David Tibet of Current 93 and Killing Joke’s Youth debut their new duo, Hypnopazūzu
07.22.2016
09:56 am

Topics:
Music
Occult

Tags:


 
This is a welcome development: Hypnopazūzu, a duo comprising Current 93’s David Tibet and Killing Joke bassist Youth, will be releasing an album and playing a show in London this year. (Youth’s other duo is the Fireman, with Paul McCartney of Wings-fame.) The date of the show has not been announced, but the record, Create Christ, Sailor Boy, is coming out on the House of Mythology label in August; it will be a three-sided LP (with side four devoted to “a laser etching of a Youth/David Tibet Hallucinatory Cartoon”) and a single CD.

It figures these guys are old pals. Youth, along with Annie Anxiety and Steven Stapleton of Nurse with Wound, joined Tibet on Current 93’s first album, 1984’s Nature Unveiled. As for Pazuzu, whose name I will forever hear as intoned by Richard Burton in Exorcist II, he is among the evil deities William S. Burroughs invokes at the beginning of Cities of the Red Night:

Pazuzu, Lord of Fevers and Plagues, Dark Angel of the Four Winds with rotting genitals from which he howls through sharpened teeth over stricken cities…

 

 
Pazuzu is also the subject of a number of Tibet’s recent paintings. Tibet explained (sort of) his interest in the Mesopotamian demon king in a very condensed memoir published by Dazed three years ago:

I started painting Hallucinatory Prayers, which consisted of biblical verses written thousands of times in white ink on black paper. Revisiting my pubescence, I did an MA in Coptic and started translating mainly Sahidic texts. Then I began to learn Akkadian after dreaming of metal doors covered with cuneiform, which meant I had also to paint Pazuzu. Anaku pazuzu, as the Akkadians wrote.

While you search for your copy of Huehnergard’s Akkadian grammar, hallucinate with “Magog At The MayPole,” from Create Christ, Sailor Boy.
 

Posted by Oliver Hall | Leave a comment
Body Horror: David Cronenberg’s mad doctors… dissected
07.22.2016
09:56 am

Topics:
Movies

Tags:


Oliver Reed as Dr. Hal Raglan in The Brood (1979)
 
David Cronenberg really directed some doozies between about 1975 and 1990…. actually he never stopped making remarkable movies, but that first big chunk of material represents most of what we think about when we throw out the word “Cronenbergian.” The prosaic yet unsettling visions he presented in Shivers, Rabid, The Brood, Scanners, Videodrome, The Dead Zone, The Fly, and Dead Ringers are the most thorough expression of the “body horror” genre and have no true equal in the canon of world cinema.

Until I watched L. C. Durham’s intriguing, er, dissection of Cronenberg’s repeated inclusion of unreliable medicos in this period, it had never occurred to me that the pattern was that strong. Get a load of this murderer’s row of medical professionals: Dr. Antoine Rouge, Dr. Emil Hobbes, Dr. Dan Keloid, Dr. Hal Raglan, Dr. Paul Ruth, Dr. Sam Weizak, Drs. Beverly and Elliot Mantle. It’s a lovely bunch, no? We can only wonder why Cronenberg had quite so much to say about doctors.

Keep reading after the jump…

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Awesome cassette tape coffee tables that you can buy right now
07.22.2016
09:37 am

Topics:
Design
Music

Tags:


 
A company called Altar Furniture has a spiffy line of coffee tables that resemble audio cassettes from the 1960s through the 1990s. As you can see above, conversion kits are available if you would prefer to use the same basic cassette component for a dining table or a desk.

The cassette tables are available to buy, but they aren’t cheap. All the models go for the same price of 1,925 Euros (about $2,120).

One of the designs pays homage to “the first compact music cassette ever manufactured,” a Philips product released in 1964. Many of the available models emulate actual demo cassettes used in the early days of bands like Metallica, Nirvana, and Pearl Jam. Other touchstones include Día de Muertos, Cypress Hill, the Dead Kennedys, and the Sugar Hill Gang.

The best thing, though? Let’s go to the Altar website:
 

Each table contains 120 meters of satin, to give you a real tape feeling, and yes, the wheels turn in the table. Make sure not to unwind all of it, it is a nightmare to put back.


 
Now that’s the picture I want to see, how one of these tables looks after your bratty 7-year-old nephew gets through with it…....
 

“1964”
 

“Blue”
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Dreamy sci-fi paintings show the world after an alien invasion
07.22.2016
09:30 am

Topics:
Art

Tags:


 
While science fiction is a rich genre for both film and literature, the visual art it inspires—most frequently relegated to the covers of bad paperbacks—is very often astoundingly corny, regardless of how good the book it’s interpreting might actually be. Really good sci-fi art is really hard to come by, another reason why Simon Stålenhag is so singular; his post-invasion landscapes are dreamy, intense, and mysterious—completely devoid of the heavy-handed cheese one normally associates with paintings of robots and/or aliens taking over the earth.

Stålenhag has complied his work into two high-concept art books, Tales from the Loop and the sequel Things from the Flood, which comes out in November but is available for pre-order now. Ground Zero for Stålenhag’s dystopia is an alternative Sweden from his own ’80s and ’90s childhood, where experiments with a massive particle accelerator—“The Loop”—go terribly wrong. Despite the disaster, Stålenhag likes to focus on the quiet and the mundane countryside, now irrevocably altered by mysterious invaders. Still, there is an intimacy to his work, with special attention to the domestic lives, childhoods and romances of the people living in this chaotic new world.
 

 

 
Much more of Simon Stålenhag’s work after the jump…

Posted by Amber Frost | Leave a comment