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For the lush who has everything: Hollowed-out A.A. ‘Big Book’ reveals a hidden hooch flask
07.14.2017
07:52 am
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What better place to store your hooch than in an Alcoholics Anonymous “Big Book?”

Punnily-named Etsy seller SleepyHollowedBooks deals exclusively in hand-made hollowed-out books, or “book safes.”

Another one of their listings first caught my eye, a hollowed-out Holy Bible that houses a paperback of LaVey’s The Satanic Bible.
 

Guaranteed to get you into Hell (if you believe in that sort of thing).
 
But it’s the A.A. book with the hidden flask that really won me over, conceptually. Pure genius.

This booze-safe is made from a copy of Alcoholics Anonymous, Fourth Edition from 2001. The cover is blue faux leather with gold print.

This is a one-of-a-kind item and may go fast. The price is $39, which is actually kind of a steal for a hand-made item that includes a flask.

According to the seller, the first two pages are not glued down, so at first glance, it appears to be a normal book. The book is glued with three layers of Mod Podge, reinforced inside with brad nails, and glued to the back with wood glue.
 

 

 
You can find more hollowed-out book treasures at the seller’s Etsy shop. The seller also offers a hollowed-out book on first-year parenting with a hidden flask.

Posted by Christopher Bickel
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07.14.2017
07:52 am
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Short animated film depicts the agony of alcoholism
07.10.2015
10:35 am
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Twelve-step programs have long achieved remarkable things using the simple technique of a single voice speaking with honesty and humility, and it is precisely this device that works so smashingly well in this animated short crafted by the production company Buck for Alcoholics Anonymous.

In “Doors,” the simple aural method of a multitude of voices detailing (necessarily incompletely) the abjectness of their situations is singularly effective, singularly moving, singularly powerful. The iconic and yet entirely fluid visuals in the short reminds me a great deal of the work of Eric Drooker, whose wordless novel Flood of some years ago evinced similar feelings of helplessness, dread, isolation, and desperation.
 

 
“I’m Justin H., I’m an alcoholic.” “I had no friends, I burned every single bridge, my family had cut ties from me, I was unemployable. ... All of those things because, you know, drinking was more important than anything else.” The snippets start out bleak but, inevitably, turn more hopeful as the narrative edges towards probably the planet’s most effective counter to dipsomania—Alcoholics Anonymous.

Just as AA meeting structurally resemble Moth storytelling gatherings, so too do these recorded clips remind one of This American Life—but so many right-thinking NPR addicts have become trained in empathizing with just such voices.

By the time the short had ended I was almost disappointed to see that it was, no matter how well executed, yes, a commercial for AA. But on second thought, that’s the best use for such a fine piece of work.
 

 
via BOOOOOOOM!

Posted by Martin Schneider
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07.10.2015
10:35 am
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