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Unplugged: Controversial Xmas ‘Tree’ sculpture deflated by vandals
10.18.2014
07:05 am

Topics:
Activism
Amusing
Art

Tags:
Paul McCarthy
Christmas tree
Tree

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This morning Parisians awoke to find Paul McCarthy’s controversial sculpture “Tree” looking like a discarded giant prophylactic after it was deflated by vandals at the Place Vendôme, Paris, during the night.

Since its installation the art work has divided opinion with many Parisians outraged by the 80 foot sculpture’s similarity to an… er… adult novelty item. Well, it now turns out that “Tree” was indeed inspired by that very item as artist McCarthy told Le Monde newspaper that “It all started as a joke.”

“...I realised it resembled a Christmas tree, but it is an abstract work. People can be offended if they want to think of it as a plug, but for me it is more of an abstraction.”

The “abstraction” was lost on some Parisians with one irate passerby slapping the 69-year-old artist in the face and shouting:

“You’re not French and this has no place in the square.”

McCarthy was allegedly dazed but unhurt by the assault and asked:

“Does this sort of thing happen often in Paris?”

The sculpture was specially created by the artist for Paris’s International Contemporary Art Fair (FIAC) that is being held in the city between 23rd-26th October. McCarthy’s previous work includes an enormous Santa Claus with what some critics claim is an unfeasibly large implement in his hand and a sculpture of former US President George W Bush getting intimate with pigs.

In the early hours of Saturday morning, vandals climbed the metal fence surrounding the giant sculpture before cutting the power supply that pumped air into the inflatable and slashing the tether that kept it upright.

According to the Daily Telegraph, McCarthy said he did not want the sculpture re-inflated or repaired. However, the paper also reported that organisers at FIAC said the sculpture would be “re-installed” as soon as possible. Now, that sounds painful…
 

 
Via the Daily Telegraph

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
‘All life is a blur of Republicans and meat!’: Zippy the Pinhead… live?
10.17.2014
03:25 pm

Topics:
Pop Culture

Tags:
comics
Zippy the Pinhead


 
One of the more improbably durable comics in American popular culture is Zippy, the adventures of “Zippy the Pinhead,” Bill Griffith’s non sequitur-spouting polkadot muumuu-wearing Ding Dong and taco sauce-obsessed pinhead everyman. Because so many readers are totally baffled by it, there is a primer for “Understanding Zippy in Six Easy Lessons” on the Zippy website. Robert Crumb called Zippy “by far the very best daily comic strip that exists in America.”

Zippy was born in 1971 when Roger Brand, an underground/mainstream comics writer-editor-illustrator asked Griffith to “Maybe do some kind of love story, but with really weird people” for Real Pulp Comics #1. The name comes from P. T. Barnum’s famous sideshow performer Zip the Pinhead (who probably wasn’t an actual microcephalic) but the character’s features and clothing are patterned after Schlitzie from Tod Browning’s Freaks.

After Griffith launched Zippy in The Berkeley Barb in 1976, his character went on to a daily strip in 1986 and a Sunday funnies version debuted in 1990. The comic is distributed by King Features Syndicate.
 

 
In 1980, Griffith wrote the scripts for a handful of live-action Zippy shorts that were (I think) produced and directed for San Francisco cable access by Erik Nelson and his Videowest production company. Here are some of my favorites (all are on YouTube if you search for “Videowest” and “Zippy”). It’s worth noting that the reporter we see in a few of these pieces is a fellow named Tony Russomanno, then of KSFO Radio in San Francisco, who was the sole radio reporter to cover the mass suicides at the Peoples Temple in Jonestown, Guyana.

Zippy is played by Jim Turner of NPR’s Duck’s Breath Mystery Theatre comedy troupe. Turner would go on to play MTV’s presidential candidate “Randee of the Redwoods” and you might also recognize him from HBO’s Arli$$ series where he played a sports agent.

The theme music is “Laughing Blues” by The Bonzo Dog Band.

“Zippy Stories—Take 1”
 
More live action Zippy after the jump…

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Ugly Xmas sweaters inspired by ‘Gremlins’ and ‘Fargo’
10.17.2014
12:17 pm

Topics:
Amusing
Movies

Tags:
Christmas

Gremlins Christmas sweater by Mondo
 
The mad minds over at Mondo have really outdone themselves when it comes to the world of knitwear. In May they released “The MONDO 237 Collection” a selection of wearables and home decor that homaged The Shining.

Now that sweater weather has arrived again, Mondo has put out two new items; a sweater tribute to the 1984 film Gremlins and the 1996’s Fargo. Both will make great gifts for your nerdy sister or easily help you win you any ugly sweater contest in Anytown, USA. Each sweater retails for $85 bucks and pre-orders are going on now over at Mondo’s merch shop.
 
Gremlins Christmas sweater (back view) by Mondo
Gremlins sweater (back view)
 
Fargo Christmas sweater by Mondo
 
Fargo Christmas sweater (back view) by Mondo
Fargo sweater (back view)

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
Nothing lost in translation: The ‘acute malevolence’ of Morrissey
10.17.2014
10:47 am

Topics:
Activism
Amusing
Heroes

Tags:
Morrissey

Morrissey hugs a cat
 
In an interview earlier this month with El País, the largest newspaper in circulation in Spain, Morrissey unleashed his thoughts on bullfighting, his musical peers, his tenth studio record World Peace is None of Your Business, and compared the British royal family to the brood of Syrian President, Bashar Hafez al-Assad. In other words, Morrissey is still behaving just like Morrissey.

Since I ran the interview through Google’s translator so I could read it in English, it ended up a bit rough. However this only made the interview all the more amusing. It starts off with journalist Diego A. Manrique (whose own translated Wikipedia bio says he’s been “specializing in criticizing music since 1975”) noting that after sending off a “questionnaire” to Moz, the answers that were returned to him were unequivocally “Morrisseynianas,” and could without a doubt be attributed to him as they were filled with “acute malevolence” and Morrissey’s “recognizable narcissism.” It also states that Morrissey always comes to interviews with “loaded guns.” Here’s a few highlights from Google’s translated version of the interview:

Morrissey on bullfighting:

Bullfighters are vermin: they should kill each other.


 
There’s a track on World Peace titled “The Bullfighter Dies.” Remember, Moz is giving this interview to the largest newspaper in Spain where bullfighting continues to be an important part of Spanish culture. But just like Sweet Brown and her bronchitis, Morrissey just ain’t got time for that.

On the autobiographies of his peers (again, the text is translated by Google and I haven’t adjusted it):

I’m surprised that so many colleagues who actually think they have something to say! When you read his books, it does not. My Autobiography exists, is self-explanatory. So I will not talk about the book on television, radio or newspapers.

Translation aside, this is pretty much classic Moz refusing to answer a question while using many words to communicate said refusal.

On parting ways with his former label, Harvest Records:

I was not me, kicked me! They tried to keep my record but found that they had no rights. A very stupid mess, caused by an officer named Steve Barnett, who has less brains than an artificial flower. The fact that someone like that carry a label is a sign of how bad things are in the musical world.

You may remember that at a gig in Lisbon on October 7th, Moz’s band all wore “Fuck Harvest” t-shirts in protest of Morrissey’s claims that the label had “dropped” him and “botched” the release of World Peace. Despite this, the record ended up in the number two spot on the UK charts back in July following its release proving the fact that nobody kicks Morrissey, Morrissey kicks YOU!

On the upcoming apocalypse and the never-ending ecological destruction of the world:

Industrial agriculture and factory farming are destroying the planet. Every time I see the yellow M of McDonald’s think about death. Governments tolerate whatever brings money; benefit from the inclination of the human race by suicide. It amuses me that there are countries where the suicide attempt is punished while governments spend billions on nuclear weapons, which facilitate collective suicide. Just to be used once to disappear all here.

And there you have it. Morrissey translated by Google from Spanish to English is just as morose and as acutely malevolent as he ever was. God save the Queen.

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
Nope, not trash but meticulously made… ART (see for yourself if you don’t believe us)
10.17.2014
10:22 am

Topics:
Art

Tags:
Tom Pfannerstill


 
Tales on message boards that are unlikely enough to elicit significant doubt are often followed by “Pics or it didn’t happen.” In the case of the work of Tom Pfannerstill, we could update that to “Didn’t happen until I touch it.” The works in his “From the Street” series are pieces basswood carved into shapes and then painted to resemble, incredibly, folded and stained pieces of mass-produced detritus like beer cans and KFC containers. They’re close enough to pass for the real thing on first glance, for sure. Only when you look very carefully are traces of hand-painted type evident. My favorite is the legal pad.

Anyone who takes this much painstaking time and effort on artworks of this type has earned the right to expound a little on their meaning, which Pfannerstill does on his website. Here’s an excerpt:
 

Each of these objects was at one time a near-perfect clone of millions of others of it’s type. It was designed and manufactured to exacting standards. By the time I find it, it has become a tiny study of opposing forces. Mechanical geometric precision is altered by organic twists, bends and folds. The inherent rationality is overlaid with elements of chance. The sparkling clean surfaces are smudged and marked by everyday dirt, grit and grime. No two objects have exactly the same journey , so no two are marked in exactly the same way. Each wears a record of its own particular history, has become unique. It is this difference, this particular story of this particular object that I attempt to capture.

 
I almost wish we were Buzzfeed so that I could write a headline like “PAINTED WOOD AMAZING BLAH BLAH. NUMBER FOUR WILL BLOW YOUR MIND.”
 

 

 

 

 

 
More astounding pieces of carved and painted wood that will BLOW YOUR MIND after the jump…..

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Please God, make it stop! 90 minutes of the Grateful Dead tuning up
10.17.2014
09:36 am

Topics:
Amusing
Music

Tags:
Grateful Dead
supercut


 
On his “chat show,” Kevin Pollak has told the story more than once of a bit by the comedy troupe of Barry Levinson and Craig T. Nelson from some unspecified moment in the late 1960s or early 1970s when earnest folk duos were dominating coffee houses up and down the west coast. For one of their “songs,” Nelson and Levinson simply tuned their acoustic guitars for nine minutes. According to Levinson, after a minute or two the audience would cotton to the gag and kind of murmur in an abashed way. Around minute four, however, the audience would grow restless and hostile, as if to say, “NO. You are NOT doing this!” But sticktoitiveness has its benefits, after weathering the rough patch in the middle, more often than not the audience would find it even funnier than at the outset. Every time they did the gag, it would take everything that Levinson and Nelson had not to bail on the bit during the tough middle minutes. Hanging in there usually paid dividends, even if it was tough in the moment.

One wonders how “Tuning ’77,” a 90-minute supercut of the Grateful Dead tuning their instruments while touring in 1977, would go over if it were played live. For this unusual audio file, Atlanta-based artist Michael David Murphy sifted through a number of Grateful Dead live recordings on the Internet Archive that surely would tax my patience after ... well, twenty minutes maybe. And yet I find that listening to “Tuning ’77” is kind of pleasing in a background-music kind of way.

As Murphy states, the audio file is “a seamless audio supercut of an entire year of the Grateful Dead tuning their instruments, live on stage. Chronologically sequenced, this remix incorporates every publicly available recording from 1977, examining the divide between audience expectation and performance anxiety.” “Tuning ‘77” is available on archive.org, which also hosts the files that constituted its source material.

Here it is, go crazy:
 

 

 
via AV Club

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Slayer’s public health warning
10.17.2014
08:33 am

Topics:
Music
Politics

Tags:
Slayer


 
Close friends know that I’ve been in mourning since Slayer discontinued their signature line of rolling papers, but seeing this item in the webstore got me out of my black Slayer tee and into my faded black one in no time flat. I used to be in a Seasons in the Abyss mood, but today I’m blasting Show No Mercy. This handsome \m/ metal \m/ sign measures 12"x18”, retails for $15, and is a great way to let clients (prospective and actual) know where you’re coming from.

If I’m not very much mistaken, the idea for this awareness-raising sign came from the guerrilla sticker campaign of @CarveSlayer (see below), and not from OSHA. I rejoice that Slayer has given this message official sanction.
 

 
I don’t know why it isn’t mandatory to display this notice in every American workplace. It’s 2014, people, and this is the most cost-effective way of addressing the major public health issue of our time. My fellow Californians, let’s clean up our act and get this on the ballot in 2016. We Slayer fans are human beings too. #IAmASlayerFan

Posted by Oliver Hall | Leave a comment
No butts, it’s a Christmas tree?
10.17.2014
06:58 am

Topics:
Amusing
Art

Tags:
Paul McCarthy

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I know what some of you are thinking—but you’re wrong: this is a giant inflatable Christmas tree. Well, an installation actually (or is it sculpture?) by American artist Paul McCarthy.

The clue is in the title: “Tree” and its color—green.

McCarthy specifically designed “Tree” for the Foire Internationale d’Art Contemporain (Fiac) or the contemporary art fair being held in Paris between the 23rd and 26th October.

However, it appears this 80ft erection (stop sniggering…) in the stylish Place Vendome has been “making passers-by feel a little uncomfortable” because, as France TV Info reports, many Parisians are unable to associate this festive installation with “the magic of the holidays”(!)

Understandably, this confusion led to much jocularity on Twitter.
 

 

 

 
And the usual seething outrage from the far-right groups like Printemps Francais who tweeted their disgust about the work:

“Taxpayers – this is where your money goes!” said one post, while another claimed the Place Vendome had been “disfigured” and Paris “humiliated”.

Meanwhile the British free newspaper Metro is running a poll on exactly what their readers think the piece represents.

I am sure the 69-year-old artist McCarthy is probably used to this kind of debate over his art. Last year, McCarthy outraged/amused the Chinese with his giant “turd” installation “Complex Pile” in Hong Kong—which when put together with “Tree” does suggest a vague theme going on his work…
 
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Via France TV Info
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
The Fleshtones rock out in ‘Soul City’ (co-written by a young Lou Reed)


 
Animator and all around 3-D mad scientist/genius M. Henry Jones has long been a fixture of the East Village. With his street level art studio allowing passersby to see his fantastic creations since 1992 (he’s recently had to move) the friendly Jones is one of the last bohemian artists still left in the neighborhood. Jones has also helped keep the work of his friend Harry Smith alive with “magic lantern” screenings of Smith’s animated films utilizing multiple projectors, mounted the world over with DJ Spooky.

During the late 1970s, while both were students at the School of Visual Arts, Jones became friends with Peter Zaremba, leader of garage rockers The Fleshtones (and later the host of MTV’s The Cutting Edge series) and they teamed up to make a music video marrying Jones’ strobelight animation technique to a number titled “Soul City” (a song originally recorded by the Hi Lifes and co-written by a young Lou Reed).
 

 
Marc H. Miller’s Gallery 98 is currently exhibiting ten hand-colored cutout photographs that M. Henry Jones created for the film:

The emergence of digital photography during the last decade has provided a new perspective on photographs from the pre-digital era. The photographs that M. Henry Jones created in the late 1970s for the animated film “Soul City” have a special place in this story of technological change.

Sometimes the urge to create precedes the technology that makes it practical. That was certainly true for Jones’ 2 ½-minute photo animation of a performance by the rock group Fleshtones, enhanced with stroboscopic effects. Created before the widespread use of computers, digitization, and tools like Photoshop (1988), Jones’ special effects were created solely through tedious analog techniques. It took nearly two years but there was an unexpected bonus: 1700 individually printed photographs, each hand-cut with an X-acto knife and then hand-colored. This was the raw material for the film, re-shot frame-by-frame with changing backgrounds. Today these photographs stand on their own both as beautiful objects and as an artistic record of the creative toils that preceded the digital revolution.

 

 
The making of this elaborate, time-consuming piece was apparently quite legendary at S.V.A. The exhibit also makes a bit clearer the connections between that school and not only the nascent East Village art scene, but also the punk and New Wave era in New York City as well. After all it was artists and art students who were the ones making the scene (man). Aside from Jones and Zaremba, S.V.A. counted among its students Keith Haring, Kenny Scharf, John Sex, and for a short while, the great painter Joe Coleman, who left in disgust when one of the instructors told him that he was painting “wrong.”
 

 
As someone who has made my own share of work and time intensive low budget East Village music videos, I doff my hat to the maniac workaholic who put this puppy together…
 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Rock legend Ian McLagan this week on ‘The Pharmacy’
10.16.2014
12:37 pm

Topics:
Music
Pop Culture

Tags:
The Pharmacy
Ian McLagan


 
Gregg Foreman’s radio program The Pharmacy is a music / talk show playing heavy soul, raw funk, 60′s psych, girl groups, Krautrock. French yé-yé, Hammond organ rituals, post-punk transmissions and “ghost on the highway” testimonials and interviews with the most interesting artists and music makers of our times…

This Week:

Ian McLagan of The Small Faces and Faces. He’s also played with the likes of Bob Dylan, The Rolling Stones and Nikki Sudden.

Topics include:

The original Mod scene, joining Small Faces and the formation of The Faces when Steve Marriott departed to form Humble Pie and Rod Stewart and Ron Wood joined after leaving The Jeff Beck Group; destroying Holiday Inns from coast to coast, playing on Some Girls with the Rolling Stones and the origins of that distinctive “rooster” haircut sported by Rod, Ronnie and Mac…
 

 
Mr. Pharmacy is a musician and DJ who has played for the likes of Pink Mountaintops, The Delta 72, The Black Ryder, The Meek and more. Since 2012 Gregg Foreman has been the musical director of Cat Power’s band. He started dj’ing 60s Soul and Mod 45’s in 1995 and has spun around the world. Gregg currently lives in Los Angeles, CA and divides his time between playing live music, producing records and dj’ing various clubs and parties from LA to Australia.

Set List:

Intro
Come on Children - Small Faces
Tainted Love - Gloria Jones
Intro 1 / 25 Miles - Bill Doggett / Rx
Conversation Ian McLagan Part 1
My Baby Loves to Boogaloo - Don Gardner
Own Up Time - Small Faces
The Girl Can’t Dance - Bunker Hill
Jerkin’ the Dog - The Mighty Hannibal
Here Comes the Judge - Pigmeat Markham
I Can’t Believe What You Say - Ike and Tina Turner
Intro 2 / Hot BBQ - Brother Jack McDuff / Rx
Conversation Ian McLagan Part 2
Bad ‘n’ Ruin - Faces
Bert’s Apple Crumble - The Quik
Rip It Up - Little Richard
Night Time - The Strangeloves
The Wig - Lorenzo Holden
Almost Grown - Small Faces
Bring Down the Birds - Herbie Hancock
Intro 3 / The Point - Mac Rebennack / Rx
Conversation Ian McLagan Part 3
Look For Me Baby - The Kinks
Do the Whoopie - Sugar Pie DeSanto
The Boo Boo Song - King Coleman
Don’t You Want My Lovin’ - The Orlons
You’ve Got Me Uptight - Evie Sands
Out In The Street - The Who
Intro 4 / In The Midnight Hour - Billy Preston / Rx
Conversation Ian McLagan Part 4
Big Bird - Eddie Floyd
Keep On Keepin’ On - Nolan Porter
My World is Empty Without You - The Supremes
Heatwave - Martha and The Vandellas
I’m Rowed Out - The Eyes
Green Light - The Equals
Down Home Girl - The Rolling Stones
Red Beans and Rice - Booker T & the MG’s
Intro 5 / Soul Dressing - Rx / Booker T & the MG’s
Conversation Ian McLagan Part 5
We’re a Winner - The Impressions
I’m The Face - High Numbers
Out of Sight - James Brown
Intro 6 / Grits - The JB’s / Rx
I Gotta Dance to Keep from Crying - Smokey Robinson & The Miracles
Outro

 
You can download the show in its entirety here.

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Böat of debauchery: Inside the Motörhead ‘Motörböat’ cruise
10.16.2014
11:37 am

Topics:
Heroes
Music

Tags:
Motörhead

Motorhead Motorboat inflatable doll can fly!
 
I had heard rumors that the Motörhead “Motörböat” cruise ran out of booze before the trip was over. Of course that’s not shocking news when you’re talking about a boat full of hard-drinking headbangers, Lemmy Kilmister (who despite his recent health issues has switched out his beloved Jack Daniels for vodka because it’s “better for you”) as well as various other metal bands that love their party liquids.

I have to admit, I hate boats almost as much as I hate planes. I detest relinquishing control of my own trajectory to another human being and I have no desire to be stuck on what many consider an enormous floating toilet. That said, the only thing that could likely get me on a boat would be if Motörhead got on it with me, then blew my face off with a live show and there was no risk of the bar going dry. That and I’d really like to hang out with the folks in the photos that follow, including Lemmy who’s looking pretty healthy these days. Be advised that a few may be considered NSFW (you did notice the photo at the top, right?), but this is Motörhead we’re talking about.

All photos by Dana “Distortion” Yavin.
 
Motorhead Motorboat cruise inflatable doll goes swimming
 
Motorvampire Motorhead Motorboat cruise
 
More after the jump…
 

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
Here be monsters: Incredible illustrations from ‘De Monstris’ (1665)
10.16.2014
10:32 am

Topics:
Books
History

Tags:
monsters
De Monstris
Fortunio Liceti

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Fortunio Liceti (1577-1657) was an Italian philosopher, doctor and scientist. He studied medicine and philosophy at the University of Bologna before becoming a lecturer of logic at the University of Pisa and then a professor of philosophy at the University of Padua. Liceti was omnivorous in his interests writing books on mathematics, philosophy, astronomy, genetics and disease. He was friends with Galileo and the mathematician Bonaventura Cavalieri, who once remarked that Liceti was such a prodigious scholar that he produced a book a week. It’s certainly true that Liceti did have a rather impressive output of scientific and philosophical texts during his life ranging on subjects as diverse as the immortality of the soul, gem stones and the causes of headaches (which he thought were the microcosmic equivalent of lightning).

His most famous work was De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis (Of the causes of monsters, nature and differences) that documented the many “monstrosities” and deformities reported in nature. The book chimed with the public’s interest in “monsters” and “freaks” and Liceti documented all of the stories of man-beasts, mermaids, wolf children as well as the physical abnormalities he had witnessed (co-joined twins, multiple-limbed children, hermaphrodites and alike). Liceti did not consider these “monstri” as abnormal, but rather as attempts of nature to fashion life as best as possible, in the same way an artist would create art with whatever materials were available.

It is said that I see the convergence of both Nature and art, because one or the other not being able to make what they want, they at least make what they can.

He was also the first to posit the idea that fetal disease could lead to abnormalities in children.

De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis was first published in 1616 without illustrations, a lavish illustrated second edition was published in Padua in 1634, with a further edition De monstris (or what you might call the mass market edition) was produced in Amsterdam in 1665. It is from the last edition that these incredible images are from.

A PDF of De monstris is available here.
 
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More illustrations from ‘De monstri’ after the jump…

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
The Muppets go Situationist

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I doubt I’ll be able to watch The Muppets again without quotes from Guy Debord popping up unannounced in my noodle. These magnificent images are the work of artist and writer Amy Collier, who posted them on Toast where she gives some explanation of her work in the comments:

Oh look! I found some history about Guy Debord’s “The Muppets”:

Though the name “Guy Debord” is now synonymous with two things: Situationist philosophy and The Muppets, this pairing of passions was not as easily reconciled as you might think. “I had to fight really hard not to be pigeon-holed as a Marxist theorist in the puppeteering community,” Debord once said. “They told me ‘Kids don’t want to hear about how the concrete life of everyone has been degraded to a speculative universe, Guy.’ I said ‘How about we let the children decide that?’”

Decide they did.

Years later, we remember him as both a Marxist visionary who criticized societies where modern conditions of production prevail in which all of life presents itself as an immense accumulation of spectacles, and the beloved man who brought Kermit, Miss Piggy, as well as many other characters into our hearts.

You can read the rest of it here and now I can’t wait for On the Passage of The Muppets in Rather Brief Unity of Time.
 
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More of Guy Debord’s Muppets, after the jump…
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Descent Into The Maelstrom: Scorching Radio Birdman live set from 1977
10.16.2014
09:50 am

Topics:
Music
Punk

Tags:
Radio Birdman


 
You can make a case that Radio Birdman is the most important Aussie band ever. You have to deal with AC/DC, of course, but there are plenty of philosophical tacks that can get you there. You have to deal with their contemporaries The Saints, who are of similar importance in Australia (and of course, there’s always the Birthday Party…). This week saw the Australian release of this ass-kicking 8-disc Radio Birdman box set (7 CDs, 1 DVD)—fortunately, there’s a helpful guide to help you navigate its riches.

Radio Birdman famously named themselves after misunderstanding Iggy’s vocals in the Stooges’ song “1970” off of Fun House.  (The words they misunderstood were “radio burnin’.”) In 1977 Radio Birdman played the Marryatville Hotel in Adelaide, video for which is supplied below—the description says HD, but more importantly, it’s a multi-cam gig. As you’ll see, the place was packed to the gills, and vocalist Rob Younger is pretty much climbing up the walls with energy. I really like his two-fisted approach to holding the mic, actually two mics duct-taped together, it completely gives him a signature look. The songs are broken up by some interview segments which were obviously done after the gig. Keybs guy Pip Hoyle gamely parses the distinction, probably far more salient in 1977, between “energetic” and “aggressive” for the interviewer.
 

 
As terrific as this quarter-hour of footage is, it isn’t the Radio Birdman show I’d give my left arm to see. As Dave Thompson explains in his book Alternative Rock: “Another now-legendary show found them playing the Lions Club in Armadale, to a hall full of pensioners who were as puzzled by the band as the band were by them. Radio Birdman played three songs before they were asked to stop, for fear of killing the feebler members of the audience.” Now that must have been a show to see…. I guess that one isn’t about to pop up on YouTube, huh.

About halfway through the video, a caption pops up with the words “Rocturnal, May 9, 1978,” prompting some questions about whether the Marryatville Hotel/1977 designations are accurate. Fear not. Rocturnal signifies the TV show that aired the footage, according to Thompson: “Further proof of Radio Birdman’s status was supplied when one of their Adelaide gigs was filmed by ABC’s Rocturnal show.”
 

Track listing:
What Gives
Descent Into The Maelstrom
Burn My Eye
Search and Destroy (Stooges cover)

 

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Grandma’s ceramic figurines get a grim makeover
10.16.2014
07:37 am

Topics:
Art

Tags:
Black metal

Black metal nun by Coffin Collector
Black metal nun
 
I have once again been sucked back into the weird, weird world that is Portland, Oregon. And this time shit has gotten grim. Portland-based artist Tom LaBonty says that after spending so much time as a “forager” in thrift stores rummaging around for ceramic figures (like those “precious” Hummels your grandmother would slap you over if you touched hers), the idea “dawned on him” to start giving the heartwarming pieces black metal makeovers. And the rest as they say, is history. The results, especially when it comes to Tom’s treatment of religious-themed statues are so metal it hurts my neck just to write about it.

Notable inhabitants of Tom’s collection include a nightlight featuring hot-rod enthusiast Jesus outfitted with a pair of satanic wings and, a ceramic little Dutch boy hauling a bunch of body parts in his buckets instead of milk. Prices range from $10 - $70 per piece over at LaBonty’s Etsy store, Coffin Collector.

Your grandmother might not approve but WHO CARES?
 
Ghoulish Dutch boy by Coffin Collector
Ghoulish Dutch boy
 
Little grim girl by Coffin Collector
Little grim girl
 
Black metal raindrops by Coffin Collector
 
More after the jump…
 

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
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