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‘Jesus’ arrested for refusing to leave Apple Store
05.04.2016
11:41 am

Topics:
Amusing
Belief

Tags:
Jesus Christ
Apple
Philadelphia


 
His real name is Michael Grant, but residents of the city that made the Philly cheesesteak sandwich famous simply refer to him as “Philly Jesus.” On Monday evening around 6 p.m. Philly Jesus was checking his emails at an Apple Store on Walnut Street in Philadelphia when management asked him to leave.

Philly Jesus refused to leave, so the Philly store manager called the Philly police.

Police arrived in due course and requested that Grant leave the premises. According to police, Grant refused to leave and was creating a disturbance. Grant was taken into custody and charged with Defiant Trespassing and Disorderly Conduct.

It is not known whether Jesus was updating his JDate profile or not. However, if nothing else, the incident establishes that Jesus is not a Windows user.

This is not the first time the Philly J-Man has been arrested. In 2014 Grant was arrested at Dilworth Plaza for Disorderly Conduct and Failure to Disperse. Grant’s contention at the time was that he was misunderstood; he said he doesn’t ask for money, but he does accept tips.
 

 
Photos: Jen A. Miller; via Arbroath

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Miniature recreations of Philadelphia’s vanishing urban artifacts
07.21.2015
11:41 am

Topics:
Art
Economy

Tags:
Philadelphia
miniatures

A miniature replica of The Forum
A miniature replica of The Forum XXX Theater in Philadelphia (RIP)
 
Long-time Philadelphia resident and artist Drew Leshko, has created incredibly detailed miniature versions of some of his city’s decaying architecture.
 
Miniature version of the Revival Temple in Philadelphia
Revival Temple
 
Inspired by subjects found in his own neighborhood, Leshko’s goal was to enlighten people to the ever-encroaching gentrification of his city by preserving structures and objects in miniature form that have been a part of his community for many decades. Especially structures that will soon be replaced by shinier, newer buildings or businesses. Using a layering technique, Leshko carves his three-dimensional relics out of paper and wood and creates 1:12 scale replicas of fading local attractions like the “Set- it-Up-Go-Go-Bar” (which is still open), XXX movie theater “The Forum” (RIP), or everyday objects like dumpsters decorated with bumper stickers, signs, long gone businesses or other reminders of the past.
 
Close up of miniature/phone and stickers (finger for scale)
 
Wherever you might be reading this, it’s likely that in the very recent past you have said goodbye to yet another part of your own town’s cultural heritage. And there seems to be no stopping this disturbing, profit-driven trend. Thanks to an artist like Leshko, a piece of that heritage will live on and be remembered by those who grew up with them, and will hopefully serve as a reminder to future residents of cities like Philadelphia that preserving our past has as much to do with ensuring our future as anything else.
 
Miniature of The World Famous Set it Off Go-Go Bar
Miniature of The World Famous Set-it-Off-Go-Go-Bar in Philadelphia
 
United Check Cashing miniature replica
United Check Cashing
 
More miniature Philly after the jump…

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
Philadelphia commuters treated to unexpected bursts of high-speed color
05.15.2014
10:29 am

Topics:
Art

Tags:
Philadelphia
Katharina Grosse

Katharina Grosse
 
For the past two weeks, rail commuters in the greater Philadelphia area have been speeding past brief bursts of startling day-Glo color, standing out in the otherwise typical greys and browns of a major Eastern metropolis. The project, underwritten by the City of Philadelphia’s Mural Arts Program, is the handiwork of noted German artist Katharina Grosse, and it’s intended to give a little aesthetic jolt to the doubtless sleepy train ride passengers take every morning.
 
Katharina Grosse
 
The work exists on seven sites between the North Philadelphia Station and the 30th Street Station downtown, which conveniently serves trains from the Amtrak, SEPTA and NJ Transit rail networks—so plenty of people will see the installation. As the artist says, “I need the brilliance of color to get close to people, to stir up a sense of life experience and heighten their sense of presence.”
 
Katharina Grosse
 
Vaguely (but not derivatively) reminiscent of Christo’s massive interventions, the work bears the somewhat trying-too-hard name psychylustro, and seems more than anything else a temporal version of those nifty anamorphic 3D sidewalk paintings you’ve seen—the angles of the lime green paint splatters on the sprawling building at “site 7” near the North Philadelphia Station seem specifically tailored to be more arresting when viewed from the moving train.

Grosse has specialized in ambitious large-scale works that fall somewhere between site-specific installation art and architecture; it’s not too much of a stretch to call her an abstract architect. Based on my perusal of the small selection of artworks shown at the bottom of this page, psychylustro seems to be a more successful work than the others shown because of its utilitarian pop and also the requirement to use bold colors—in my estimation, anyway.

The sites represent a cross-section of urban decay, including an old railroad trestle and an abandoned warehouse with trees today popping through its collapsed roof, and the colors—bright orange, lime green, hot pink—were surely chosen to stand out. Curator Liz Thomas observes that the work’s purpose is to inject “a beautiful disruption into a daily routine” and to provoke “an experience that asks people to think about this space that they hurtle through every day.”

Grosse intentionally declined to protect the exposed paint with sealant, so the inevitable months-long process of decay has, well, already begun. Eventually the lime-green warehouse will fade and become besmirched by some form of urban grime. Honestly, I hope it doesn’t end up being an eyesore, because in its current form it’s quite something.
 
Katharina Grosse
 
Katharina Grosse
 
Katharina Grosse
 
Katharina Grosse
 
Katharina Grosse
 
Katharina Grosse
 
Katharina Grosse
 
Katharina Grosse
 
Katharina Grosse
 
Here’s a playful time-lapse video documenting the creation of a hot-pink site. I’d love to see video from the train! But so far there isn’t anything like that on YouTube.
 

 
via Designboom

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment