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Tim Buckley and Jean Renoir meet Beau Bridges in 1971’s ‘The Christian Licorice Store’


 
After The Monkees TV series ended, 33-year-old director James Frawley went to work on his very first motion picture. The Criterion-worthy Christian Licorice Store stars Beau Bridges as floppy hair, bushy-browed, tennis superstar Franklin Cane and follows the ups and downs of his turbulent Hollywood lifestyle. Inspired by the great French New Wave and Italian neorealists of the late 1950s and 1960s, the film sadly never reached an audience and was shelved by Cinema Center Films just after a few screenings in Boston and Greenwich Village in 1971.

Director James Frawley spoke with me over the phone from his retirement home just outside Palm Springs this week and we discussed the rarely seen film that is still near and dear to his heart. “I came to L.A. first as an actor in an improvisational group called The Premise which was Buck Henry, Ted Flicker, George Segal, and Joan Darling. So the introduction to directing was very improvisational one in which we had a great camera, great writers, terrific young guys, and I had two years of apprenticeship directing with The Monkees. So when I went to make The Christian Licorice Store we took a very improvisational approach to it.”

The story follows Beau Bridges success in the professional tennis world: competing for prize money, entertaining the press, and fielding endorsement offers by day. By night he attends superficial Hollywood parties where he meets love interest, photographer and socialite Cynthia Viestrom (played by Swedish actress and future James Bond girl Maud Adams). For the party scenes, Frawley called on favors from several friends to come in and play themselves as party goers. “The party is full of show business celebrities, producers, writers, psychiatrists, and different characters from Los Angeles and Beverly Hills. I pretty much just improvised the scene and then put it together in the editing room. But it really catches the flavor, I think very much of L.A. Everybody kind of agreed to do it, I looked at the list last night and it’s amazing, I mean Mike Medavoy for chrissakes, Howard Hesseman who’s a friend of mine that was in the second party, George Kirgo, Robert Kaufman, a lot of really amazing people. And it was fun, we did it in one night.” Director Monte Hellman of Two-Lane Blacktop and future Barney Miller creator Ted Flicker also make an appearance.

The Christian Licorice Store makes fun of the superficial showbiz side of Hollywood, while also painting a beautiful portrait of the city using incredible locations from William Pereira‘s LACMA and Theme Building, Johnie’s Coffee Shop, and up the Pacific Coast Highway to the scenic views of Soledad Canyon and Morro Rock. To add to the realism, Frawley used urban, guerrilla filmmaking to capture real L.A. pedestrians walking down the street, driving around, and going about their everyday business. “You put a camera out on a street and just shoot some stuff and just intercut it with the scenes just to get the flavor of L.A.” Then there are nighttime scenes in the film that perfectly capture the strange emptiness of the city after dark. “I love their kind of romantic ballet in the cars coming down the hill from the party. It was kind of a very romantic feeling I had about Los Angeles and, being a New Yorker, you know, the light, the romance, the sexuality. I love the architecture, I mean La La Land, the recent movie, is very much like that in terms of its appreciation of L.A.”
 

 
Frawley tells screenwriter Floyd Mutrix’s story using a very unconventional, avant-garde approach. “I’m a film buff and I grew up with European movies. I loved Godard, 400 Blows, Breathless, Fellini, all of the Italian realists. That was my education and my influence because it does have a very European feeling to it.” The director and screenwriter make many bold decisions, such as opening the film with the dramatic ending scene of the film, a gull-winged Mercedes-Benz wiping out in a tunnel alongside the PCH. Frawley accomplished this with a delicate style of filmmaking that does not spoil the entire movie. “I wanted to frame the film in a way so that you had a sense of foreboding that kind of holds over this whole movie. There’s kind of a sadness to the picture too, a sense of things are not going to turn out well here.” In yet another bold move, the opening credits don’t appear until nearly twelve minutes into the picture and are contained in the movie-within-the-movie when the party-goers are summoned to the screening room of the swanky, modern house.

It certainly helps to make a European influenced film in Hollywood when you have the approval and participation of one of the greatest filmmakers of all time. Executive producer Michael Laughlin was then married to the French movie star Leslie Caron, who knew Jean Renoir‘s family in France. They asked him if he would agree to make a cameo appearance in The Christian Licorice Store and surprisingly, he said yes… it would end up being the final feature film Renoir was ever involved in before his passing.

“There’s a lot of things I love about the movie, and there are some things that feel awkward because it’s a first film, but the presence of Jean Renoir in the movie is unbelievable. If the movie existed only for Jean Renoir it would be enough for me. A lot of this movie was about people saying yes when we asked them, ‘Would you do this?’ Because a lot of it was favors, and Jean Renoir was a favor, and he’s like Picasso, one of the great men of all time and a great filmmaker. And so we were allowed to be in his house for an afternoon, and again this is totally improvised. As we drove up the hill to his house and drove down afterward, you see those shots, and he talked about film, and he talked about Beau and Maud, and what he did so brilliantly, he talked about how attractive they were to one another in real life. He said, ‘You two could be lovers in real life’ which was wonderful because he acknowledged the fact that we were making a movie.”
 

 
Also making a very notable cameo in the film is prolific singer-songwriter Tim Buckley, who is seen photographed in a studio by Maud Adams while performing the song “Pleasant Street” from the album Goodbye and Hello. Screenwriter Floyd Mutrix took part of Buckley’s lyrics from the song to arrive at the title The Christian Licorice Store. “Intentionally obscure, I’m afraid” Frawley commented. “I hated the title but Mr. Mutrix won out.” Another noteworthy legend appearing is 64-year-old Gilbert Roland as Bridges coach and mentor Jonathan “J.C.” Carruthers. “Gilbert Roland was a movie actor in the ‘20s, ‘30s, and ‘40s, he was kind of a pretty well-known star. And I love his reminiscence at the museum when he talks about how Los Angeles used to be so much more romantic and so much more authentic than it is now.” Roland is perfectly cast as a former tennis star and serves as Bridges connection to the truth in life: discouraging him from taking up acting roles or endorsements for hair spray brands because those things will take time away from what his real talents in life have to offer.
 

 
Complete with a wonderful score by composer Lalo Schifrin, The Christian Licorice is rarely screened and has still never been officially released on VHS or DVD in any country. It remains a gem waiting to be dug up and rediscovered by future film lovers. James Frawley, now 80 years old and retired from the entertainment business enjoyed a long and satisfying career which included the critically acclaimed original Muppet Movie in 1979. He still makes efforts, when he can, to spread the word and to talk about the picture. “It was my first film and so I feel a certain affection for it. It didn’t get much of a screening though I must admit, there wasn’t an audience for it. But the people who have seen it really remembered and liked it. I screened the film here in the desert, at the Palm Springs Film Society about a year ago and it was great to see it in front of an audience, and it was gratifying to see how the response was so positive. People thought the film was very contemporary and could exist very much in this time frame. I think it’s a very meaningful film and one that captures a certain time in Los Angeles and talks about success and fame and love.”

For serious film lovers, an archival transfer of The Christian Licorice Store is available from the fine folks over at Modcinema. Game, Set, Match!

Very special thanks to Mr. James Frawley
 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Doug Jones
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02.16.2017
09:50 am
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