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Inexpensive ‘Planet of the Apes’ masks and costumes for Halloween
09.28.2016
09:57 am
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Dr. Zaius
 
Since at least the early 90s I’ve always told myself that one day I’d be Dr. Zaius for Halloween. Sadly, each Halloween would come and go and I was never Dr. Zaius. I guess it’s because I never really knew how to go about getting his look down exactly. I wanted it to be perfect. It would be pointless otherwise and everyone would just mistake it for Donald Trump. It seemed like a lot of prosthetics would be involved and that I’d have to hire a professional makeup artist to get it just right. So in other words, something really expensive I couldn’t convince myself to do.

Halloween is soon upon us, and I, now an adult women, still want to be Dr. Zaius. It’s weird, I know, but I just gotta do this at some point in my life. So I got curious and started searching on the Internet if my childish 90s dream was still possible in 2016. And it is. That’s where the website Ape Mania comes in. They sell perfectly expensive latex Planet of the Apes masks but they also have a section called “Economy Masks.” Holy shit I finally struck Planet of the Apes gold, right?! 

Each mask is handmade of durable, high quality latex and a blend of human and synthetic hair. The prices for the masks vary, but they average for about $145 each. That’s not too shabby considering it would probably end up costing you thousands it you wanted to go the prosthetic route and hire a Hollywood makeup artist. And who’s got time for that?

Now if you’re worried about the costume and accessories aspect you can score one of those “Made in China” discontinued Donald Trump suits pretty cheaply these days—just kidding—there’s a whole section on Ape Mania that supplies ape outfits, too. You can click here to view the accessaries.


Cornelius
 

Zira
 
More after the jump…

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Posted by Tara McGinley
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09.28.2016
09:57 am
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Paul Williams sings in his ‘Planet of the Apes’ makeup
06.27.2016
02:45 pm
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Paul Williams, the witty and diminutive singer-songwriter (Carpenters, Three Dog Night)  would often appear on 70s talk shows, games shows, on The Love Boat, in Smokey and the Bandit, on The Muppet Show, celebrity roasts—not to mention his greatest role as “Swan” in Brian DePalma’s campy cult classic Phantom of the Paradise. He was in, or on just about anything back then, including heaping mountains of cocaine (Hence all of that manic energy he used to exhibit back then.)

Williams also played “Virgil” the smart orangutan in Battle for the Planet of the Apes. He wore his makeup straight from the 20th Century Fox movie set for this memorable appearance promoting the film on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson in 1973 and sang in costume.
 

Posted by Richard Metzger
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06.27.2016
02:45 pm
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‘The Ape’: Fake newspaper promotes ‘Planet of the Apes,’ 1968
05.19.2015
03:36 pm
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Comedian Dana Gould, who might actually be the world’s most fervent Planet of the Apes fan, often says that the appeal of the first movie lay in the fact that it featured “Moses dressed like Tarzan running from King Kong dressed like Fonzie.”

In the run-up to the final episode of Mad Men, AMC generated these self-congratulatory videos in which prominent people gush about how awesome the show is. Gould took advantage of his segment, linked at the bottom of this post, to point out that Mad Men had included the historically accurate touch of Don Draper reading a copy of The Ape in “The Flood,” an episode from Season 6 in which Don takes his son Bobby to see the sci-fi classic (a new movie in the narrative, of course).
 

Don Draper enjoys The Ape in Season 6 of Mad Men
 
Yes, it does appear that 20th Century Fox went the extra mile and had fake newspapers called The Ape and Future News printed up. Given the headline on the Future News one, it’s likely that that one was intended to promote Conquest of the Planet of the Apes, which came out in 1972. The idea of a newspaper called Future News (and billing itself as “The Future’s Picture Newspaper”) is pretty hilarious in itself. You know how we all live in the future from the perspective of our ancestors, so we do that all the time too, right? The date on that one is “Monday, May 22, 1992,” which is consistent with the plot of Conquest, which starts out in 1991, but that day was actually a Friday, and most memorable to some people as the final night of Johnny Carson’s tenure as host of The Tonight Show.

Solving the tangled chronology of the Planet of the Apes—even just the first five movies—would take the combined brainpower of MIT, and something similar goes for trying to suss out the details of these promotional newspapers, about which there isn’t very much information online.
 

 
Continues after the jump…

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Posted by Martin Schneider
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05.19.2015
03:36 pm
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Watch every episode of your cult TV favorites playing at the same time

strktronek.jpg
 
Why? How? Who cares! This is just rather awesome!

YouTube user Omni Verse has put together ten minute packages of your favorite cult TV shows in an intense “videoggedon,” where all the episodes are played at the same time!

From Star Trek and The Twilight Zone, to Kolchak—The Night Stalker, Planet of the Apes and Doctor Who. This is like a ten minute sugar rush of cult TV heaven!
 

‘Star Trek’ all 80 episodes played at same time.
 

The Twilight Zone’ all 156 episodes at the same time.
 

‘Kolchak—The Night Stalker’ 20 eps all at once.
 

‘Doctor Who’ all 178 Tom Baker episodes.
 
More cult TV all at once, after the jump…
 

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Posted by Paul Gallagher
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01.07.2014
02:32 pm
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‘Planet of the Apes’: A behind-the-scenes home movie of the 1968 classic film

image
 
Roddy McDowall’s behind-the-scenes look at the making of the classic film Planet of the Apes in 1968. The quality is incredible as we watch McDowall slowly made-up to look like Cornelius, and then join his co-stars, Kim Hunter, Maurice Evans and Charlton Heston, on the beach at Malibu for the film’s shock ending. I can still recall the playground buzz over this film, months before its arrival in the U.K. The bubble gum trading cards came first, only one grocery store stocked them, its owner, a thin, waxen-faced man in his late 50s, couldn’t fathom the film’s attraction. “Talking apes? What utter nonsense…tsk..tsk…tsk. Whatever next?” But it was believable to our fertile minds, and revolutionary.

This was the film that inspired my admiration for Roddy McDowall - how could he wear all that make-up? What was it like to act with it on? McDowall later said:

“A year before production, [the producer] Arthur Jacobs talked to me about the project. I was one of the few people he explained the whole thing to, including the ending. He talked with me about playing Cornelius, and I thought it was all intriguing. About a year later, I signed to do the film, and to have my face molded for the makeup. The first film was very difficult because it was made in the summertime, at the Malibu Ranch. In August, with all those quartz lights, it hits like 140*, and it’s just unbearable. Although it was a wonderful experience, because I like [director] Frank Schaffner very much, I thought I would never do one again….”

“The heat made us perspire, which in turn worked on the spirit gum which in turn forces the reapplication of the adhesive - which in its turn works on the skin….”

Planet of the Apes is a very hard film for me to judge because it was such a physical agony doing it. I’d begin to sweat remembering the heat. I think it’s a fabulous movie, up until I come into the film, and then it’s just purely a subjective reaction.”

The difficulties of wearing his make-up didn’t stop McDowall returning to the role of Cornelius in Escape from Planet of the Apes (1971), Conquest of the Planet of the Apes (1972), Battle for the Planet of the Apes (1973), and a Planet of the Apes TV series, all which I followed through the books, the comics, the cards and the films.
 

 

Posted by Paul Gallagher
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03.12.2012
07:22 pm
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Planet of the Apes: Trophies
08.15.2011
02:41 pm
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Limited edition of 100, signed and numbered 13” x 19” print on fine art, acid-free paper
 
Limited editon print by Jason Edmiston.

This painting is inspired by the scene at the beginning of the first Apes movie. Gorilla soldiers are standing posing for a photo after the great human hunt. This is the view from the photographer’s perspective.

(via Laughing Squid)

Posted by Tara McGinley
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08.15.2011
02:41 pm
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