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A Japanese ‘young lovers’ sex guide from the ‘60s
01.04.2012
10:59 am

Topics:
History
Sex

Tags:
Japan
Sex
Japanese


 
Hello Damage posted this rather odd Japanese sex-tip book from the 60s online. Now, I can’t read Japanese, so I don’t know if Hello Damage is pulling non-Japansese speakers legs with the translations or not? You decide. And if you haven’t figured it out by the title already, it’s probably NSFW.
 

 
(via reddit)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Lovely vintage Japanese postcards
01.26.2011
05:05 pm

Topics:
Art
History

Tags:
Japan
Japanese
Postcards

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A colorful assortment of antique cute postcards in Japan from the book Antique Cute Postcards in Japan (Nippon no kawaii ehagaki) by Hiroki Hayashi. The ones with Betty Boop are my favorite.

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See more postcards after the jump…

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Mega Freaky Japanese Children’s Book Art By Gojin Ishihara
07.29.2010
11:11 pm

Topics:
Art
Idiocracy
Pop Culture

Tags:
Comics
Weird
Japanese

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These wild illustrations by Gojin Ishihara are from Japanese children’s books published in the 1970s.

The illustrations are from the Illustrated Book Of Japanese Monsters and various educational and entertainment-oriented publications for children.

 
More wildness after the jump…

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
July 26, 1943: Los Angeles Invaded by Smog!

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Smog makes it hard to see the Los Angeles Civic Center on Jan. 5, 1948. Photo: Los Angeles Times Photographic Archive/UCLA Library
 
In this age of climate-change consciousness, we’ve been thinking of pollution in epic-scale terms for so many decades that it’s become difficult to perceive it locally or episodically. On Wired.com’s This Day in Tech blog, Jess McNally notes  that on this day 67 years ago, residents of Los Angeles initially suspected that the unseasonable eye-stinging haze descending on their city was a Japanese chemical attack:

As residents would later find out, the fog was not from an outside attacker, but from their own vehicles and factories. Massive wartime immigration to a city built for cars had made L.A. the largest car market the industry had ever seen. But the influx of cars and industry, combined with a geography that traps fumes like a big bowl, had caught up with Angelenos.

 
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Susan Morrow (left) and Linda Hawkins wipe tears from their eyes on a downtown street during a smoggy day in October 1964. Photo: Los Angeles Times Photographic Archive/UCLA Library
 
It took Arie Jan Haagen-Smit, a Dutch scientist working at the California Institute of Technology, to point that out, but that wasn’t until the early ‘50s. Although the term smog—a portmanteau of smoke and fog—was coined in the early 20th century, L.A. made it truly famous.

Check out Wired’s fascinating selection of photos from the UCLA Library depicting the Southland’s struggle against smog from the 1940s through the 1960s.

 

Posted by Ron Nachmann | Leave a comment