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Here’s that Minor Threat/Black Sabbath mashup t-shirt you didn’t know you totally wanted
08.10.2015
10:20 am
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The photograph on this T-shirt captures the members of Black Sabbath in their hometown of Washington, D.C., on a sunny spring day in 1983, shortly after recording their only studio album Out of Step, which represented a galvanizing call to arms for a generation of disaffected youth eager to express…... 

No. Try again.

The photograph on this clever T-shirt, put out by Wear Dinner, is an adaptation of one of the many iconic pictures taken by Glen E. Friedman. The photograph, for which Friedman used a fisheye lens, was taken in the summer of 1983, just a few months before Minor Threat broke up. (If you’d like to learn more about that picture, I recommend picking up Friedman’s 2014 book My Rules.)

To get the shirt, you’ll have to fork over $25, or you can get a coffee mug for $12.

Unaccountably, I couldn’t find any clips of Minor Threat or Fugazi playing Sabbath covers (weird!) so here are these two extended videos instead.

Sabbath, Paris, 1970 and Minor Threat, CBGB’s, 1982.
 

 

 

Posted by Martin Schneider
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08.10.2015
10:20 am
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Minor Threat’s iconic ‘Out of Step’ LP cover
07.13.2015
11:55 am
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“I can’t keep up! I can’t keep up! Out of step with the world!”
 
Minor Threat’s 1983 LP Out of Step is arguably one of the ten most important American hardcore albums, both in terms of its musical power and overall lasting influence. For ‘80s punk kids it was one of those “gateway” records, much like Black Flag’s Damaged or Dead Kennedys’ Fresh Fruit For Rotting Vegetables—ubiquitous, readily available at any mall in any podunk town, anywhere across the USA. Camelot Records might only have had twenty titles in their “punk” section, but Out of Step was one of ‘em.

The producers of the excellent documentary on the DC hardcore scene, Salad Days: A Decade Of Punk In Washington, DC (which is currently available for pre-order)  maintain a Facebook page which routinely shares articles and factoids about Minor Threat and their contemporaries. This page recently reported that the band’s original intention was to have the Out of Step cover art illustrated by famed punk artist Brian “Pushead” Schroeder, but at the last minute the band decided to go in a different direction, enlisting the help of friend and art school student Cynthia Connolly
 

 
Connolly’s iconic design of the crude black sheep leaping away from a pack of finely watercolor-rendered white sheep, besides being a spot-on symbol for youthful rebellion, is as masterful a work of “branding” as the instantly recognizable DK logo or Black Flag bars. The meaning instantly connects, while being tonally subtle—in stark contrast to the majority of early ‘80s “brutal” punk sleeve art. The child-like rendering of that libertine lamb says more than a thousand radioactive skulls ever could.
 

DC artist and photographer, Cynthia Connolly—taken from her book, Banned in DC.
 
Connolly, who also faithfully documented the ‘80s DC scene, is responsible for the essential book Banned in DC, which is available through Dischord Records. Dangerous Minds had the opportunity to speak with Connolly about the sheep, “Mr. Sheepy” as she calls him, and what it symbolizes.

Dangerous Minds: What can you tell us about the design of the Out of Step cover?

Cynthia Connolly: Minor Threat had asked me to make a drawing for the Out of Step cover. Ian Mackaye and I discussed something to do with a black sheep. The obvious idea was a black sheep that was leaping away from all the white sheep. The black sheep symbolized all of us, the kids that were doing something different, going against the grain of what was going on at the time.  I thought of us as young and energetic. I was just 19 when I drew the sheep, I think. I was young and energetic! It was 1983. 

Anyway, the white sheep were illustrated in water color with fine lines. They were elegant and sophisticated, but looked like they were bored, and perhaps even happy about being bored. The black sheep, on the other hand, had his eyes open—an important detail some people miss when getting it as a tattoo!—and is leaping from the drab sophisticated crowd. He’s making a choice on being different and is happy about it. The crayon, of course, is a symbol of youth and innocence. One thing I didn’t do is that I colored the sheep in like an adult… not as like a child (in circles… adults would fill in the shape from left to right).

