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‘Love Story’: Definitive doc on the great Arthur Lee and Love
03.21.2017
01:27 pm
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It seems that Love is in the air…. Just a few days ago we featured a swell duvet cover featuring the cover art of Forever Changes as the prevailing design.

Love was perfectly primed to become an object of cult adoration. They were an interracial band that was smack in the middle of a very fertile California music scene in the 1960s. The quality of their output was very high, and reflected a very important transition in the maturation of the rock scene as a whole. Love’s “classic” line-up didn’t last long. They were a hard-luck band with more than its share of uncommonly punitive arrests and premature deaths. On top of all that, Love did produce the one clear masterpiece, the aforementioned Forever Changes that is today widely regarded to be one of the greatest albums ever recorded.
 

 
The documentary Love Story was released just after frontman Arthur Lee’s death from leukemia in 2006. While it is properly adulatory, directors Chris Hall and Mike Kerry largely manage to keep the distorting effect of sadness and grief out of it, presumably because much of the footage was filmed before the deaths of Lee as well as the (unrelated) 1998 deaths of Ken Forssi and Bryan Maclean.

Feel the Love after the jump…

READ ON
Posted by Martin Schneider
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03.21.2017
01:27 pm
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Love’s iconic ‘Forever Changes’ album art as a duvet cover
03.15.2017
02:43 pm
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This is one of those things I found by accident looking for something else. I don’t exactly know how or why it came into my view. But here it is.

If you’re a superfan of Love’s iconic Forever Changes album, might I tempt you with this awesome duvet cover? I know it’s kind of strange to see it as a duvet cover, but I totally dig it.

The duvet is available through Rebubble. It comes in three different sizes ranging from twin to king. Depending on what size you choose, the price does change.

The material is a brushed polyester printed topside with a soft cotton/polyester off-white underside. Instead of buttons on the duvet cover, it has a concealed zipper. It’s also machine washable.

It’s definitely a conversation piece and as The Dude would say, “That duvet really tied the room together, did it not?”


 

Previously on Dangerous Minds:
Jimi Hendrix’s mescaline-fueled session with Arthur Lee and Love
Love songs: Arthur Lee and Love in electrifying, seldom-seen 1970 live footage

Posted by Tara McGinley
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03.15.2017
02:43 pm
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Love songs: Happy birthday Arthur Lee
03.07.2017
03:00 pm
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As anyone lucky enough to have seen the late Arthur Lee—born on this day in 1945—in performance can tell you, it was a very special experience. I saw Arthur perform three times myself, including an early 90s gig at the fabled Palamino Club in North Hollywood with Baby Lemonade where the electricity went out and he did a candle-lit “unplugged” set without the group. Pure magic. The entire audience was grinning from ear to ear.

The second time I saw Arthur Lee play was even more memorable. After spending 5-1/2 years in a California Federal prison, Arthur was released and in 2003 he began a tentative series of performances around Los Angeles playing Love’s classic 1967 album Forever Changes in its entirety.

When he walked onstage the night I saw him, at a packed Henry Fonda Theatre, he looked tiny, frail, old, and just plain scared. His clothes looked too big. Everyone was pulling for him, we all wanted this to be amazing and triumphant, but frankly it didn’t look promising. Within seconds, however, he strapped on his hollow body electric guitar, smiled broadly and became the great Arthur Lee before our very eyes. It was a magical musical event. Lee’s voice had lost none of its beauty and range; the songs none of their power. Audience members were moved to tears. It felt like a holy moment, it really did. (Of the third time, a tragically ill-fated show at UCLA in front of an audience that included some major celebrities and rock stars, the less said the better.)
 

 
But sadly, as Arthur Lee and Love fans well know, there is almost no footage—as in nearly none—of the original, classic Love line-up performing. There’s an American Bandstand appearance from 1966 with lip-syncs of “My Little Red Book” and “Message to Pretty” but most television outlets had no use for a multi-racial rock group at the time. As with the Velvet Underground, Lee and Love’s most vital and creative years were almost completely undocumented on film and video. They just slipped through the cracks.

The Four Sale-era incarnation of Love with Gary Rowles, Frank Fayad and George Suranovich was shot live in Denmark in 1970. Not the same musicians, save for Lee, who recorded the classic Forever Changes album, but who’s going to complain about vintage live film footage of Arthur fucking Lee? This was aired as A Group By The Name Of Love in July of 1970. The concert footage is from a show at Tivoli Koncertsal, Copenhagen, on March 12, 1970.
 

A brief interview with Arthur followed by an energetic “Love is More than Words”
 
Much more after the jump…

READ ON
Posted by Richard Metzger
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03.07.2017
03:00 pm
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Love songs: Arthur Lee and Love in electrifying, seldom-seen 1970 live footage
04.20.2016
01:24 pm
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As anyone lucky enough to have seen the late, great Arthur Lee in performance can tell you, it was a very special experience. I saw Arthur perform three times myself, including an early 90s gig at a biker bar in North Hollywood with Baby Lemonade where the electricity went out and he did a candle-lit “unplugged” set without the group. Pure magic. The entire audience was grinning from ear to ear.

The second time I saw Arthur Lee play was even more memorable. After spending 5-1/2 years in a California Federal prison, Arthur was released and in 2003 he began a tentative series of performances around Los Angeles playing Love’s classic 1967 album Forever Changes in its entirety.

When he walked onstage the night I saw him, at a packed Henry Fonda Theatre, he looked tiny, frail, old, and just scared. His clothes looked too big. Everyone was pulling for him, we all wanted this to be amazing and triumphant, but frankly it didn’t look promising. Within seconds, however, he strapped on his hollow body electric guitar, smiled broadly and became the great Arthur Lee before our very eyes. It was a magical musical event. Lee’s voice had lost none of its beauty and range; the songs none of their power. Audience members were moved to tears. It felt like a holy moment, it really did. (Of the third time, a tragically ill-fated show at UCLA in front of an audience that included some major celebrities and rock stars, the less said the better.)

But sadly, as Arthur Lee and Love fans know, there is almost no footage—as in nearly none—of the original, classic Love line-up performing. There’s an American Bandstand appearance from 1966 with a lip-sync of “My Little Red Book” and “Message to Pretty” but most television outlets had no use for a multi-racial rock group at the time. As with the Velvet Underground, Lee and Love’s most vital and creative years were almost completely undocumented on film and video. Somehow they just slipped through the cracks.

The Four Sale-era incarnation of Love with Gary Rowles, Frank Fayad and George Suranovich was shot live in Denmark in 1970. Not the same musicians, save for Lee, who recorded the classic Forever Changes album, but who’s going to complain about vintage live film footage of Arthur fucking Lee? This was aired as A Group By The Name Of Love in July of 1970. The concert footage is from a show at Tivoli Koncertsal, Copenhagen, on March 12, 1970.

A brief interview with Arthur followed by an energetic “Love is More than Words”

 
More Love after the jump…

READ ON
Posted by Richard Metzger
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04.20.2016
01:24 pm
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Love’s final album to be reissued; listen to the unreleased track ‘Graveyard Hop’ exclusively on DM
10.22.2015
09:32 am
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That Arthur Lee entered such a long creative and personal wilderness phase after the ‘60s maybe shouldn’t be such a surprise. His first significant release, the self-titled debut album by his band Love, was one of the greatest rock albums of all time, and he followed that with the poor-selling-but-influential experiment Da Capo and the immortal psych-rock landmark Forever Changes, the album someone has if they only have one Love album. After that triumphant beginning, the band dissolved in the familiar ‘60s miasma of dope, money issues, and personal tensions, but Lee, perhaps unwisely, kept the name alive with new lineups. Without guitarist Bryan MacLean, it was never the same—the contractual obligation album Four Sail remains justly well-regarded, and Out Here, culled from the same sessions and released within months of Four Sail, is also worth a spin, but Forever Changes was a hard act to follow, and subsequent Love and Arthur Lee solo albums are generally considered marginal.
 

 
In particular, the final non-archival LP to bear the Love imprimatur, 1974’s Reel to Real, has gone so neglected that its first pressing was its ONLY pressing. Usually, when an album dies like that, it either becomes a “lost classic” or it’s the sign of an unlistenable dog of a record. But in this case, the lack of a reissue is kind of understandable—there’s nothing about the album that even remotely resembles the music of Love’s enduring reputation. That doesn’t make it a bad album on its own terms, though, and the reissue label High Moon—previously responsible for exhuming Love’s actual lost album Black Beauty—is giving Reel to Real a second airing, 41 years after its release and disappearance.

I had to request a copy to listen to—I wasn’t merely unfamiliar with much of the music on the album, I was at most only vaguely aware that it existed, and I’m not even sure I’ve ever beheld a physical copy. This album wasn’t just lost to the years, it was pretty much goddamn buried under them. But it’s neither an unheralded gem nor a total dud—it’s half of an excellent soul album, with some badass horns and some outstanding vocal performances by Lee. Just one example should suffice—check out “Who Are You,” and see how it compares to “Alone Again Or.”
 

 
See? Pretty much all of side one is of that caliber, so it’s almost frustrating that Lee felt like it was a good idea to call this a Love album. Had it been a solo album, perhaps it might have stood a chance at a life of its own, without Forever Changes casting a shadow over its reputation?

Things take an unfortunate downward turn on side two—there’s still some worthy stuff there, in particular a reverent and satisfying cover of William DeVaughn’s signature tune “Be Thankful for What You’ve Got,” but that side also revisits material from Four Sail and Lee’s solo debut Vindicator, in inferior versions that prompt wonder at why he bothered. But like any reissue worth discussing, Reel to Real is loaded with unreleased outtakes, alternate versions, and rehearsal recordings, including a stripped-down take of the non-LP Forever Changes era favorite “Wonder People (I Do Wonder),” a hornless version of “Stop the Music” with a more relaxed vocal take, and the straight-up oddity “Graveyard Hop,” a downright feral travesty of “Jailhouse Rock,” wherein Lee channels the howls of Little Richard. It’s never been released before, and DM is glad to be able to debut it for you today.
 

Posted by Ron Kretsch
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10.22.2015
09:32 am
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Jimi Hendrix’s mescaline-fueled session with Arthur Lee and Love
04.03.2015
07:49 am
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Arthur Lee and Jimi Hendrix, 1969
 
Jimi Hendrix and Arthur Lee met in 1964 or 1965 at Gold Star Studios in Los Angeles, where singer Rosa Lee Brooks was recording Lee’s song “My Diary.” Lee claimed the session was Hendrix’s first time in a recording studio, though it seems likely Hendrix had already cut “Testify” with the Isley Brothers.
 

 
The two men remained friends, and on St. Patrick’s Day 1970, after Love finished a European tour, Hendrix joined the band in London’s Olympic Studios. There, Lee says Jimi and the band all ate mescaline (or “Huxley’s hooch,” as we used to call it in the San Fernando Valley). From Forever Changes: Arthur Lee and the Book Of Love—The Authorized Biography of Arthur Lee, here are Lee’s recollections of the Olympic session:

Boy, did we have fun at the Olympic recording studio. The band and Jimi all took mescaline. Although they didn’t know it, I was as straight as Cochise’s arrow. Somebody had to steer the ship. [...]

One of the ways I got Jimi to do the session in the first place—or how I got his attention, anyway—happened one night at the Speakeasy. He and I arrived together. The guy at the front door told me I could come in but Jimi couldn’t. When I asked him why, he said that Jimi had been fighting in the club on an earlier occasion and they didn’t want that happening again. So I told him that Jimi was cool, the entourage that was with us was cool, and I didn’t think any fighting would be going on that night. He finally agreed. I said to Jimi, “Look, man, neither one of us is going to be around much longer, anyway; so while we’re here, we might as well do something together.” When I said that, whatever we were talking about, or he was thinking about, just seemed to stop and I had his full attention. He really went into some deep thought as he looked at me from across the table. He was looking into my eyes and I knew he could only be thinking about our early deaths.

The session went completely differently from the way I was used to recording. I thought it was to be a private session. I don’t remember telling anyone to come, except the band; but, to my surprise, there were people all over the place. There were girls I’d never seen before and faces popping out from where you would least expect a person to be. I was in a state of shock, but Jimi said, “It’s OK, let them stay.” More than once, Jimi thought we were done and went to pack everything up. Then he would come back into the studio while we were playing and say, “What key?” Once, when we were learning a song I wrote, called “Ride That Vibration,” Jimi came walking back in during the middle of it. He asked me, “What did you just say in that song?” I said, “Ride the vibration down like a six foot grave / Don’t let it get you down.” Then he said, “I gotta go; it’s getting too heavy.” He called a cab, took [drummer George Suranovich’s] girlfriend, and was out the door. George just looked at me as if to say, “That’s Jimi.” After a while, Jimi came back and suggested that everyone jam, and were my band members ever happy!

On that session in London, we managed to lay down a few tracks, among them “E-Z Rider,” “The Everlasting First,” and a jam that I would later add lyrics to. Jimi sang on “E-Z Rider.” I gave the master reel to [Blue Thumb Records president] Bob Krasnow. He never gave it back. At the time, I wondered if someone was filming us, although I never saw a camera. I found out, in the early 90s, they had been.

Back in the studio, it was almost daylight, so I signaled to H to start wrapping it up. I don’t think Jimi was ready to quit, but it had been a long night for me. The tour we were doing was over with; I just wanted to get back to Studio City in California. As we were walking out of the building, Jimi asked, “Where are you going?” I said, “Man, I gotta get back to LA; to my woman, dogs, and pigeons.” Jimi said, “Come here, I want to show you something.” We walked back inside the studio. He pointed to his guitar case on the floor. Then he opened it up. I thought he had a stash in there, but as he stood up, he pointed to it again and said, “This is all I have.” I couldn’t figure it out at first, but then it hit me. He was telling me that the white Stratocaster guitar in the case were his only possessions. I felt kind of sad for him.

 

 
Of the three songs Hendrix cut with Love at Olympic, only “The Everlasting First”—the single from Love’s False Start album—was officially released. The other two songs, Hendrix’s “Ezy Rider” and the jam “Loon,” surfaced on an acetate that turned up on eBay in 2009.

The music, after the jump…

READ ON
Posted by Oliver Hall
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04.03.2015
07:49 am
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The Melvins/Love mashup shirt you didn’t know you wanted has arrived
09.08.2014
12:08 pm
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Artist/musician Brian Walsby has been active for a solid 30 years, making art for Maximum Rock ‘N Roll and Flipside, and drumming for bands as varied as SoCal hardcore shit-stirrers Scared Straight and math-rock gurus Polvo. His latest opus is a hilarious Melvins shirt that parodies the famous cover art of Forever Changes, the classic third LP by Love.
 

 
The shirt features six members of the Melvins’ forever-changing (GET IT? GET IT?) lineup, including Jeff Pinkus (Butthole Surfers), Trevor Dunn (Mr. Bungle, Tomahawk), Jared Warren (Big Business, Karp), Coady Willis (Big Business, Murder City Devils) and, obviously, ur-Melvins Buzz Osborne and Dale Crover. These will be limited in quantity to 500, and per the Melvins’ Facebook page, they’re already running low, so pre-ordering soon would seem wise if you’re just dying for one of these.

The Melvins’ new LP, Hold It in, features Jeff Pinkus and Paul Leary of the Butthole Surfers, and is due out in October. While you wait, enjoy the Osborne / Crover / Willis / Warren lineup’s live performance at L.A.‘s Amoeba Records in 2008.
 

Posted by Ron Kretsch
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09.08.2014
12:08 pm
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Arthur Lee and Love performing ‘Signed D.C.’ live in 1970
10.03.2011
07:29 pm
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The immortal Arthur Lee and Love performing “Signed D.C.” on Danish TV special A Group By The Name Of Love that aired in July of 1970.

The concert footage is from a Love gig at Tivoli Koncertsal, Copenhagen, March 12, 1970.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell
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10.03.2011
07:29 pm
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Virginia is for lovers?
06.09.2011
06:46 pm
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I think someone lost their job over this one…

Click here for larger image.

(via reddit)

Posted by Tara McGinley
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06.09.2011
06:46 pm
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Arthur Lee’s 1973 album ‘Black Beauty’ is finally being released
03.03.2011
08:00 pm
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Love, the 1973 incarnation.
 
Arthur Lee’s lost album Black Beauty is finally receiving an official release after nearly 40 years of being in bootleg limbo. Newly launched label High Moon Records is releasing it on June 7.

Originally planned to be released by Buffalo Records in 1973, Black Beauty was shelved when the label went bankrupt. It was recorded by one of Lee’s various incarnations of his band Love: Robert Rozelle, Bass Guitar ~ Joe Blocker, Drums ~ Melvan Whittington, Lead Guitar.

High Moon founder George Wallace stated in a press release that Black Beauty is “that rarest of rock artifacts: a never-before-released, full-length studio album, from an undisputed musical genius.”

You can listen to tracks from Black Beauty here.

Fan made video of the song “Midnight Sun” from Black Beauty:

 
Via The Daily Swarm

Posted by Marc Campbell
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03.03.2011
08:00 pm
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Promo video for Love’s ‘Your Mind And We Belong Together’
01.07.2011
07:48 pm
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Love’s 1968 single “Your Mind And We Belong Together” was Arthur Lee’s first solo outing as a producer and the last record to feature all of the band’s original members. This promo clip was directed by Mark Abramson who co-produced Love’s debut album.

For you Love fans out there, I recommend a recent biography of Arthur Lee, “Forever Changes, Arthur Lee And The Book Of Love,” by John Einarson. It includes long passages from Lee’s heretofore unpublished memoirs. For that reason alone, it’s invaluable. His recollections of working with Jimi Hendrix and encounters with The Doors are rock history from the inside. You can pick up a copy here.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell
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01.07.2011
07:48 pm
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Fela Kuti and Love cakes
07.20.2010
11:44 pm
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Love ‘Forever Changes’ lemon buttermilk custard cake
 
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Chocolate cake with vanilla butter. Chocolate image from the back of the Shakara LP
 
Holy awesomeness of cakes! These friggin’ amazing cakes are made by Los Angeles resident straightouttachocolate. I highly suggest visiting her Flickr page to view more unique and tasty treats.

straightouttachocolate

Thanks a-rock!

Posted by Tara McGinley
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07.20.2010
11:44 pm
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