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The other Monkees react to the death of Davy Jones


 
Gathering up the reactions of remaining Monkees Mike Nesmith, Micky Dolenz and Peter to the passing of Davy Jones

Mike Nesmith:

All the lovely people. Where do they all come from?

So many lovely and heartfelt messages of condolence and sympathy, I don’t know what to say, except my sincere thank you to all. I share and appreciate your feelings.

But let’s not get ahead of ourselves here.

While it is jarring, and sometimes seems unjust, or strange, this transition we call dying and death is a constant in the mortal experience that we know almost nothing about. I am of the mind that it is a transition and I carry with me a certainty of the continuity of existence. While I don’t exactly know what happens in these times, there is an ongoing sense of life that reaches in my mind out far beyond the near horizons of mortality and into the reaches of infinity.

That David has stepped beyond my view causes me the sadness that it does many of you. I will miss him, but I won’t abandon him to mortality. I will think of him as existing within the animating life that insures existence. I will think of him and his family with that gentle regard in spite of all the contrary appearances on the mortal plane.

David’s spirit and soul live well in my heart, among all the lovely people, who remember with me the good times, and the healing times, that were created for so many, including us.

I have fond memories. I wish him safe travels.

Peter Tork posted the following on his Facebook fan page:

”It is with great sadness that I reflect on the sudden passing of my long-time friend and fellow-adventurer, David Jones. His talent will be much missed; his gifts will be with us always. My deepest sympathy to Jessica and the rest of his family. Adios, to the Manchester Cowboy.

Peace and love, Peter T.”

Micky Dolenz released a statement:

“I am in a state of shock; Davy and I grew up together and shared in the unique success of what became The Monkees phenomena. The time we worked together and had together is something I’ll never forget. He was the brother I never had and this leaves a gigantic hole in my heart. The memories have and will last a lifetime. My condolences go out to his family.”

Below a forever young Davy Jones makes a prom date with Marcia Brady.
 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Discussion
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Eric Burdon & War: ‘Paint It Black’
02.28.2012
04:29 pm

Topics:
Music
Television

Tags:
Germany
1970s
Eric Burdon
War

eric_burdon_war
 
Eric Burdon and War perform a blistering version of The Stones’ “Paint It Black” on German television 1970. More cowbell, Eric.
 

 
With thanks to Takeshi Hattori
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
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UK’s Channel 5 screws up over Whitney’s death


 
Of all the national TV broadcasters in the UK, Channel 5 has the worst reputation. Its content is sensationalist and downmarket (it’s where the declining Big Brother show has gone to die) but this advert-scheduling screw-up really takes the biscuit. The fact they had a documentary on Whitney’s life and death barely a week after her passing says a lot, but what’s even worse is that nobody at the station seemed to think the two adverts featured here might clash just a tiny wee bit
 

 
Thanks to Rod Connolly!

Posted by Niall O'Conghaile | Discussion
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‘Here’s the story of a lovely lady…’
02.27.2012
03:00 pm

Topics:
Queer
Television

Tags:
Robert Reed


 
Being typecast as the ultra-bland all-American father figure “Mike Brady” must’ve been painful for an actor with Robert Reed’s talents.

Dr. Milo writes on YouTube:

Robert Reed went to elaborate lengths to distance himself from the character of Mike Brady after the “The Brady Bunch” ended in 1974. Here he is seen as Dr. Pat Caddison, after his sex change operation in the second part of “The Fourth Sex” episode of “Medical Center” from September 15, 1975. The big reveal occurs at about the 3:15 mark. The same year Reed would play an IRS agent who makes obscene phone calls in “The Secret Night Caller” TV movie.

Despite the fact that there is an undeniably fun element to seeing “Mike Brady” wearing a dress, this is a pretty moving scene and very well-acted.
 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Discussion
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Characters from ‘The Wire’ made into little wind-up toys
02.27.2012
11:29 am

Topics:
Amusing
Design
Television

Tags:
The Wire
Wind-up toys


From Left to right: Jimmy McNulty, Bunk Moreland, Bubbles, Omar Little, and Kima Greggs.
 
These wind-up toys of the cast from The Wire made me happier than a pig in shit! Especially the “Omar Little”! Mister Frothee designed these lil’ guys and writes on his Flickr page, “They’re each about 2.5 inches tall, and have weird proportions due to the small motors they contain.”
 

“Omar Little”

Previously on Dangerous Minds:
Only fans of ‘The Wire’ will get this

Via Super Punch

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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‘Graffiti Rock’: The coolest 25 minutes in the history of hip-hop TV
02.25.2012
01:37 am

Topics:
Hip-hop
Music
Pop Culture
Television

Tags:
Graffiti Rock


 
For your weekend viewing pleasure we present Graffiti Rock, a TV pilot for New York’s WPIX channel that aired once in 1984.