The funny thing is, that drawing was a one shot deal. I just did one drawing. Showed it to them and was done. I did practice the black sheep a couple times on another paper, but once I got it down, just drew it on the watercolor of the white sheep and I was done! So punk! I call him “Mr. Sheepy” now, when people ask about him.
 

Ian MacKaye displays sheep sketches. Photo by Peter Beste.
 
It’s noteworthy how “gentle” the image is—in contrast to typically dark or aggressive “punk art” of the time.

Exactly. He’s NOT angry—as so much punk depicts—he’s merely making a choice to be different and has no qualms about it. He is intentionally jumping away. I love what he symbolizes and is still a guiding light in ways for myself. In the end, it’s about not having the fear of following your passion, being creative, and stepping out to support your ideas and the ideas of your friends.
 

Connolly, pictured here with a dress made from the same silk screen that was used to create the “Out of Step” test press covers. “We threw the dress into the mix. It’s like a punk poodle skirt!” Photo by Jim Saah.
 
Continues after the jump…

READ ON
Posted by Christopher Bickel
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07.13.2015
11:55 am
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Elvis Presley, Perry Como… Minor Threat? Granny panties, now for hipsters!
06.15.2015
08:10 am
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According to the Internet, 2015 is the year granny panties come back into style.

Whether this is a result of a healthier body-positive society or simply hipster “normcore” irony infiltrating the undergarment market, it’s certainly a clear-cut case of “everything old is new again.”

Here’s a trend we’d really love to see come back: granny panties embroidered with little 45 rpm records—you buy six of them and get a free single!
 

The music fan in this photo may want to consider using a pair over her greasy mitts, as her record handling skills leave something to be desired.
 
The 1958 Sears catalog ad features an unbeatable deal: You buy six adorable pairs of embroidered panties, and you get a free record of your choice: Elvis Presley, Eddie Fisher, or Perry Como!
 

Now, we’re not sure how many underthings Eddie Fisher or Perry Como were moving, but we’re pretty sure Elvis was causing lots and lots of panties to need replacing back in ‘58.
 
Fast-forward to 2015’s granny panty offerings after the jump…

READ ON
Posted by Christopher Bickel
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06.15.2015
08:10 am
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A 7-year-old’s drawings of classic rap albums


 
Via the fantastic So Bad So Good blog comes word of the talented lad Yung Lenox, who at age 7 is filling his Instagram account with his own re-creations of classic hip hop album art, with some punk and metal in the mix as well. Now, I’ve never known a kid who didn’t love to draw, but this kid shows some promise a bit beyond his years. He’s also admirably prolific, and enterprising to boot—he has an online store where he’s selling prints of his work. There’s little else I could add but to question whether he’s even allowed to listen to any of these, but since that does little to illuminate the actual work, let’s just have a look at the images.
 

Raekwon, Only Built 4 Cuban Linx
 

Ice Cube, Amerikkkas Most Wanted
 

Dr. Octagon, Dr Octagonecologyst
 

2Pac, All Eyez on Me
 

A Tribe Called Quest, The Low End Theory
 

Slayer, Live: Decade of Aggression
 

Minor Threat, Minor Threat
 

2 Live Crew, As Nasty As They Wanna Be

Posted by Ron Kretsch
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02.06.2014
09:12 am
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Henry Rollins working at Häagen-Dazs, 1981
10.11.2013
03:35 pm
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Fun photos of Henry Rollins (and Ian MacKaye) back when he worked at a Häagen-Dazs, circa 1981.

Apparently Henry was a model employee at his Washington D.C. area Häagen-Dazs franchise. He was promoted to assistant manager!

More images available like this in the book Punk Love by Susie J. Horgan.

Previously on Dangerous Minds:

Listen to Henry Rollins and Ian MacKaye’s 2-hour DJ set on KCRW
 

 

 

 

Via BuzzFeed

Posted by Tara McGinley
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10.11.2013
03:35 pm
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This is Hardcore: Minor Threat live at CBGB, 1982
08.30.2013
09:55 am
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Minor Threat flyer
 
While this video is as muddy as shit—after all, nobody had an iPhone yet—it’s still a fascinating document of the seminal DC hardcore band gigging in the NYC’s ultimate punk rock venue. And it sounds better than it looks, anyway.

As he introduces a cover of Wire’s “12XU,” Ian MacKaye says something about the carburetor making them three hours late. The other bands on the bill were The Mob and Urban Waste, NYC bands both—notice that the flier advertises Minor Threat as being “FROM DC.” According to Steven Blush’s American Hardcore: A Tribal History, this gig was the last one Urban Waste would ever play. A year later, Minor Threat too would be no more.

Conceptual artist/writer Dan Graham made a documentary about Minor Threat and their fans in 1983. In the book Dan Graham: Rock My Religion,  cultural theorist Kodwo Eshun references a video of this show taken by Graham; this is presumably that video.

Setlist:
Steppin’ Stone (Monkees cover)
Filler
Straight Edge
Betray
Small Man, Big Mouth
Seeing Red
Minor Threat
Guilty of Being White
12XU (Wire cover)
Screaming At a Wall
It Follows
Out of Step (With the World)
I Don’t Wanna Hear It
Little Friend
No Reason
Bottled Violence
Think Again
In My Eyes
 

Previously on Dangerous Minds:
Minor Threat t-shirts sold at Urban Outfitters now
Ice cream-eating motherf*cker: Minor Threat Ice Cream Truck

Posted by Martin Schneider
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08.30.2013
09:55 am
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Minor Threat t-shirts sold at Urban Outfitters now
08.01.2013
11:54 am
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Nothing is sacred anymore… nothing. Urban Outfitters is now selling Minor Threat t-shirts for a mere $28.00! What’s next? The Nation of Ulysses hoodie?

According to Washington City Paper even though Dischord doesn’t make t-shirts, Minor Threat is a different story because of all the gazillion bootlegs out there. Ian MacKaye and Co. hired a company based out of California to “oversee their official shirts, and when a bootleg crops up, let them deal with it.”

“It’s not a political thing for me,” MacKaye says. “I just don’t give a fuck about T-shirts.” At some point, the former Minor Threat frontman said to the band, “This is crazy. I spend so much of my time” chasing down bootleggers. He found that when he contacted the responsible parties about their bootlegs, they just gave him hell. “They get in your face… or they deny it,” he says. “It’s a complete waste of time.”

Just because the shirt is licensed doesn’t mean MacKaye approves of the sweatshoppy clothing chain selling his band’s shirts, though. “Do I think it’s absurd? Yes, I certainly do,” he says. He also thinks the asking price is ridiculous, but he’s more or less resigned to it. “Motherfuckers pay $28, that’s what they wanna pay for their shirts.”

He compares the pricey T-shirts to people happily blowing their money on expensive shoes. Why do they do it? “I guess it makes their feet feel fuckin’ rich,” he says.

And there you have it. You’ll be seeing a lot of youngins around town sportin’ a t-shirt of a band they probably don’t even know who the fuck they were. Or even if it was a band at all.

Below, Minor Threat live at 9:30 Club, June 23, 1983:

 
Via Washington City Paper and h/t Jeff Albers

Posted by Tara McGinley
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08.01.2013
11:54 am
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Ice cream-eating motherf*cker: Minor Threat Ice Cream Truck
07.17.2012
02:38 pm
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image
 
Yeah, it’s a photoshop job by Brian Miller, but still…someone’s gotta make this happen, amirite?!

Washington City Paper writes:

Guy Picciotto’s ice cream-eating motherfucker screed, immortalized in the Fugazi documentary Instrument, gets trucked.

And yes, Miller knows Picciotto wasn’t in Minor Threat, he just “couldn’t resist the pun.”

Thanks, Jeff Albers!

Posted by Tara McGinley
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07.17.2012
02:38 pm
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Happy Birthday: Ian MacKaye turns 50 today
04.16.2012
04:41 pm
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image
Ian MacKaye at the 9:30 Club in Washington DC, 1983
 
Frontman for Minor Threat, The Teen Idles, Embrace, Fugazi and co-founder of Dischord Records, Ian MacKaye turns 50 years old today! So here’s a BIG happy birthday to you, Mr. MacKaye!

Below, Fugazi perform “Bad Mouth” live in 1991 at the Sacred Heart Church in Washington, DC.

 
Ian Svenonius of Nation of Ulysses, The Make-Up and Weird War interviews Ian MacKaye for Soft Focus:

 
After the jump, Fugazi documentary Instrument in its entirety…

READ ON
Posted by Tara McGinley
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04.16.2012
04:41 pm
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A riot of their own: Fear blow up late night TV

image
 
John Belushi left Saturday Night Live in 1979 but agreed to appear on the show on Halloween of 1981 if one of his favorite bands, Fear, was hired as the musical guest. SNL, which was in a ratings slump, didn’t hesitate to agree to Belushi’s terms. Fear got the gig.

In order to create some excitement during Fear’s upcoming performance, Belushi contacted Ian Mackaye, who was fronting Washington D.C.‘s Minor Threat at the time.

“This is John Belushi. I’m a big fan of Fear’s. I made a deal with Saturday Night Live that I would make a cameo appearance on the show if they’d let Fear play. I got your number from Penelope Spheeris, who did Decline of Western Civilization and she said that you guys, Washington DC punk rock kids, know how to dance. I want to get you guys to come up to the show.”

Mackaye agreed to pull together some of his friends to go to New York. Little did he know that he would be in the center of one of television’s great rock and roll moments.

In an interview with Nardwuar, Mackaye describes what happened:

It was worked out that we could all arrive at the Rockefeller Center where Saturday Night Live was being filmed. The password to get in was “Ian MacKaye.” We went up the day before. The Misfits played with The Necros at the Ukrainian hall, I think, so all of the Detroit people were there, like Tesco Vee and Cory Rusk from the Necros and all the Touch and Go people and a bunch of DC people – 15 to 20 of us came up from DC. Henry (Rollins) was gone. He was living in LA at this point. So we went to the show. During the dress rehearsal, a camera got knocked over. We were dancing and they were very angry with us and said that they were going to not let us do it then Belushi really put his foot down and insisted on it. So, during the actual set itself, they let us come out again.

During the show – before they go to commercial, they always go to this jack-o-lantern. This carved pumpkin. If you watched it during the song, you’ll see one of our guys, this guy named Bill MacKenzie, coming out holding the pumpkin above his head because he’s just getting ready to smash it. And that’s when they cut it off. They kicked us out and locked us out for two hours. We were locked in a room because they were so angry with us about the behavior. I didn’t think it was that big of deal.

They said they were going to sue us and have us arrested for damages. There was so much hype about that. The New York Post reported half a million dollars worth of damages. It was nothing. It was a plastic clip that got broken. It was a very interesting experience and I realized how completely unnatural it is for a band to be on a television show – particularly a punk band – that kind of has a momentum to suddenly be expected to immediately jump into a song in that type of setting. It was very weird. Largely unpleasant. Made me realize that’s not something I’m interested in doing.”

Belushi was also among the moshers.

Fear’s SNL debut cost them future gigs with the show, clubs wouldn’t book them, and reputedly an offer from Belushi for the band to do the soundtrack of his next movie Neighbors was rescinded by the studio producing the film after Belushi’s death. All for the love of rock and roll.

“It’s great to be here in New Jersey!”
 

Posted by Marc Campbell
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12.10.2011
04:59 pm
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Download 911 American Hardcore Tracks From 1981-1986 For Free

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Steven Blush, author of American Hardcore: A Tribal History, has uploaded 911 hardcore tracks of his favorite bands for free.  Some of the artists include: Flipper, Minor Threat, Bad Brains, Minutemen, Hüsker Dü, Dicks, Butthole Surfers, Cro-Mags and more!

Travel on over to 24 Hours of Hardcore compiled by Steven Blush and download the goodness while it lasts. 

Side note from Steven: “COPYRIGHT HOLDERS: I will delete your tracks at your request.

(via Das Kraftfuttermischwerk)

 

Posted by Tara McGinley
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12.02.2010
12:18 pm
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