Psychedelic Blasphemy! Diabolical art curated by the High Priest of the Church of Satan
12.09.2016
10:14 am

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Art
Books
Occult

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Orlon Borloff, untitled collage
 
Last spring, Dangerous Minds told you about “The Devil’s Reign,” a traveling exhibit (and its companion book) of Satanic art curated by Peter H. Gilmore, author of The Satanic Scriptures, and the High Priest of the Church of Satan for fifteen years. The exhibit endeavored to explore expressions of the diabolical from many cultures, though it mostly focused on ancient deities that were repurposed as devils and demons by Christianity, and, as that’s a pretty damned (haha) fertile artistic field to harvest, a second book has been published. The Devil’s Reign II: Psychedelic Blasphemy, as the title implies, focuses on trippy and surreal expressions of the profane, as Gilmore writes in his introduction:

Blasphemy is a conscious act of rejection, showing contempt for or derision of established sacred icons. Typically it is directed at objects, people, and concepts placed on pedestals by religions. As secularism has grown, one may also deem irreverence and disgust for things held above criticism by herd culture as today’s implementation of that idea. When we dismiss what by consensus is held to be inviolable, we are blasphemers.

The 1960s spawned a movement whose intent was the expansion of the mind through the use of mind altering substances as well as meditation or sensory stimulation/deprivation techniques. Shattering what had been prior paradigms, exponents of this “counter-culture” employed non-Western sources for inspiration in creating music and visual art as a means for sharing their own inner-explorations, often fueled by drug-induced “trips.” The art in particular was characterized by bright colors, complex geometric patterning, and often employed cartoon-derived stylization to emphasize heightened sensibilities and new juxtapositions of images that embraced surrealism.

The follow-up book, like the first, is limited to 666 copies, and both are available from Howl Books, an imprint run by Florida-based tattoo artist and gallerist Andy Howl. Dangerous Minds has graciously been permitted by Howl to share a selection of images.
 

Ian Bederman, “Mushroom Cave”
 

Ramon Maiden, “Hell’s Messenger”
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Leave a comment
Mind-blowing functional glass bongs of Stephen Hawking, Edgar Allan Poe, Die Antwoord & more
12.09.2016
09:45 am

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Amusing
Art
Drugs

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Edgar Allan Poe ‘Raven’ dabbing rig by the incredible glass artist, Rollerghoster.
 
I recently stumbled on a the fantastic Tumblr of glass artist, Rollerghoster and I’m pretty sure that you’ll all agree that the images of his fully-functional glass creations are some of the most incredible party machines you’ve ever seen. There are bongs… and then there are bongs!

The high-end glass drug-doing apparati in this post are called “dabbing rigs” or just “rigs” which, if you’re not familiar with pot culture are used in conjunction with cannabis concentrates like wax and hash oil. The process, known as “dabbing” is sort of a… let’s call it “scientific” way for stoners to get really high off of very little product. While involved, dabbing has become really popular in states that have legalized the sale of recreational marijuana and cannabis products.

And if you are wondering, yes, Rollerghoster does sell his fully functional works of art here and through his Tumblr where he notifies his 50K + followers of the where and when. Though I will caution you to not get too excited unless your pockets are of the deeper variety as most of Rollerghoster’s creations will run you anywhere from several hundred bucks to more than $10,000 each.
 

Hunter S. Thompson rig.
 

Nicola Tesla and Albert Einstein rig’s.
 

Stephen Hawking rig.
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
Sad-looking Lou Reed sweater is sad because it costs $2,730
12.08.2016
01:10 pm

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Amusing
Fashion
Heroes

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A spendy sweater made by LA-based company Enfants Riches Déprimés
 
And yes, I do realize that this image of Lou Reed is taken from the cover of his 1972 album Transformer however, you really can’t deny that Reed looks rather sad to be a part of a sweater that costs more than most monthly mortgage payments. You might call it, at $2,730, a “steal.”

In fact when you translate the name of the LA-based company that makes the garment Enfants Riches Déprimés from French to English it becomes “Depressed Rich Kids.” Which further reinforces the appearance of despair on poor Lou’s 100% merino wool face, don’t it? If the Lou sweater is a bit too spendy for you, then the same image also appears on a coat from les Enfants that will run you (just) a cool $1,160.

The Enfants Riches Déprimés brand is wildly popular with young Hollywood types whose parents pay all their bills.

Their customer base routinely shell out all kind of ridiculous cash for t-shirts complete with holes that cost $378, and jackets like this one named for Holden Caulfield from The Catcher in the Rye that retails for $800. Speaking of being depressed, Enfants even makes a $7000 cashmere noose which while posh enough for the jet-set to use to end it all, isn’t likely to be strong enough to use to actually hang yourself with. Too bad.
 

‘Lou Reed’ coat.
 

An image of the $7000 cashmere noose by Enfants Riches Déprimés .

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
Bob Hope and Raquel Welch’s unfortunate cover of ‘Rocky Raccoon,’ 1970
12.08.2016
12:46 pm

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Music
Television

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Rocky Raccoon sheet music; pictured here are its two very famous composers

There have been countless covers of Beatles songs over the decades, but surely one of the most regrettable has to be the version Raquel Welch and Bob Hope essayed of “Rocky Raccoon,” an original and enjoyable song off of side 2 of The White Album. The cover version Welch and Hope executed wasn’t a record, it was part of Raquel!, a Raquel Welch TV special that aired on CBS in 1970—DM’s Richard Metzger once described it as “a camp time capsule full of Bob Mackie dresses, Paco Rabanne spacesuits and Bob Hope singing “Rocky Raccoon” wearing a Davey Crockett hat.” Welch and Hope had a close relationship, she was a staple of his USO tours, one (perhaps two?) that the troops were always overjoyed to see.
 

 
The western motifs McCartney employed in his ditty provided the producers with an irresistible opportunity to put together a slapstick pastiche sketch à la The Monkees or Laugh-In or Benny Hill. Not that there’s anything wrong with that per se, but the gags are pretty lazy. Welch can’t pass up the chance to do Mae West, and I’m not sure if whatever Hope is doing qualifies as Sprechgesang or Sprechstimme, but it ain’t singing (he sounded better doing “Thanks for the Memory”). Welch’s voice, however, is very nice but she makes no effort to capture the spirit of the original.

John Lennon got the last word on this subject. As Geoffrey Giuliano reported in Blackbird: The Life and Times of Paul McCartney, Lennon’s quote on the subject ran, “I saw Bob Hope doing it once on the telly years ago, I just thanked God it wasn’t one of mine.”
 

 

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment