follow us in feedly
David Lynch is throwing a very Lynchian music & film festival (and it’ll probably be a weird blast)
06.21.2016
03:49 pm

Topics:
Movies
Music
Television

Tags:
David Lynch


 
David Lynch is like our nation’s super-fun, super-weird uncle, and it’s high time that he decided to get involved with a music festival. To his credit, he’s not riding the coattails of an established festival but has started one up from scratch.

It’s called the Festival of Disruption, and it’s going to happen in downtown Los Angeles on October 8 and 9. Lynch has put together the kind of impressive lineup of guests that you can only muster if you’ve long since become Hollywood royalty (albeit in a surrealist sort of way).

The headliners are Robert Plant and the Sensational Space Shifters. Joining them will be St. Vincent, Questlove, and Rhye, as well as a performance of music from Twin Peaks involving Sky Ferreira, Xiu Xiu, and Lynch’s axiomatic composer Angelo Badalamenti.

There will also be “talks” with figures such as the stars of Lynch’s masterpiece Blue Velvet (Kyle MacLachlan & Laura Dern), Blondie’s Debbie Harry and Chris Stein, and Mel Brooks, who was Lynch’s producer on The Elephant Man. There will also be screenings of Lynch’s films, daily Transcendental Meditation sessions, and more.

The venue is the Ace Theatre Hotel and Theatre, located at 929 South Broadway. Tickets go on sale Friday, June 24th at 10:00 a.m. PST. 100% of the proceeds will benefit the David Lynch Foundation, whose mission is reducing toxic stress and trauma among at-risk populations, including victims of domestic violence, veterans suffering from PTSD, and underserved urban youth, through the evidence-based Transcendental Meditation technique.

More after the jump…

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Amazing movie posters for films by Hitchcock, Kubrick and Lynch that we’ll never get to see

fro-design-company23.jpg
Salvador Dali’s ‘Giraffes on Horseback Salad’ (1937)
 
Most film directors have a list of movie projects they never manage to make. Some are started like Orson Welles’ Don Quixote but never finished—though posthumously released in a re-edited form. Others like Hitchcock’s R.R.R.R. never quite make it from idea to script to studio green light.

L.A. based artist and designer Fernando Reza has created a stupendous selection of film posters for movie projects by directors like Hitchcock, Welles, Stanley Kubrick, David Lynch and even Salvador Dali that were discussed, planned, and even partially filmed but never completed.

Take for example Salvador Dali who planned to make a movie with the Marx Brothers called Giraffes on Horseback Salad in 1937. Dali was friends with Harpo Marx and the pair decided to work together on a film project. Dali had already made two short films with Luis Bunuel (Un Chien Andalou and L’Age d’or) and would later go on to collaborate with Walt Disney and Alfred Hitchcock designing dream sequences for Dumbo and Spellbound.

Dali and Marx concocted a story about an aristocrat played by Harpo falling in love with a woman whose face is never revealed. The great Surrealist intended to use the film to show:

...the continuous struggle between the imaginative life as depicted in the old myths and the practical and rational life of contemporary society.

The film was to include scenes with a “horde of burning giraffes wearing gas masks, and Harpo catching dwarves with a net.” A script was apparently written but the other Marx Brothers nixed the idea thinking the idea a stinker and the script not very funny.
 
fro-design-company26.jpg
Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘Kaleidoscope’ aka ‘Frenzy’ (1964-67).
 
Alfred Hitchcock wanted to make a prequel to Shadow of Doubt with another “Merry Widow Murderer” luring women to their grisly deaths. As with Psycho, Hitchcock had devised three set pieces to focus on the three gruesome murders carried out by the deviant sex-fiend. The first murder was to take place by a waterfall; the second on board a disused warship; the third in an oil refinery against brightly colored oil drums. 

Unlike Psycho or Shadow of Doubt there was no moral counterpoint to the “relentless sex and violence” shown onscreen. A script was written and test scenes shot. Among the actors considered for the lead role were Michael Caine, Robert Redford and David Hemmings. The film was basically a slasher movie a decade ahead of its time. Universal Studios vetoed the idea—thinking Hitchcock’s movie too amoral and too dark.
 
Continues after the jump…

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
David Lynch ‘Eraserhead’ dolls!
06.03.2016
12:13 pm

Topics:
Movies

Tags:
David Lynch
Eraserhead
Jack Nance


 
Ever thought you’d see a Jack Nance, a Lady in the Radiator or that creepy-but-still-cuddly baby from David Lynch’s Eraserhead in doll form?

Me neither. But here I am blogging about them. They’re handmade by an Australia-based outfit called Slice of Mod Pie.

There’s hardly any information about the dolls in the listing so I’m not going to pretend to know anything about them to use up extra characters here. Because I don’t. I do like them very much, though. They look happy, too. I like that.

The price for each one is $55.84.


 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
For mommy’s little Frank Booth: It’s the ‘Blue Velvet’ play set!
05.05.2016
09:44 am

Topics:
Amusing
Movies

Tags:
David Lynch
Blue Velvet
Frank Booth


 
Parents, is it taking forever for junior to utter his first fuckwords? Then help your little sadist grow up fast with the Blue Velvet play set! From a swatch of blue fabric and an inhalant mask to a decomposing ear and a bottle of PBR, it’s got everything* your toddler needs to act out his cruelest fantasies.

Lynchland, the source of the shot above, reports that this prototype was spotted at last month’s Monsterpalooza convention. (Instagram user Rebekah McKendry uploaded the only other snap of the package I could find.)

If you’d like to get your hands on one, perhaps you should nag the inventor, Skullclown, about mass-producing these. But like Frank says, be polite!

Here’s to your fuck, ages three and up!
 

 
*1968 Dodge Charger and “well-dressed man” disguise sold separately.

Posted by Oliver Hall | Leave a comment
Someone made an ‘Eraserhead’ baby cake
04.29.2016
12:13 pm

Topics:
Food
Movies

Tags:
David Lynch
Eraserhead


 
I wish there were more images of this Eraserhead baby cake by Debbie Does Cakes, but sadly I only have this one shot. It’s pretty great, though. I’m assuming some diehard David Lynch fan asked for this custom design.

I wonder what it tasted like? And what exactly was the (presumably foul) occasion this cake was made for? Don’t you want to know? No?

Below, a short scene of the Eraserhead baby to refresh your memory (although, how could anyone one forget this?!)

 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Captain Beefheart meets David Lynch in ‘Some YoYo Stuff’


 
In the early 1990s Anton Corbijn made a peculiar short movie called “Some YoYo Stuff” featuring Don Van Vliet, a.k.a. Captain Beefheart. The movie is in black-and-white and lasts a little under 13 minutes. Most of the movie is the Captain’s face in front of a large screen on which words and images appear. The Captain addresses the topics projected onto the screen in his elliptical way. David Lynch even gets into the act.

Corbijn has been taking pictures of prominent musicians since the mid-1970s, when he worked for NME. He is noted for luminous b/w pictures of rock icons—his work appears on the cover of U2’s The Joshua Tree; as it happens, it appears that “Some YoYo Stuff” was likewise shot in Joshua Tree National Park.
 

 
Here’s Corbijn in the pages of World Art in 1998 describing the movie:
 

It was a simple affair to make the film: His mother sue opens the movie with the photograph that I took when Don and I first met, saying: “This is Don, my son,” and, apart from David Lynch asking him a few questions via projected film, it is all Don’s thoughts on various matters. Some funny, some serious, but all sharp, poetic and beautiful. You really want to hear every single word he says—whether it’s about paint, Miles Davis, an ear (“nice sculpture”) or the desert. 

 
My colleague Marc Campbell eloquently described the difficulty of capturing the essence of Beefheart on film several years ago:
 

His writing and occasional communiques were like those of a modernist monk of the left hand school. He spoke in an ancient craggy voice that sounded like hollow bones being rubbed together. Corbijn’s film communicates the desert father aspect of Beefheart’s existence. There’s an otherworldliness about the whole thing that seems as though it is being beamed in from another planet.

 
More after the jump…

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Draw David Lynch’s hair
01.20.2016
11:09 am

Topics:
Amusing
Art
Heroes

Tags:
David Lynch


 
The good people at Welcome To Twin Peaks have shared a wonderful web widget with which you can kill some quality time today—”David Lynch Doodle.” It’s a caricature of Lynch (who turns 70 today) with his epic haircut lopped off, and you get to draw it in, with eleven simulated brushes to choose from. (While you justly make fun of my shitty efforts, bear in mind that I went to art school. And graduated. In lots of debt.)
 

 

 
More after the jump…

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Leave a comment
David Lynch’s life advice: ‘Keep your eye on the doughnut’
12.25.2015
05:58 am

Topics:
Amusing
Food

Tags:
David Lynch
donuts
doughnuts


 

“The hole is so deep and so bad; the Doughnut is a beautiful thing.” ~ David Lynch

There’s not much to say here. Just 1 minute of life advice from David Lynch about keeping your eye on the doughnut. Don’t forget it folks, this might be the most important thing you’ll ever hear.

 
h/t Joe Reifer

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Make ‘Dune’ Spice-Filled Sandworm Bread for the holidays!
12.04.2015
08:48 am

Topics:
Amusing
Food
Movies

Tags:
David Lynch
Dune
sandworm


 
This is one of the best holiday bread/cake recipes I’ve ever seen! A spiced-filled Dune sandworm!

Now, I haven’t made this sucker yet—so I don’t know what it tastes like—but I fully intend to test my culinary skills this weekend and try this worm out.

I don’t know how many people would watch David Lynch’s take on Dune and see something yummy when the grotesque sandworms are onscreen, but Chris-Rachael Oseland over at The Kitchen Overlord came up with this brilliant-looking recipe. “The final result is even more delicious than it looks. Now, you too can make a proud, impressive, spice-scented Great Maker of Arrakis,” she writes. I believe her.

FYI, there are pretty detailed steps to follow at The Kitchen Overlord for your edible Dune sandworm. Here are the ingredients to get your tasting buds salivating:


 
Spice-Filled Sandworm Bread

SANDWORM DOUGH:

1 1/2 cups warm water
2 tbsp yeast
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1 tbsp cinnamon
3 eggs
¼ cup slightly cooled melted butter
2 tsp salt
6 ½ – 7 cups bread flour

SPICE FILLING:

2 tbsp garam masala (or pumpkin pie spice, or Chinese five spice powder, by preference)
2 tsp cinnamon
3/4 cup brown sugar (or 1/2 cup brown sugar and 1/4 cup white sugar if you want it less sticky)
1/4 cup melted butter
sliced blanched almonds
1/2 cup raisins (optional)

GLAZE:

3/4 cup powdered sugar
¼ cup water
1 tsp cinnamon or garam masala
1 tsp vanilla extract

Now that I’ve hopefully piqued your interests with the ingredients, please follow the step-by-step cooking instructions that you’ll find here.

h/t Colihouse on Facebook

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Art film made from behind-the-scenes footage of ‘Blue Velvet’
09.21.2015
02:50 pm

Topics:
Movies

Tags:
David Lynch
Blue Velvet
Peter Braatz


 
If I had to pick my favorite movie from the 1980s, it’d be a good long while before I thought of a better candidate than David Lynch’s Blue Velvet, which came out in 1986. Blue Velvet was Lynch’s redemptive triumph after the time-consuming and expensive flop Dune, which was based on Frank Herbert’s tortuous sci-fi novel.

For reasons unknown, Lynch invited a German photographer named Peter Braatz to Wilmington, North Carolina (yes, that’s right, not Oregon or Washington) to come and document the shooting of Blue Velvet. Braatz titled his nearly hour-long movie “No Frank in Lumberton”; any fans of the movie will instantly understand “Frank” to mean the malevolent character played by Dennis Hopper and “Lumberton” to mean the idyllic logging community in which the action takes place.
 

 
You won’t “learn” anything in the ordinary sense from the movie, it’s an impressionistic tone-poem on Lynch and Blue Velvet that uses grainy footage of Lynch, Isabella Rossellini, Jack Nance, Kyle MacLachlan, et al.; unmotivated cutaways to exercising football players; and plenty of asynchronous sound and music. Sometimes, just for fun, Braatz uses actual dialogue from the movie as the vocal track, such as Dorothy Vallens’ pained cry to “Frank!” to leave poor Jeffrey alone.

This kind of movie strikes me as being very 1980s, it’s “experimental” and self-indulgent and kind of… drunk of video cutting techniques in a way that a movie like this would never be today. But I definitely enjoyed watching it—it’s an “audiovisual experience” first and foremost that just happens to take as its subject one of the most vivid films of American cinema. To Braatz’s credit, the movie does have something of the creepy audio gestalt that Lynch achieved so many times in his work.
 

 

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
‘In Heaven’: The Lady in the Radiator from ‘Eraserhead’ live in concert
08.17.2015
11:14 am

Topics:
Art
Movies
Music

Tags:
David Lynch
Eraserhead
Laurel Near


 
Welcome to Twin Peaks has just announced that Laurel Near, the dream-haunting Lady in the Radiator from David Lynch’s debut feature Eraserhead, will perform her character’s signature song “In Heaven” in Philadelphia, as part of PhilaMOCA‘s annual Eraserhood Forever Lynch tribute. The event is being held on Saturday, October 3rd.

The Lady In The Radiator from Eraserhead, Laurel Near, is set to perform Peter Ivers’ haunting “In Heaven” song LIVE at PhilaMOCA‘s 4th annual David Lynch celebration, Eraserhood Forever. The event space is a former tombstone and mausoleum showroom located right in the middle of the neighborhood that inspired David Lynch for his first feature as he lived there across the old city morgue on 13th and Wood. To make it even more otherworldly, the actress/singer will be backed by the Divine Hand Ensemble, an enchanting chamber orchestra led by Mano Divina on theremin.

 

 
Eraserhood Forever is becoming quite the large event—a call for artists was recently issued for a related art exhibit, and the full lineup includes Lynch-themed bands, audiovisual works, DJ sets, and even Lynchian burlesque which could either be the hottest or most terrifying thing ever.

Here’s the song. If you’re totally unfamiliar with Eraserhead, this is going to seem utterly baffling and nightmarish. Don’t worry, I’ve seen it a zillion times and it’s still baffling and nightmarish to me, too. This is actually quite calming compared to her OTHER scene.
 

 
And for no other reason than that it’s awesome, here’s the Pixies’ cover of the song.
 

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Leave a comment
Teach your kids their ABC’s with evil: David Lynch’s horrific 1968 short, ‘The Alphabet’
07.21.2015
10:00 am

Topics:
Animation
Movies

Tags:
David Lynch


 
Prior to my first viewing of Eraserhead, I was warned I’d be horrified and repulsed beyond all belief. Instead, I was stricken with maternal concern for the sickly “baby,” and afflicted with sympathetic anxiety for its suffering parents; as far as I was concerned, David Lynch had created an avant-garde family melodrama, albeit in the aesthetics of a particularly affecting dark and morbid surrealism. Knowing now that Lynch had a toddler during the making of the film lends some credibility to my interpretation. Lynch’s portrayal of “children” is obviously pretty damned disturbing, but I’d argue his more horrifying use of kiddies comes from his 1968 short, “The Alphabet.”

This partially animated experimental film was inspired by the young niece of Lynch’s wife Peggy—the child had been reciting the alphabet in her sleep during a nightmare. Lynch painted Peggy white and filmed her in a room painted black for optimum eerie contrast. In a stark and ghostly bed, she is tormented by a phantasmal alphabet in a series of erratic, disorienting shots before blood spatters sheets; the results are absolutely hellish. The distorted crying you hear in “The Alphabet” is Lynch’s baby daughter, so the film truly is a family affair.
 