Featuring The “most host” Michael Holman, Run D.M.C., Shannon, The New York City Breakers, DJ Jimmie Jazz, Kool Moe Dee, Special K of the Treacherous Three and The New York City Breakers, among others, Graffiti Rock is a sweet piece of hip-hop history. The show was way too cool for TV. But perfect for the Internet. Dig it.

On the fashion tip, it’s all here:  Kangols, shelltoe Addidas, name plate chains and belt buckles, Cazals, windbreakers, air-brushed T’s and fedoras.

25 minutes of bliss.
 

 
Previously on Dangerous Minds:  Graffiti Rock: Hip-hop storms America’s living rooms in 1984.

 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Discussion
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Randy California and Ed Cassidy perform ‘I Got A Line On You’ on late night TV 1992
02.23.2012
10:06 pm

Topics:
History
Music
Television

Tags:
Spirit
Randy California


 
Better late than never. A belated happy birthday (February 20) to Randy California. You are missed brother.

A solid performance of “I Got A line On You” by Randy and his stepdad Ed Cassidy from a 1992 episode of Dennis “the cretin” Miller’s short-lived TV show.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Discussion
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A Glossary of Television Terms, from 1964

Glossary_of_Television_Terms
 
This is rather delightful: “A Glossary of Television Terms” illustrated by John Alcorn, under the art direction of Lou Dorfsman, as an advertisement for CBS Television, published in the New York Times February 10th 1964. The ad amusingly explains such terms as:

Juic’er. Any television electrician who is especially trained and equipped to work with heavy power lines.

And,

Lock’jaw. (a) A performer who delivers lines without expression (b) A vocalist who lacks inspiration.

As well as,

Drop. Scenery which is suspended from metal frame-work or grid near the studio roof and is not framed.

Originally posted by somuchpileup and a larger version can be found here on thecuriousbrain.
 
With thanks to Maria Salavessa Hormigo Guimil
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
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Cassetteboy vs. The News
02.22.2012
01:12 pm

Topics:
Amusing
Television

Tags:
Cassetteboy
BBC News

cassetteboy_vs_the_news
 
Cassetteboy “are a double act who edit footage they’ve nicked off the telly”. Famed for their cleverly edited piss-takes of such odious people as the BNP’s Nick Griffin, and spoofs of The Apprentice, and for making Gordon Brown swear. Now, Cassetteboy take on the BBC News with childish glee, in this short clip made form 15 editions of the Beeb’s flagship 6 O’Clock News from January 2012.
 

 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
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Sex & Violence: the first ever ‘Muppet Show,’ 1974


 
An interesting curio from the back catalog of the Jim Henson estate here - the first ever (pilot) episode of The Muppet Show, which was recorded late in 1974 for broadcast in 1975. From the Muppets wikia:

The Muppet Show: Sex and Violence aired on ABC on March 19, 1975, and was shot on December 10-16, 1974.

It was one of the two pilots produced for The Muppet Show. The other pilot, The Muppets Valentine Show, aired in 1974.

In this half-hour variety special, the Muppets parody the proliferation of sex and violence on television.

Subtitled “An End to Sex & Violence,” this first ever episode of the world’s favourite puppet theatre seems a bit racy for a supposed family audience. However, watching this pilot it’s clear that Henson and co. were aiming for a more adult-orientated, risqué edge to the material, akin to the sketches they provided in the very early years of Saturday Night Live (and which were deemed, in the end, not to work.)

Obviously some more fine tuning was needed on this material before it became the international hit we all know and love. Not least a honing of the format and pacing of the show. This early version is a lot more fast-moving, with quicker cuts between multiple sketches, which we return to numerous times. The show had also yet to make musical numbers its main focus, perhaps explaining the later decision to constrain the sketches to single slots allowed to play out in full.

That’s not the only thing that’s disconcertingly different though: the usual Muppet Show host Kermit is relegated to just a bit part, even though by this stage he had become well known through appearances on Sesame Street. Sam the Eagle has a lot of screen time, and an early variant on Miss Piggy makes a brief appearance.

The main presenting duties go to a humanoid Muppet called Nigel, who is backed up by right hand man by Floyd Pepper, better known as the bass player in Dr Teeth’s Electric Mayhem and the popular character Janice’s main squeeze. The main Muppets’ to-camera addresses are a lot more knowing and audience-literate than Kermit’s let’s-get-this-show-on-the-road style, again hinting at the influence of a more grown-up, hip comedy aesthetic influenced by Lorne Michaels and even Monty Python.

Still, flawed as it may be, this is well worth a watch for Muppet fans and even the more curious viewer. Below is part one, while parts two and three are after the jump:
 

 
The Muppet Show: Sex & Violence Parts 2 & 3 after the jump…

Posted by Niall O'Conghaile | Discussion
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