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Street art homages to Frank Zappa, Lemmy, David Bowie, Bon Scott, Ian Curtis & more

Frank Zappa street art mural under a bridge in London by James Mayle and Leigh Drummond
A massive mural of Frank Zappa under a bridge in London by artists James Mayle and Leigh Drummond.

I recently came across images of some beautiful street murals of both the sadly recently departed Lemmy Kilmister and David Bowie—which is what got me cooking up this post chock full of graffiti and street art homages to notable musicians and rock stars who are no longer with us.

Of the many public pieces, photographed at places all around the globe, I’m especially fond of the Lemmy/Bowie hybrid that popped up on a utility box in front of a restaurant in Denver, Colorado shortly after Bowie passed on January 10th, 2016, as well as a haunting image of Joe Strummer that was painted on the side of a rusted old van.
 
Lemmy/Bowie street art mashup in Denver, Colorado
Lemmy/Bowie street art mashup in Denver, Colorado.
 
Joe Strummer mural painted on the side of a van by French artist, Jef Aerosol
Joe Strummer mural painted on the side of a van by French artist, Jef Aerosol.
 
Inspired street art dedicated to everyone from Joy Division’s Ian Curtis to James Brown, after the jump…

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
Watch and listen to Lemmy’s early bands The Rockin’ Vickers and Sam Gopal

001rocvic.jpg
 
The path to success can often have many false starts. For Ian Fraser Kilmister—the man, the myth, later known simply as Lemmy—his early success was a useful apprenticeship for his later career.

The first real clue as to what he would do with his life came when Lemmy saw the Beatles at the Cavern Club in 1963. They were thrilling, they were fab, and they were doing something Lemmy knew he would be good at too. But how the fuck do you get started? He’d left school, was working in dead end jobs and playing in bars with local bands for kicks. Seeing the Beatles made him focus on his music career.

After a few misfires, Lemmy joined The Rockin’ Vickers as guitarist in 1965. The group was originally called Reverend Black and The Rocking Vicars—known for their upbeat live act and clerical dog collar outfits. The band came to the attention of American record producer—known for his work with The Who and The Kinks—Shel Talmy and a record deal was signed.
 
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A few singles and tours followed. By the time Lemmy joined, the band had shortened their name to the Rockin’ Vickers—as “Vicars” was thought by some to be “blasphemous.” The Vickers were (allegedly) the first band to play behind the Iron Curtain—Yugoslavia in 1965—and with Lemmy on guitar were hailed as “one of the hardest rocking live bands around.” Lemmy played guitar “with his back to the audience ‘windmilling’ power chords (like Pete Townshend)” but the sound, their sound—well their sound on disc—was just like many other beat combos of the day, which can be heard on their singles “It’s Alright” and—a cover of the Ray Davies’ song—“Dandy.”
 

‘It’s Alright’—The Rockin’ Vickers.
 

‘Dandy’—The Rockin’ Vickers.
 
Lemmy moved to Manchester, but covering songs and playing guitar was soon not enough for the nascent rocker. In 1967, he quit the band and moved to London where he shared a flat with Jimi Hendrix’s bass guitarist Noel Redding. Lemmy—still using the name Ian Willis—briefly worked as a roadie for Hendrix before joining tabla player Sam Gopal and his band (aka Sam Gopal’s Dream).
 
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Sam Gopal’s Dream was a psychedelic rock band that had achieved some success on London’s underground scene in 1967. Following a line-up change in 1968, Gopal brought in Lemmy as lead singer, along with Phil Duke and Roger D’Elia—shortening the band’s name to just Sam Gopal.
 

‘Escalator’—Sam Gopal (written and sung by Lemmy).
 
Lemmy started writing songs and the band recorded them for the album Escalator. Released in 1969, it showcased Lemmy’s compositions and vocals.

To get an idea of the kind of psychedelic thing Lemmy and co. were into here he is lip syncing (badly) a number called “The Sky Is Burning” with Sam Gopal on a boat for French TV circa 1969.
 