Posted by Amber Frost | Leave a comment
Title sequence of ‘Twin Peaks’ recreated using nothing but paper
05.21.2015
12:13 pm

Topics:
Art
Television

Tags:
David Lynch
Twin Peaks


 
As I write this, Showtime and David Lynch have been going back and forth on the possibility of new episodes of Twin Peaks, the strikingly original TV show that aired on ABC in 1990 and 1991, setting a new bar (that has never really been surpassed) for brazenly experimental programming in an utterly mainstream context. A month ago Lynch made it known that “not enough money was offered to do the script the way I felt it needed to be done.” However, Twin Peaks fans rejoiced when Lynch tweeted the following message last week:
 

 
A new web project called And The World Was Paper is dedicated to the task of recreating bits of famous video using nothing but artfully cut-up pieces of colorful paper (somewhat like South Park). There are only two videos up at this point, but weekly installments have been promised, with new episodes on the way “every other Monday.” One video re-creates the trailer for Star Wars: The Force Awakens, and the other is the Twin Peaks title sequence.

I must say, this is very nicely done. It took some creative positioning of my browser windows, but I was able to watch the cut-paper version and the real version side by side, and it’s uncanny how perfectly the homage matches the original.

It never occurred to me before how much of the title sequence is just footage of things happening in factories.
 

 
via The World’s Best Ever
 

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
David Lynch voices a Barbie to accept an award for transcendental meditation because… David Lynch?
05.08.2015
11:08 am

Topics:
Movies

Tags:
David Lynch
Barbie


 
The films and television of David Lynch delight us with their strangeness, but they often pale in comparison to the man’s “extracurricular” projects. There’s the time he campaigned for Laura Dern’s Oscar by just hanging out in high traffic areas of Los Angeles with a giant sign and a live cow. There’s also the haunting public service announcement he did on New York City’s rat problem—pickup your garbage, people! His line of women’s sportswear was a great left turn, but dude has topped himself with this acceptance speech for his 2015 Tribeca Disruptive Innovation Award in recognition of his contributions to transcendental meditation.

Instead of just, you know, accepting the award, Lynch allowed “Trixie,” a Barbie doll shot in close-up, to serve as his proxy. In Lynch’s own voice, Trixie says her form of meditation consists of getting naked and “laying in the sun at the beach,” then Trixie and Lynch have a short dialogue. This comes not too long after Lynch used a Barbie in an ad for his signature line of coffee, but was asked by toy company Mattel Inc to take it down. I assume this use of Barbie poses no legal risk, as this is not a commercial, and merely a lovely moment of surreal play.
 

 
Via Welcome to Twin Peaks

Posted by Amber Frost | Leave a comment
The time David Lynch campaigned for Laura Dern’s Oscar… with a live cow
03.06.2015
01:39 pm

Topics:
Movies

Tags:
David Lynch


 
For me, it’s difficult at this point to be surprised by anything David Lynch does outside of his cinematic endeavors. What’s that you say? He’s teaching the world his quinoa recipe? Of course he is. It’s probably delicious. And now he’s designing women sports wear? I’ll bet it’s great! I’d wear a David Lynch creation to Pilates in a heartbeat. But did you know that in 2006, he personally campaigned on behalf of Laura Dern so she’d get an Oscar nomination for Inland Empire on the corner of Hollywood Boulevard and La Brea, with a live cow? (He was in other locations, too, such as the parking lot of the former Tower Records on Sunset.)

Luckily, some very excited Lynch fans managed a little impromptu interview with him at the time. He was very warm and diplomatic, obviously genuinely acting on behalf of Dern, but the presence of the cow was not made totally clear. His explanation for his bovine companion was, “Without cheese there wouldn’t be an Inland Empire,” (the same text on the banner he had with him) and then, “Cheese is made from milk. Get it?” (I do not.)

Dern didn’t get the nomination, but what a nice, supportive, and deeply Lynchian gesture!
 

 
Via Welcome to Twin Peaks

Posted by Amber Frost | Leave a comment
Page 1 of 5  1 2 3 >  Last ›