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‘The Process Of Delving Into The Black Abyss’: A new film by artist Prins Preben
03.05.2013
04:33 pm

Topics:
Art

Tags:
H. P. Lovecraft
Norway
Prins Preben
Rorschach test

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The latest short film from Norwegian artist Prins Preben was inspired by a quote from H. P. Lovecraft:

The process of delving into the black abyss is to me the keenest form of fascination.

Simple, hypnotic and effective—like a moving Rorschach inkblot where we can picture our own demons.
 

 
Previously on Dangerous Minds

‘Alien or Satan’: A short film by artist Prins Preben


 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
H. P. Lovecraft action figure
06.14.2012
10:18 am

Topics:
Art
Books
Design

Tags:
Action Figures
H. P. Lovecraft


 
A hand-molded H.P. Lovecraft action figure by Alex CF.

According to the website, it’s not available yet, but will be soon. You can contact merrylinhouse AT gmail.com for all inquires.

Via Super Punch

 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
The house from H. P. Lovecraft’s ‘The Shunned Room’ is for sale

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The family home featured in H. P. Lovecraft’s story “The Shunned House” is up for sale. Situated at 135 Benefit Street in Providence, Rhode Island, this south-facing house was built circa 1764, and offers: 

Original wideboard floors, period details, 1/3 acre landscaped garden, 4 terraced areas, pergola, koi pond, 2 car garage with potting shed

All of which can be yours for $925,000, details here.

Lovecraft’s story describes the mansion house on Benefit Street, as the building where Edgar Allan Poe:

...the world’s greatest master of the terrible and the bizarre was obliged to pass a particular house on the eastern side of the street; a dingy, antiquated structure perched on the abruptly rising side hill, with a great unkempt yard dating from a time when the region was partly open country. It does not appear that he ever wrote or spoke of it, nor is there any evidence that he even noticed it. And yet that house, to the two persons in possession of certain information, equals or outranks in horror the wildest fantasy of the genius who so often passed it unknowingly, and stands starkly leering as a symbol of all that is unutterably hideous.

Interestingly, it was a house in New Jersey that inspired Lovercraft’s tale, though 135 Benefit Street does have its own strange history:

Because of its policy of religious tolerance, early Providence had no common burying ground, no single place where everyone agreed to bury their dead. So, in accordance with the practice of the day, each family had a plot on their own land which served as a family graveyard. To us, this might seem a bit ghoulish, but it was just business as usual in colonial America.

Around the time of the Revolution, Back Street was widened and straightened and renamed Benefit Street, to relieve the heavy traffic along the Towne Street (now South Main) and to be “a Benefit for All.” The remains in all those little family plots were removed to North Burial Ground, then just recently opened. Allegedly, though, some of the bodies were left behind, and still remain buried here to this day. And, according to local legend, a Huguenot couple lived, died, and was buried on the site of #135, and were among the bodies that were missed.

When Stephen Harris built this house, his family fell on hard times. Harris was a well-to-do merchant in Providence, and owned several merchant vessels; it is said that a few of those vessels were lost at sea shortly after the completion of the house. This led to other financial problems. Mrs. Harris also had a hard time—several of her children died, and others were stillborn. (I was told by the current resident, who has done her own research into the house’s history, that there was never a live birth in the house.) Probably the most (melo)dramatic part of the legend, however, is Mrs. Harris’s descent into madness, and her confinement to an upstairs room. She was occasionally heard to shriek out the window of this room, but in French—a language she didn’t know. Where could she have picked it up? Dead Huguenots, anyone?

Read H. P. Lovecraft’s “The Shunned Room” here.
 
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Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
A Lovecraft Retrospective: Artists Inspired by H.P. Lovecraft
08.28.2009
02:45 pm

Topics:
Books

Tags:
H. P. Lovecraft

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Recently got a look at the gigantic coffee table book A Lovecraft Retrospective: Artists Inspired by H.P. Lovecraft. 400 pages, 400 dollars (though discounted everywhere), and honking huge hardback containing big renditions of Lovecraft-inspired art from H. P.‘s day until now. A truly terrifying and awe-inspiring thing to behold…!

Millipede Press is pleased to announce A Lovecraft Retrospective: Artists Inspired by H.P. Lovecraft. This huge tome is four hundred pages long and features the work of over forty artists, including J.K. Potter, H.R. Giger, Raymond Bayless, Ian Miller, Virgil Finlay, Lee Brown Coye, Rowena Morrill, Bob Eggleton, Allen Koszowski, Mike Mignola, Michael Whelan, John Coulthart, Harry O. Morris, John Jude Palencar, and dozens of others, as well as twenty thousand words of original essays.

This is an art book unlike anything ever published. Many works have never before seen publication, many are printed as special multi-page fold-outs, and several have detail views. A thumbnail gallery allows you an overview of the entire contents of the book and provides notations on each artist, work title, publication information, size, and location.

Because of its sheer size and scope, A Lovecraft Retrospective will never be reprinted and will sell out very quickly. Twenty years down the road, people will be paying huge prices for this book because of its range and the quality of reproductions. This is the H.P. Lovecraft fan’s dream come true.

(Link here.)

Posted by Jason Louv | Leave a comment