 
More early Lemmy, after the jump…

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‘I would love to play for you, but I can’t’: Lemmy stops gig after two songs for health reasons
09.02.2015
11:33 am

Topics:
Heroes
Music

Tags:
Lemmy Kilmister
Motörhead


 
It’s one of the more poignant entries on Setlist.fm I’ve ever read, by far. It’s a list of the songs played at last night’s Motörhead show at Emo’s in Austin, Texas, and it reads, as follows, in full:

1. Damage Case
2. Stay Clean
3. Metropolis (partial)

Note: Lemmy left stage at the start of the third song because he wasn’t feeling well.

Rock and roll fans the world over have been tracking the news about Motörhead’s beloved bassist and frontman Lemmy Kilmister, who is still touring at the age of 69 against the advice of doctors. (Lemmy turns 70 on Christmas Eve of this year.)

Just a couple of weeks ago, the news that Lemmy was switching from his beloved whisky to vodka for health reasons made the rounds. Some observers pointed out the contradiction inherent in Lemmy’s big quote from that story, “I am still indestructible.” Lemmy was treated for a hematoma in 2013, and he has also been fitted for a defibrillator.

This week Lemmy’s health issues are finally coming to a head in a serious way. On Thursday Lemmy similarly cut the show in Salt Lake City short because he was having difficulty breathing in the thin air of the high-altitude city. The next night’s show, in Denver, was cancelled altogether for the same reason.

Here’s a report from Eduardo Rivadavia at Ultimate Classic Rock:

We were in attendance at last night’s Austin show, and can report that the evening’s activities got under way normally enough, with a well-received set from Pennsylvania stoner rockers Crobot, and then a quite commanding one from New Wave of British Heavy Metal survivors Saxon.

Unfortunately, Lemmy seemed shaky from the start, as he ambled onto the stage looking noticeably gaunt and tried to sing the first number, “Damage Case,” clearly out of breath and at half speed. Meanwhile, guitarist Phil Campbell was doing everything he could to compensate by running about and engaging the audience much more than is his habit. Drummer Mikkey Dee also seemed to be trying to will Lemmy onward with his more measured but typically powerful attack.

Alas, the situation did not improve as Motorhead struggled to complete another Overkill standard, “Stay Clean.” After greeting his fans and admitting he was still under the weather, Lemmy lasted barely one minute into their next song, “Metropolis,” before dropping his arms, backing away from his microphone, and conceding defeat in obvious disgust, as his bandmates simultaneously ground to a feedback-screeching halt.

As for the crowd, many of whom were no doubt aware of the frontman’s recent health issues, they had nothing but supportive chants of “Lemmy! Lemmy! Lemmy!” — especially once Kilmister briefly returned to the microphone, leaning on his now familiar cane, and apologized yet again for his inability to carry on, leaving those assembled no choice but to turn away and start filing out.

Motörhead is touring to support its 22nd studio album, Bad Magic. The trek began on Aug. 19, in Riverside, Calif., and is slated to run until February. Their next scheduled show is tonight in San Antonio’s Aztec Theatre—the only information I was able to find out about that show comes from the well-known German tabloid BILD, which reported that the San Antonio show “fällt definitiv aus”—is definitely cancelled.

You can watch Lemmy’s heartbreaking announcement, as well as the loud support of the fans at the venue, right here:
 

 
via Ultimate Classic Rock

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
‘I am still indestructible’: Lemmy has switched from whisky to vodka for health reasons
08.14.2015
02:47 pm

Topics:
Drugs
Music

Tags:
Lemmy Kilmister
Motörhead
booze


 
Lemmy Kilmister of the legendary heavy metal band Motörhead recently announced that he’s abandoned his beloved whisky in favor of vodka. He’s been suffering lately from gastric distress and dehydration, and gigs have been cancelled as a result.

Instead of instead of his customary Jack Daniels and coke, Lemmy now quaffs vodka and orange juice to help keep his diabetes in check.

Personally, for me that would be too high a price to pay. But that’s just my opinion.

