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Photographer removes smartphones from images to show how obsessed we are with them
10.12.2015
11:47 am

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Art

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smartphones
Photographer removes smartphones from images to show how obsessed we are with them


 
Now this isn’t one of those “Get off my lawn! I hate technology!” posts. I love my iPhone, I really do. This post is just simply visually showing the obsessive preoccupation we all have with our mobile devices. Technology is great, but I believe it’s even better when used in moderation.

Photographer Eric Pickersgill series of photographs titled “Removed” was inspired by an experience he once has in a restaurant:

Family sitting next to me at Ilium café in Troy, NY is so disconnected from one another. Not much talking. Father and two daughters have their own phones out. Mom doesn’t have one or chooses to leave it put away. She stares out the window, sad and alone in the company of her closest family. Dad looks up every so often to announce some obscure piece of info he found online. Twice he goes on about a large fish that was caught. No one replies. I am saddened by the use of technology for interaction in exchange for not interacting. This has never happened before and I doubt we have scratched the surface of the social impact of this new experience. Mom has her phone out now.

~snip

The joining of people to devices has been rapid and unalterable. The application of the personal device in daily life has made tasks take less time. Far away places and people feel closer than ever before. Despite the obvious benefits that these advances in technology have contributed to society, the social and physical implications are slowly revealing themselves. In similar ways that photography transformed the lived experience into the photographable, performable, and reproducible experience, personal devices are shifting behaviors while simultaneously blending into the landscape by taking form as being one with the body. This phantom limb is used as a way of signaling busyness and unapproachability to strangers while existing as an addictive force that promotes the splitting of attention between those who are physically with you and those who are not.



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
via CE

Posted by Tara McGinley

 

 

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