Just some Victorian women and their big-ass dresses
06.27.2017
12:04 pm
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When I saw these photographs of Victorian women in their voluminous skirts and dresses, I wondered what I could say that hasn’t already been said by the usual suspects in historical books or feminists texts about patriarchy and fashion, etcetera, etcetera. I really don’t want to go down that path, but if you do there are plenty of sites out there that will supply the goods.

Honestly, my first thought when I saw these pictures was: “How the hell did these women go about their daily lives dressed like this?” It couldn’t have been easy. It couldn’t have been very practical or even remotely comfortable. But then, most fashion isn’t meant to comfortable—it’s about performance, it’s about dressing up to present a show. Victorian fashion was all about presentation—like the whalebone corsets worn to keep the female figure constrained, narrow-waisted, and artificially slim. Seems perverse to us today, but so might breast implants appear one day to our progeny’s progeny.

Fashion changed rapidly during the 19th-century with radical developments in industrialization, mass production, new techniques in printing patterns and colors, and the rise of the department store. At the start of the century, dresses were straight up-and-down maxi-lengthened Jane Austen-type garments made of linen and silk. By the 1820s, there was a flaring out of the hem and a widening of the hips to give women a more voluptuous and feminine shape.

This style of dress developed quite dramatically in the 1830s when such dresses ballooned out from the waist like a bell or a parachute, while the upper half of the body remained slim and pinched at the waist. Their bell-like shape was solely dependent on the hidden supporting structure of a bustle or crinoline cage suspended from the wearer’s waist. These “cages” were originally made of whalebone but were soon superseded by lighter more sturdy yet flexible “steel-hooped cage crinoline” in 1856.

Such hoop dresses or skirts were worn by all class of women. But it should be noted, these garments were often very hazardous as many working-class women lost their lives after their skirts were caught in machinery while many middle-class women perished after their dresses caught fire.

Rich women would have had a whole closet filled with various beautifully designed outfits. Lower class women usually had just the one outfit, which they kept fashionable by changing collars and cuffs or adding ribbons or a new layer of material.

Ultimately, the whole ensemble presented the image each of these women either wanted to or felt obliged to present.
 
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More Victorian women in big-ass skirts, after the jump…

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Posted by Paul Gallagher
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06.27.2017
12:04 pm
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Phone scammers called *this one programmer* and immediately regretted it!
06.27.2017
11:51 am
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Face it, we live in an era defined by “fake news,” identity theft, and countless nefarious schemes to separate you from your money through false pretenses, especially using social media. Just a few months ago, the feds indicted dozens of scammers working out of India, an operation that targeted 56 individuals and 5 companies, for frauds perpetrated against over 10,000 people that cheated them out of literally hundreds of millions of dollars.

The good news is that the feds occasionally get help from unexpected sources, such as Project Mayhem, which is described as the work of “a security developer who tries to prevent victims from being scammed by different types of scams.”

A group of phone scammers had the misfortune to approach this particular security developer, who goes by the username “YesItWasDataMined,” a move that it quickly came to regret. In this case the scammers were pretending to work for the IRS calling about a “miscalculation error” in past taxes with some scarifying language about attempting to defraud the government—the hackers then proceeded to attempt to secure the “total outstanding amount,” which was purportedly $8,219.

Project Mayhem instantly recognized the scam for what it was, and decided to take action. He wrote a script that dialed each of their phones 28 times per second with an automated message, tying up their lines and making it impossible to reach other potential victims. Crucially, he recorded many of the scammers as they contended with the same impersonal recording endlessly stating the following:
 

Hello! It has been detected that you are a scammer. Because of this, we are now flooding your phone lines to prevent you from scamming additional people. This will not stop until you stop.

 
The method worked wonders, as we can hear the increasingly frustrated responses of the scammers, which range from sarcasm (“Hi, it has been detected that you are trying to fuck me up”) to prideful rage (“YES I KNOW I AM A SCAMMER, AND I’M PROUD TO BE A SCAMMER MOTHERFUCKER!”)

More, after the jump…

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Posted by Martin Schneider
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06.27.2017
11:51 am
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European postcards featuring rare images of Grace Jones, Marianne Faithfull, Klaus Kinski & more
06.27.2017
11:45 am
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A Danish postcard featuring a publicity still of Klaus Kinski from the film ‘And God Said to Cain,’ 1970.
 
The images in this post were culled from a large collection I found online at a site called Filmstar Postcards—and once I started digging through the site’s massive alphabetical list, I couldn’t tear myself away. Historically, postcards have been used as promotional vehicles for everything and everyone. The vintage postcards in this post are of European origin with most hailing from Germany, France or Italy.

Of the astounding array of postcards cataloged by the site, I was most taken with images that captured the faces of the famous before they were well known. For instance, in the “B” section I found a rather astonishing Hungarian postcard of Bela Lugosi that shows a young, dashing looking future Dracula in a white suit staring stoically into the camera with a cigarette between his lips. While most of the celebrity postcards are of the stars of yesteryear, there were a few of more contemporary actors/performers such as Asia Argento, Grace Jones and Serge Gainsbourg. Check them all out below!
 

British postcard of Grace Jones.
 

French postcard of Marianne Faithfull.
 

 
Belgian promotion card by Taschen Gallery for the exhibition ‘Taxi Driver - unseen photographs from Scorsese’s Masterpiece.’ The image was a publicity still for the 1976 film ‘Taxi Driver.’
 

Italian postcard of Asia Argento used to promote the 1998 filmd ‘Viola Kisses Everybody.’
 
Many more after the jump…

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Posted by Cherrybomb
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06.27.2017
11:45 am
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The grotesquely chaotic paintings of Mu Pan
06.27.2017
11:10 am
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A painting by artist Mu Pan featuring Bruce Lee battling a puking Ultraman. Yes.
 
Some have compared the style of artist Mu Pan to that of another highly regarded artist, Ralph Steadman, the collaborator and long-time friend of Hunter S. Thompson. And much like the often ragged, tormented-looking characters in Steadman’s work, Mu Pan’s subjects appear to be engaged in violent clashes with antagonists that range from animal/human hybrids to martial arts hero Bruce Lee locked in battle with the alien/robot known as Ultraman. Excellent.

Pan was born in Taichung City, Taiwan which he left behind at the age of 21 when he moved to the U.S. He would attend college in New York where he acquired his B.F.A. and M.F.A. in Illustration and Illustration as Visual Essay at the School of Visual Arts. According to Pan, if he hadn’t gone to art school, his mother had threatened to send him to a military academy. Lucky for us, this scenario didn’t result in Pan in becoming a military lifer, and the remarkably talented artist now spends his days teaching Illustration to students at his alma mater.

If I had to take a stab at describing Pan’s style, I’d call it a chaotic, often barbaric blend of classic eastern-inspired folk art infused with modern pop culture references. And it looks as good as that sounds. I’ve posted a nice selection of Pan’s work below for you to spend time dissecting with your eyeballs. Some are slightly NSFW.
 

Watercolor.
 

Watercolor.
 

Another image of Bruce Lee by Pan, this time in watercolor.
 

‘Mermaid.’
 
More Mu Pan after the jump…

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Posted by Cherrybomb
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06.27.2017
11:10 am
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