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Video: Trippy anatomical visuals
08.12.2010
12:32 pm

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Art
Music
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Très freaky! Not recommended for the squeamish.
 
(via Street Anatomy)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Space helmets galore
08.11.2010
04:57 pm

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Movies
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Here’s a fun space helmet collage. Now, can you name all the famous faces? 
 
(via Das Kraftfuttermischwerk)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Vagina monologue: Japanese robot mouth vs. virtual baby maker
08.06.2010
11:32 pm

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Amusing
Idiocracy
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Japanese robot mouth provides the narration for a rubber baby maker.

A product of Plasticity
A product of Plasticity
Plastic people, plastic people
You are your foot, your hair
Your nose, your arms
You suck, you love, you are
Your being is you’re plastic
Blah, blah, blah, blah
Plastic peoples - Zappa

 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Is it any wonder people are afraid of technology?
08.04.2010
07:54 pm

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Amusing
Science/Tech
Television

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Technology in your face! BAAAAAM!
 
(via Dooby Brain)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Phonovideo : Turntable Animation For VJs
08.01.2010
11:41 pm

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Animation
Music
Pop Culture
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Using printed cardboard, two turntables, a projector and screen, Austrian student Clemens Kogler created this very groovy concept employing a modern take on the phenakistoscope technique which he calls phonovideo. With one exception, all of the animated paintings are based on album covers. The music for “Stuck in a Groove” was created by Richard Eigner.

The graphic illustrates how the process works. For a more detailed description check out the interview with Kogler at motiongrapher.

Kogler imagines deejays using phonovideo in performance.

Phonovideo is a VJ tool or visual instrument used to display animations in an analog way without the help of a computer. “Stuck in a Groove” is the first film made with this technique, it serves also as a demo for the technique .
In the future phonovideo could be used for live performances in cooperation with musicians, performers and other artists.

 

 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Five year time-lapse of ants living in scanner
07.30.2010
11:23 am

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Environment
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François Vautier says, “I installed an ant colony inside my scanner five years ago. I scanned the nest each week.”
 
Wow! This is pretty amazing stuff!
 
(via Das Kraftfuttermischwerk)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
‘In the late 60s I discovered I could breathe underwater without equipment’
07.29.2010
07:12 pm

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Science/Tech

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“But I might point out that I had one beer before I did that.”

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
21-87: How Arthur Lipsett Influenced George Lucas’s Career
07.23.2010
11:02 pm

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By the time Montreal-born filmmaker Arthur Lipsett made his nine-and-a-half-minute long dystopian short 21-87 in 1963, he was well-aware of the power of abstract collage film. His short from two years earlier, Very Nice, Very Nice was a dizzying flood of black & white images accompanied by bits of audio he’d collected from the trash cans of the National Film Board while he was working there. And wildly enough, it got nominated for a Best Short Subject Oscar in 1962.

But with 21-87, the then-27-year-old Lipsett was not only using moving images, he was also refining his use of sound. And it got the attention of the young USC film student George Lucas, who’d fallen in love with abstract film while going to Canyon Cinema events in the San Francisco Bay area. 21-87’s random and unsettling visions of humans in a mechanistic society accompanied by bits of strangely therapeutic or metaphysical dialogue, freaky old-time music, and weird sound effects, affected Lucas profoundly, according to Steve Silberman in Wired magazine:

’When George saw 21-87, a lightbulb went off,’ says Walter Murch, who created the densely layered soundscapes in [Lucas’s 1967 student short] THX 1138 and collaborated with Lucas on American Graffiti. ‘One of the things we clearly wanted to do in THX-1138 was to make a film where the sound and the pictures were free-floating. Occasionally, they would link up in a literal way, but there would also be long sections where the two of them would wander off, and it would stretch the audience’s mind to try to figure out the connection.’

Famously, Lucas would later use 21-87 as the number Princess Leia’s cell in Star Wars. But although his success allowed him freedom at the NFB, Lipsett’s psychological problems would lead him to commit suicide in 1986, two weeks before he turned 50.
 

 
After the jump, compare with Lucas’s equally bewildering short Electronic Labyrinth: THX-1138 4EB!
 

Posted by Ron Nachmann | Leave a comment
The Beauty Advantage
07.22.2010
02:02 pm

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Science/Tech

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Hypnotic animation—this is an ad, really, but it’s a soft sell—to get people interested to read the Newseek special report on The Beauty Advantage (which is quite interesting). There’s a fairly amusing punchline, but I won’t spoil it for you.

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
“The whole world becomes kaleidoscopic”: Birthday Boy Marshall McLuhan Meets Norman Mailer

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Marshall McLuhan would have turned 99 years old today, and his status as the god-daddy of media studies still seems pretty rock-solid. I wasn’t previously aware of how often the Canadian theorist appeared on TV, and was especially unaware of his November 1967 duet with New York novelist Norman Mailer on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation show The Summer Way, bravely moderated by Ken Lefolii.

Recovered from recent treatment for a benign brain tumor he suffered while teaching in New York, McLuhan gamely tugs at a few of Mailer’s pretensions. Mailer is recently back from levitating the Pentagon with the Yippies, with the siege of Chicago during the 1968 Democratic Convention in his future.

McLuhan pops off a bunch of gems, including:

The planet is no longer nature, it’s now the content of an artwork.

Nature has ceased to exist…it needs to be programmed.

The environment is not visible, it’s information—it’s electronic.

The present is only faced by any generation by the artist.

Communications maven Michael Hinton goes speculative on his hero’s televised meeting with the Jersey-raised boxer-novelist, but of course it’s best to just check the thing out yourself.
 

 
More after the jump…
 

Posted by Ron Nachmann | Leave a comment
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