from selected functions. Audio output jack included, and batteries fit in the handle.

 

 

 
Below, Glen Goins, the Parliament singer famous for “calling in the Mothership” during their elaborate concerts, explains the “Bop Gun” concept to this Houston crowd during a 1977 performance:
 

 
Via Nerdcore

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Hey vinyl lovers: ‘Living Stereo’ introduced by RCA, 1958
07.11.2011
10:26 pm

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RCA Victor introduces “a miracle,” their Orthophonic, high-fidelity, home stereo sound system.

Bob Banks, one-time RCA Victor marketing manager of radio sales and their Victrola division, narrates this short film introducing the RCA’s new “living stereo” records and stereophonic hi-fi gear. The year was 1958, ground zero for the birth of the “space age bachelor pad” as my pal Byron Werner so famously dubbed it.

The demonstration utilizes left and right-hand sections of orchestra married together to create the fullness of “living stereo” and gives you a stereo stylus’s POV as it travels across a record groove (“a canyon of sound!”). If you are a vinyl fan, it’s pretty fun and informative.
 

 
Via Douglas Hovey

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
His [Unspoken] Girl Friday: A no-dialogue cut of the world’s most chatty film
06.27.2011
07:25 pm

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If you’ve seen the legendary 1940 screwball comedy His Girl Friday, you’ll know why this edit clocks in at only 8 minutes. If you haven’t seen it, just know that it’s one of the fastest paced and dialogue-heavy films ever made. Director Howard Hawks made sure that Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell spoke their lines over each other as much as they possibly could because, well, that’s what people do in reality.

But all that disappears in this cut by video pro Valentin Spirik. The dialogue is completely cut out, leaving an almost hypnotic quick-cut body of jerky scene sequences layered with incidental verbal and atmospheric noise. Check it out.
 

Posted by Ron Nachmann | Leave a comment
Clothing made by chemists
06.24.2011
11:08 pm

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Advertorial
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Terylene loom.

Cyber fiber. Virtual fashions for a virtual world.

Terylene was the first wholly synthetic fiber to be invented in the UK and after it was fully launched in 1955. Terylene quickly found public favour as an alternative to wool and cotton fabric. Cloth made from Terylene kept its shape after washing and was very hardwearing, it was the most widely produced synthetic fibre. The vast ICI plants at Billingham and Wilton on Tees-side employed 30,000 people and were showcases of the new industrial Britain. ICI opened its huge chemical complex at Wilton on Tees-side in 1952 and this later became the main plant for Terylene production.”

Do not wear near an open flame.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Early example of Timeslice from 1981
06.22.2011
08:37 am

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This is descibed as “one of the earliest film[s] that experimented time-slice or bullet-time effect filming technic.” Made by Ryoichiro Debuchi using 18 still-cameras arranged in a 360 degree sweep around one central model. The footage was then transferred onto Super 8 and screened at the Pia film Festival in 1982. Quite impressive, but nothing compared to what can be achieved by Timeslice today.
 

 
Bonus Timeslice demo reel, after the jump…
 
With thanks to Richard Heslop
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Twitter In the Sixties
06.21.2011
09:35 pm

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If there had always been an Internet. See more here.

TheLizardKing Jim Morrison
Mother, I want to….

Thanks to How To Be A Retronaut

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
T-Shirt can convert sound into electricity
06.21.2011
04:42 pm

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This is quite amazing - a T-shirt that can convert music into electrical energy.

This prototype hi-tech T-shirt is called a Sound Charge and is the brainchild of global telecommunications firm Orange in collaboration with renewable energy experts Got Wind. The Sound Charge produces enough electricity to charge a cell phone, and will be debuted at the Glastonbury Festival, in England, this weekend - as explained in an Orange news release:

The eco charging device uses an existing technology in a revolutionary way; by reversing the use of a product called Piezoelectric film, allowing people to charge their mobile phones whilst enjoying their favourite headline act at Glastonbury.

Usually found in modern hi-fi speakers, an A4 panel of the modified film is housed inside a t-shirt which then acts much like an oversized microphone by ‘absorbing’ invisible sound pressure waves. These sound waves are converted via the compression of interlaced quartz crystals into an electrical charge, which is fed into an integral reservoir battery that in turn charges most makes and models of mobile phone. As the ‘device’ is worn, a steady charge is able to be dispensed into the phone via a simple interchangeable lead which fits most handsets.

 
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After a weekend at Glastonbury the Orange Sound Charge will almost certainly be in need of a good scrub, so the Piezoelectric film panel and electronics are all fully removable to enable you to stick it straight in the wash.

The development team behind the device estimate that when used at the festival with sound levels of around 80dB (roughly the same as a busy street), the Orange Sound Charge will generate up to 6 watt hours (W/h) of power over the course of the weekend – enough to charge two standard mobile phones or one Smartphone. Of course festival goers will also be able to plug in their phone for a quick ‘top up’ charge whenever they need it.

 

 
Via Ecouterre - With thanks to Tara McGinley
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Jason Silva’s Turning Into Gods
06.19.2011
08:07 pm

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Dangerous Minds pal and Singularity enthusiast Jason Silva—you might know him from Al Gore’s Current TV—is working on a documentary on the next stage of human evolution, aptly titled Turning Into Gods.  Alongside the concept trailer below, you’ll also find him waxing philosophical on the “Extended Mind Thesis” put forth by cognitive philosophers David Chalmers and Andy Clark, as well as having an “ecstatic dialogue” with Transcendent Man director Barry Ptolemy. 

Jason will be joining Dangerous Minds as a contributor, writing (and ranting) about the intersection of science and art.  Jason recently completed a pilot produced by Bill Maher for HBO. He has written for Vanity Fair, Fast Company, Huffington Post, Big Think, and will have an article in the October issue of Playboy magazine.  Follow Jason on Twitter here: @jason_silva
 

 

 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Fabled Mondo 2000 editor R.U. Sirius returns with Acceler8or
06.14.2011
02:16 pm

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R.U. Sirius, also known as Ken Goffman, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of Mondo 2000 magazine, has a new blog called Acceler8or. The blog will curate links from around the Internet relating to technological acceleration and transhumanist/Singularitarian culture.

The round of content included an interview with Genesis Breyer P. Orridge, and an interesting essay about the new Adam Curtis documentary All Watched Over By Machines of Loving Grace.

In other R.U. Sirius news, Vice Magazine interviewed him over I.M. recently about the history of Mondo 2000 and he gives DM a nice compliment:

Where are all the cyberpunks that read Mondo 2000 back in the day? Was someone like Mark Zuckerberg a reader?
Mark was too young. Maybe Sean Parker. I hear from people in the computer industry all the time that they were inspired by Mondo 2000. Also, people working in biotechnology, nanotechnology… I think the Mondoids are all over the map, most of them still have many of the same enthusiasms, tempered with experience and a healthy skepticism.

You’ve used the term “gonzo anthropology,” the means of studying the more esoteric and under-researched aspects of human culture—what does that mean, exactly?
Alison Kennedy aka Queen Mu, the Mondo 2000 publisher, practices gonzo anthropology. She was the one who uncovered toad venom containing 5-meo DMT in the West. She also explores very odd and arcane anthropological theories about the uses of plants and animals as aphrodisiacs, the use of Calumas as a sort of natural MDMA-like substance. Her magnum opus appeared in Mondo 2000. It was an article about how Jim Morrison used tarantula venom and got penis cancer, based on an entire gonzo anthropological exploration of implications of tarantula venom use (as an inspirational but self-destructive intoxicant) throughout human experience. The Doors producer, whose name I can’t remember, took it very seriously and got very upset about it. Ray Manzarek, I think, was not happy either. It was a wildly brilliant and hilarious and beautifully written piece.

Do you feel that in some ways you guys were too left field for some people?
I think we were too anarchic, playful, and incomprehensible for a mainstream magazine about the uprising of the digital technoculture. One of the first things that I noticed about Wired was that they had letters to the editor from people expressing ordinary Republican or Democratic political views, whereas we would get letters about the green aliens on acid who wrote the letter writer’s new software program and how many different drugs Hitler used. I mean, off the wall stuff. But I think Republicans are on a wall that I can’t relate to. So yeah, there was a limited relationship between us and a mainstream audience. The mainstream media people liked us because we seemed colorful and novel. And as a result of the attention, the people who would read the magazine found out about it. Wired does some great stuff online now, though. It’s an OK institution. I have to say though, they send me the magazine and it usually winds up in recycling, unread.

What do you see as your legacy? Who is continuing what you guys started?
Well, Boing Boing have been their own thing from the start. They were the small magazine when we were the big one, but they’re a relative. Maybe Dangerous Minds, Richard Metzger’s new site, in spirit. But I think Mondo was unique. It was an art project really using journalism and technoculture as a context. It was just a few unusual individuals following instincts. The mistakes were obvious but the energy of it was so much fun that as Richard Kadrey once said, “You have to have a mighty big stick up your ass not to love it.”

Mondo 2000 and gonzo anthropology (Viceland Today)

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Music transcends hate: video master Kutiman does it again with ‘Thru Jerusalem’
06.14.2011
09:52 am

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Art
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Israeli musician, composer, producer and videographer Ophir Kutiel does his art as Kutiman. You may recognize his name from Thru-You, the hypnotically rhythmic collage of non-pro musician YouTube videos from across the globe that he made in 2009, and which scored 10 million views, sent him to the Guggenheim, and made it into Time magazine and landed him at the Guggenheim.

Welp, he’s got a new one, and it’s a burner. With sectarian and ethnic tensions in his Jerusalem birthplace at what seems a permanent high, Kutiman has given the city a similar and very necessary visiosonic treatment with the help of 15 of its Arab and Jewish musicians. Check it.
 

 
After the jump: Kutiman’s mega-video-mashup from late last year Sue You...

Posted by Ron Nachmann | Leave a comment
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