As usual, Lemmy’s quotes on the subject were pretty choice.

“I like orange juice better,” he told The Guardian. “So, Coca-Cola can fuck off.”

He also said, “Apparently I am still indestructible.” To which we all say, Amen!

Here’s Motörhead giving Toronto the business in 1982:
 

 

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Get your holiday started early with Lemmy’s recipe for ‘Krakatoa Surprise’
12.17.2013
12:14 pm

Topics:
Amusing
Food
Music

Tags:
Lemmy Kilmister


 
Just in time for the holidays, a recipe for “Krakatoa Surprise,” a disgusting delicacy created by none other than Lemmy. The recipe comes from the book Mosh Potatoes: Recipes, Anecdotes, and Mayhem from the Heavyweights of Heavy Metal.


Krakatoa Surprise

¼ pound flour
½ pound chocolate syrup
¼ pound refried beans
½ pound curry powder
1 bottle strawberry syrup
¼ bottle brandy

Mix flour, syrup, beans and curry powder into a model of Krakatoa Island. Pour strawberry syrup over it to simulate lava. Pour brandy over all. Strike a match. Eat while still burning.

Below, an image of Lemmy’s Krakatoa Surprise via BaraMetal:


 
With thanks to Cherry Bombed!

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Lemmy advertises Kit Kats
09.18.2013
03:40 pm

Topics:
Advertising
Food

Tags:
Lemmy Kilmister

ymmelretsimlikekoms.jpg
 
Lemmy Kilmister makes an (amusing) appearance in this British TV advert for the chocolate-covered, wafer-biscuit bar Kit Kat from 2001.

The ad features a selection of (I guess what you’d call) UK celebrities, such as former Manchester United player Roy Keane (known for being a bit of a hardman—he once deliberate broke another player’s leg) who is seen practicing his needlepoint; the late comic actor Mel Smith exercises; model/actress Kelly Brook rejects an outfit for being too revealing; some long haired fop asks to have his locks shorn; sexist comedian Bernard Manning manages to go against type by being nice; and the Daleks bring peace and love. You’ll see what Lemmy gets up to—it’s just shame he’s advertising a Nestlé product.
 

 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Lemmy Kilmister being as Lemmy as he can be, a lesson in heavy metal semiotics
04.02.2013
10:13 am

Topics:
Amusing
Music

Tags:
Lemmy Kilmister
Motörhead

Lemmy
 
Not sure if it’s the sword, the “Daisy Dukes” cut-offs, the confused nationalist iconography or his absolutely manic, speedfreak smile, but the Motörhead frontman may have actually out-Lemmy-ed himself with this one. Yep, this is Lemmy at his Lemmyest.

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The Motörizer Bunny: Lemmy celebrates Easter?
03.28.2013
12:24 pm

Topics:
Amusing

Tags:
Lemmy Kilmister
Motörhead


 
Eat the rich, save the bunnies…

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Lemmy’s pre-Motorhead hippie trip
12.14.2012
05:45 pm

Topics:
Drugs
Music

Tags:
Lemmy Kilmister
Sam Gopal


 
In 1968, tabla player Sam Gopal started a band with Lemmy Kilmister (guitar/ vocals), Roger D’Elia (guitar) and Phil Duke on bass. Together they recorded the album Escalator, which is sitar-less raga-rock with typically vague mystical lyrics and a stoned vibe. On a psychedelic scale of purple to brown, I’d rate this one maroon.

Strange to see Lemmy this mellow. Though, as you see in the following quote, Lemmy was spending a lot of time on speed. I love the fact that he keeps referring to tablas as bongos.

That was in 1968. It was very rushed, obviously. But the speed was very good in those days. I sat up all night and wrote all the fucking songs. Eleven of them, I think.

Honestly, I have never been able to get into this record, and it’s entirely due to the drumming being bongos instead of a conventional drum set. I realize that Sam Gopal is the bongo player, so the whole project is based around him, and I’m totally missing the point. But I just want to hear some real drums behind these songs, damn it!

No one will ever mistake this dreary rain-drenched b&w clip for Yellow Submarine.
 

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Mr. Pötatöhead Lemmy Kilmister
11.26.2012
12:24 pm

Topics:
Amusing
Art
Games
Music

Tags:
Lemmy Kilmister
Mr. Potato Head


 
Last week I blogged about the Dee Dee Ramone Mr. Potato Head. This week it’s a Mr. Pötatöhead Lemmy Kilmister by self-proclaimed “Potato Head Master” and artist, Jason D. Johnson.


 

 
With thanks to Cherrybombed

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Motörhead trash a hotel room


 
Lemmy and Phil “the Animal” Taylor getting up to some hotel trashing shenanigans on French TV. They also put the French journalist in a headlock towards the end.

“We are not violent!”

 

 
Via WFMU

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A needlepoint portrait of Motörhead’s Lemmy Kilmister
03.28.2012
02:02 pm

Topics:
Amusing
Art
Music

Tags:
Lemmy Kilmister
Motörhead


 
Etsy shop Defiant Damsel is selling a one of a kind 8x8 cross stitch portrait of Lemmy for just $50.00 + shipping. Maybe a nice housewarming gift?
 
Previously on Dangerous Minds:
Lemmy visits Glamor Shots
 
Via Cheryybombed

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Hawkwind: Documentary on Space Rock’s Sonic Warriors

hawkwind
 
They may have looked like the oldest hippies in town, but before Punk, Hawkwind was the unwashed boy band of counter culture. Their music - the hymn book for the disenfranchised, the geeks, the loners, the smart kids at school, who never tried to please teacher. To be a fan was like running away to some intergalactic circus. John Lydon was a fan, and the Sex Pistols regularly performed “Silver Machine” - Hawkwind’s classic Dave Brock / Robert Calvert single, with its defining vocal by Lemmy (Ian Kilmister). Like millions of others, this was the song that first introduced me to Hawkwind, when it was played under a visual cornucopia from a performance at the Dunstable Civic Hall, on Top of the Pops in 1972.

Formed in 1969, Hawkwind were a rather sweaty and masculine mix of Acid Rock (LSD was handed out at gigs) and Space Rock. They appealed to those with an interest in Jerry Cornelius, Ballard, Burroughs, Philip K Dick, Freak Brothers’ comics, black holes, Gramsci, Kropotkin, Stacia and Derek ‘n’ Clive. In sixth form at school, we discussed the merits Quark, Strangeness and Charm against Warrior on the Edge of Time; Hawklords versus Astounding Sounds, Amazing Music or Doremi Fasol Latido. Hawkwind were an albums band, unlike Punk and New Wave which then seemed defined by singles, issued as keenly as revolutionary pamphlets. There was a ritual to playing thirty-three-and-a-third, long-playing discs: opening the sleeve, reading the liner notes or lyrics, cleaning the disc and stylus, listening to all of side 1, then side 2. It was like attending mass and sharing in the holy sacrament.

Hawkwind evolved from its original line-up - Dave Brock (guitar, keyboards, vocals), Nik Turner (saxophone, flute, vocals), Huw Lloyd-Langton (guitar, vocals), John A. Harrison (bass guitar, vocals), Dik Mik (Synthesizer), Terry Ollis (drums), Mick Slattery (guitar), to include amongst others such wayward talents as poet and singer Robert Calvert (who died too soon), Lemmy, and author Michael Moorcock. Being a fan of Hawkwind was like a rites of passage, that opened doors to other equally experimental and original music.

More than forty years on, Hawkwind, under the helm of its only original member Dave Brock, is still touring the world, bringing an incredible back catalogue of music and tuning people in to a world of possibility.

Hawkwind tour the UK in December, details here.
 

 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Lemmy visits Glamor Shots
06.21.2010
05:27 pm

Topics:
Amusing
Fashion
Music

Tags:
Lemmy Kilmister
Hawkwind
Motorhead

image
 
Sometimes a picture IS worth a thousand words. This is one of them.

Via the fuck yeah tanaka Tumblr blog

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment