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Boys and girls come out to play: The strange, surreal, and phantasmagorical world of Jaco Putker
09.08.2017
09:08 am
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Boys and girls come out to play: The strange, surreal, and phantasmagorical world of Jaco Putker Boys and girls come out to play: The strange, surreal, and phantasmagorical world of Jaco Putker

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‘The Boy and The Hat.’
 
For Jaco Putker, the great thing about being an artist is waking up each morning and not knowing what he’s going do that day. It’s this great sense of freedom that really matters rather than being known by the appellation “artist.” Putker has said he doesn’t know what it means to be an artist. Mostly, he feels like “a regular guy who loves to create.”

Jaco Putker is an artist and printmaker from the Hague, Netherlands. He uses digital and traditional methods of printmaking to create his pictures but prefers to work with photopolymer, or solar plate, etching. This allows him to produce highly photo-realistic depictions as can be seen by the selection of etchings shown here. Putker’s artwork is described as strange, surreal, and phantasmagorical, sometimes amusing, often sinister. He offers no interpretation of what his pictures might mean—even the titles offer no clue but are merely simple descriptive statements like The Girl and The Berries or The Boy and The Masks. His intention is for the viewer to bring their own interpretation to each picture—thinking of each image as say, an illustration to a series of imaginary fables which are only given meaning in the viewer’s mind.

Putker has won several awards for his highly distinctive artworks which have been exhibited across the world from Tokyo to Chicago, China to Britain. He claims he has no one influence on his work but cites an abiding interest in “Nature and in how nature works, in its perfection and self-reliance and its power of rejuvenation and destruction. In how it has a profound effect on not just me, but on virtually every human being.”

I’m interested in the Hermetic Principles of Correspondence (formulated in the axiom ‘As Above, So Below’; the correlation between macro and micro cosmos) and of Vibration (which states that all is in constant motion. Both in a visually perceivable manner as on a (sub)atomic level. Every part of nature is connected to any other part of nature. These seem to be the parameters within which my work takes place. But within these parameters,  I try not to think too much about my work. Defining it sort of kills it for me. In hindsight, I see a development and recurring themes and elements. And it strikes me that I seem to be saying the same thing over and over, regardless of style, medium or technique.

A selection of Jaco Putker’s prints are available to buy here and more of his work can be found here.
 
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‘The Girl and The Berries.’
 
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‘Interior No.48 .’
 
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‘The Girl and The Mushrooms.’
 
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‘Estate No. 2.’
 
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‘Interior No. 31.’
 
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‘The Grounds No. 4 .’
 
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‘The Girls and The Diver.’
 
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‘The Man and The Ice.’
 
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‘The Girl from The Woods.’
 
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‘Interior No. 44.’
 
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‘The Girl and The Ladybird.’
 
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‘The Boy and The Masks.’
 
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‘The Girl and The Chameleon.’
 
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‘Interior No. 22.’
 

Previously on Dangerous Minds:
In Dreams: Grete Stern’s powerful feminist surrealism
The eye-popping, beautifully surreal collages of Eugenia Loli
The Surreal world of Coco Fronsac

Posted by Paul Gallagher
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09.08.2017
09:08 am
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