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8mm Vintage Camera iPhone app
12.29.2010
04:57 pm

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As someone who shot a lot of Super 8 film back in the day, I must say, I was quite impressed by the new 8mm Vintage Camera app for the iPhone and iPod touch.

It used to be that the “vintage” effects packages for treating digital video were lacking whatever that ineffable quality is that can make something digital look like an authentically retro celluloid format. Just adding a bit of screen jitter here and there with some “scratches” didn’t cut it. I was never able to get the effect I was looking for, but, wow, this app is done right.

The app comes with 25 different retro looks, five different kinds of “film,” five “lenses,” retro filmstock color palettes, light leaks, random flickering and jitters. And best of all, the effects are seen “live” in the viewfinder. With the “old skool” celluloid version you never knew what was going to come back (admittedly part of the fun) but now that variable has been removed.

From Nexvio, it’s priced at just $1.99. The only bummer is that it doesn’t output HD video. How much longer will it be before an effects package like this becomes standard issue with video cameras?
 

 
Via Retro to Go

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Scientist solves the math of cities
12.21.2010
02:47 pm

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Science/Tech
Thinkers

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A must-read article from The New York Times about brilliant, 70-year-old physicist Geoffrey West, who has found a way to crack the code of what happens when population density occurs. West, has, in essence, turned the concept of a “city” into an elegant mathematical formula:

After two years of analysis, West and Bettencourt discovered that all of these urban variables could be described by a few exquisitely simple equations. For example, if they know the population of a metropolitan area in a given country, they can estimate, with approximately 85 percent accuracy, its average income and the dimensions of its sewer system. These are the laws, they say, that automatically emerge whenever people “agglomerate,” cramming themselves into apartment buildings and subway cars. It doesn’t matter if the place is Manhattan or Manhattan, Kan.: the urban patterns remain the same. West isn’t shy about describing the magnitude of this accomplishment. “What we found are the constants that describe every city,” he says. “I can take these laws and make precise predictions about the number of violent crimes and the surface area of roads in a city in Japan with 200,000 people. I don’t know anything about this city or even where it is or its history, but I can tell you all about it. And the reason I can do that is because every city is really the same.” After a pause, as if reflecting on his hyperbole, West adds: “Look, we all know that every city is unique. That’s all we talk about when we talk about cities, those things that make New York different from L.A., or Tokyo different from Albuquerque. But focusing on those differences misses the point. Sure, there are differences, but different from what? We’ve found the what.”

A Physicist Solves the City (New York Times)

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Digital Tattoo: next-level audio/visual art from Berlin
12.18.2010
02:06 pm

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Animation
Art
Music
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Berlin has always been a bastion of innovative cultural work, and one excellent example of this is the Digital Tattoo Productions outfit.

Comprised of the husband/wife team of video artist and animator Edna Orozco and sound artist Dean “Tricky D” Bagar, Digital Tattoo have executed video-mapping-and-sound projects on historical sites in both their home countries of Colombia and Croatia.

They also recently worked on the body-centered dance theatre piece Quia, performed in Bogota and excerpted below. Check it out and keep an eye and ear out for these folks…
 

Digital Tattoo- QUIA from digital tattoo on Vimeo.

 

Posted by Ron Nachmann | Leave a comment
The new Word Lens iphone app is truly impressive
12.17.2010
12:48 pm

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I’m not someone who is over-impressed by gadgets and technology. I realize it’s almost heresy to admit this in today’s world, but even though I own a cell phone, I never, ever carry it. I just don’t like to be bothered. BUT, that is not to say I wasn’t kinda bowled over by the new iPhone app called “Word Lens” which was released yesterday from Quest Visual.

You simply point your iPhone’s video camera at text and it will do a real-time Spanish to English translation (or vice versa). Other languages to follow. As one of the reviewers points out, “It’s like a visual version of Douglas Adam’s Babblefish.”

That it is! Once they load up on some more languages, this puppy would really come in handy hitchhiking around the galaxy, eh?
 

 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
I’ve just been eaten by a giant Peyote button
12.15.2010
05:37 pm

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Art
Music
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R.M. ceated this beautiful journey into a mandelbox.

This is my second 3d fractal animation made with Mandelbulb 3d. The formula is a simple rotated mandelbox. Audio from my drone/ambient/experimental side project called ‘Musicians With Guns’.

I feel like I’m being devoured by a giant Peyote button while tripping on DMT.
 

 
Via FF

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Massive solar explosion gif’d
12.15.2010
01:15 pm

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Environment
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Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
When Facebook becomes a book
12.08.2010
03:59 pm

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Media
Pop Culture
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Siavosh Zabeti, and Alexander Kalchev create a FaceBOOK, a social network in hard copy form. De-evolution.

Bouygues Telecom asked us to come up with an idea to launch their facebook platform. They wanted us to create something that would go beyond using your profile picture in a funny way, or pranking your friends with a small joke.

We decided to look at the way we use facebook and found that even though we use the social networking site everyday, we forget our favorite moments we share online. So we created an app that could change that, and keep your facebook, in a book.

 

Via Abduzeedo

 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
MIT designs intelligent wallets that help you control your spending
12.07.2010
07:11 pm

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Science/Tech

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This wallet has a hinge that automatically locks when you’ve exceeded your monthly spending limit.
 
Designers at MIT Media Lab have created Proverbial Wallets that vibrate, swell, shrink or lock in accordance with the amount of money or credit you have and/or monthly budget goals.

Financial sixth sense.

We have trouble controlling our consumer impulses, and there’s a gap between our decision and the consequences. This is magnified by the digitization of money. When we pull a product off the shelf, do we know what our bank account balance is, or whether we’re over budget for the month? Our existing senses are inadequate to warn us.
The Proverbial Wallet gives us that financial sense at the point of purchase by un-abstracting virtual assets. Tactile feedback reflecting our personal balances and transactions helps us develop a subconscious financial sense that guides responsible decisions. In addition to providing a visceral connection to our virtual money, tactile output keeps personal information private and ambient.

 

Via TWBE

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
What happens when you inhale Sulfur Hexafluoride?
12.07.2010
02:12 pm

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Amusing
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Lance Lund, a professor at Anoka-Ramsey Community College, is gonna show you how to royally fuck up with Sulfur Hexafluoride. Blue Velvet’s Frank Booth has nothin’ on Professor Lance Lund. Nothin’. 

Oh, and if you’re curious, there’s a splendid remix here.

(via HYST)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Extremely deep zoom into the Mandelbrot set: Infinitely psychedelic
12.07.2010
02:07 am

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Animation
Art
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The beautiful and infinite geometry of our Universe is echoed in this vivid fractal journey generated by Chris Korda using the Mandelbrot set. Worlds within worlds within whorls.

Korda describes the making of the video:

This is an extremely deep dive into the Mandelbrot set, to 2^316 (binary). In decimal that’s 1E+95, or 1 with 95 zeros after it.
The video was rendered using my own fractal software, called Fractice, which supports distributed processing using a client/server architecture. The render took five months, using a cluster of up to 20 dual-core PCs on a LAN, all running the Fractice rendering server. The actual number of servers varied over the five-month period but averaged around 15. Rendering only occurred at night.

 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
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